2011 POETRY READING LESSON PLANS

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POETRY UNITReading Workshop Big Ideas: typeoflanguagethepoetusestocreateimages. lives. Generatefeelingsandemotionsinresponsetothepoem. Appreciateaspectsofthepoemlikerhythmandrhyme. Consideralternativeinterpretationsofthepoem.

Lesson 1: Sharing Teacher’s PoemsConnection Tell students they are starting a new genre of study – poetry. Remind them the purpose of allreading is to understand what the author is telling us, which applies to poetry as well. When you read poetry you think of what the poem says and read for meaning.Teaching Tell students reading poetry differs from reading stories or nonfiction texts. Poetry looksdifferent, uses fewer words in more powerful ways, is pleasing to listen to, and often fills readerswith feelings. Share some of your favorite poems.Active Engagement and Link Following the read alouds, students verbally reflect on their poetry perceptions. Tell students the class will create a classroom poem anthology or collection of poems. Whilethey read, ask students to look for poems that they would like to read to the class and submit tothe anthology. Introduce students to the poetry anthology project.Independent and Small Group Time Students read independently from poetry books and /or teacher selected poems. Confer with individual students and /or provide small group instruction.Sharing/Closure Students share out poems they may want to add to the class poetry anthology book.At the conclusion of this unit, students perform a reading of their poems for an audience. Students do notneed to memorize poems, but will have copies during their readings. The anthology remains in the roomfor future repeated readings. Before Lesson 4, spend time explaining the purpose of reading theanthology (publicly showcase poems that are special to them) and that their chosen poems need to beones they can accurately, automatically, and pronounce. Limit each student to one poem to present butencourage them to collect a variety of poems to put into personal anthologies.Some questions to reflect on poems: This poem made me think about This poem made me remember This poem made me feel The author’s word choice I think this poem I think the author was trying to tell readers The phrase, “ ”, was used to make me think about This poem reminded me of another poem I read because Another title for this poem could be , because I think the title of this poem was a good choice because think the title of this poem was not a good choice because When the author says,“ ,” it reflects that the title is a good choice. I

Surpriseby Beverly McLoughlandThe biggestSurpriseOn the library shelfIs when you suddenlyFind yourselfInside a book –(The hidden you)You wonder howThe author knew.In the next few weeks, your job is to poems that remind youof yourself. Read a wide variety of poetry books rhyming,no rhyming, silly, serious, poems about family, nature, animals,the city, poems that speak about different feelings, etc.You will copy the poems in your reader’s notebook exactly asthey appear in the book, respecting line breaks and whitespaces.You will write a few sentences explaining how the poemReminds you of you.If you can’t find a poem you connect to,keep looking. It might take several days!

Poetry Collection ProjectTitle of PoemPoet’s NameCopy the poem exactly as it appears, including line breaks and white space. Then don’t forget to writea few sentences explaining how and why this poem reminds you of you.Poetry Collection ProjectTitle of PoemPoet’s NameCopy the poem exactly as it appears, including line breaks and white space. Then don’t forget to writea few sentences explaining how and why this poem reminds you of you.Poetry Collection ProjectTitle of PoemPoet’s NameCopy the poem exactly as it appears, including line breaks and white space. Then don’t forget to writea few sentences explaining how and why this poem reminds you of you.Poetry Collection ProjectTitle of PoemPoet’s NameCopy the poem exactly as it appears, including line breaks and white space. Then don’t forget to writea few sentences explaining how and why this poem reminds you of you.Poetry Collection ProjectTitle of PoemPoet’s NameCopy the poem exactly as it appears, including line breaks and white space. Then don’t forget to writeA few sentences explaining how and why this poem reminds you of you.

Lesson 2: Using a “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” ChartConnection Remind students when they read poetry, they need to think about what authors or poets aresaying and read to understand the poems. Today they learn a poetry-reading strategy to helpthem remember wheat to do when the read poetry.Teaching Reading poetry is different from other kids of reading. Poetry is organized differently, so theywill learn a strategy to help them understand poem’s meanings. They will use a “Four FingerPoetry Overview” to help them understand how to read poems. Show students the “Four FingerPoetry Overview” Chart. Demonstrate checking off each point on four fingers:o Look for the poem’s title and poet (stress that the title tells what the poem is about andknowing the poet may give meaning hints)o Look at the poem’s first and last lines (first and last lines may give readers importantinformation about the poem’s meaning).o Look for rhymes (words that sound the same at the end, because poets use rhymes to addmusical soundo Look for important words or repeated words (often poets repeat important words, sincethey are key to the poem’s meaning).Active Engagement and Link Conduct a shared reading of the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” chart, with students checkingoff each point on their fingers. Show the overhead of “Nine” by Eloise Greenfield from page 8 ofNathaniel Talking. Model skimming the poem, stressing the four points from the “Four-FingerPoetry Overview” chart. Read the poem in its entirety. Ask students if the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” helped them understand the poem. Rereadthe poem. Show the overhead of “Last Touch” by Donald Graves on pages 62–63 from Baseball,Snakes, and Summer Squash Poems about Growing Up. Do a shared reading of the poem. Withpartners, students practice the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview.” Reread the poem. Discuss how the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” helped them understand thepoem. Encourage students to use the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” as they independently read.Independent and Small Group Time Students read independently from poetry books and/or teacher-selected poems. Confer with individual students and/or provide small group instruction.Sharing/Closure Two or three students share out their experiences with using the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview.”

Four Finger Overview Chart(Understanding the meanings of various poems)1. Look for the poem’s title and poetThe title tells what the poem is about and knowing the poetmay give meaning hints2. Look at the poem’s first andlast lineThe first and last line may give you important informationabout the poem’s meaning3. Look for rhymesBecause poets use rhymes to add musical sound4. Look for important words orrepeated wordsOften poets repeat important words, since they are key tothe poem’s meaning

Nathaniel TalkingBy Eloise GreenfieldNineNine is fineWithout a doubtA wonderful age to beI know that’s what I thoughtAbout eight, seven, six,Five and four(Did I think it, too, about three?)But nine is really fineMe and these friends of mineWalk all over the neighborhoodYes, our parents said we couldWe’re not babies anymoreWe’re old enough to know the scoreWE don’t toe that same old lineNow that we’re nine

Lesson 3: Using Strategies to Read Poetry for Enjoyment and MeaningConnection Remind students when they read poetry, they need to think about what poets are saying and readto understand the poems. Using the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” strategy helps themunderstand what they read. Today students read and reread poetry for enjoyment and meaning.Teaching Tell students the more they read poems, the better they will understand their meanings. They canuse the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” strategy when previewing poems, which helps readersget an idea of what poems are about. Once students have a basic idea of the poem’s meaning, tell them to read the poem just to enjoyit. After the first read, tell students to reread the poem, thinking about the poem’s meaning andlooking for important words—what is the poet showing readers through his or her words?Active Engagement and Link Refer to the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” chart and quickly model the four-finger strategyusing the overhead of “Stealing Wood from Mr. Sweet.” Do a read aloud of the poem, askingstudents to listen and pay attention to their first thoughts and reactions. Ask students to brieflytalk about the poem with their partners: Did they like or dislike the poem and why. Following this discussion, tell students to reread the poem with partners. After rereading thepoem, ask students if they had questions about the poem’s meaning (for example, “Do you thinkthe boys thought it was wrong to take the wood? When do the boys know they should not havetaken the wood? Do you think Mr. Sweet was angry? What does ‘we move our army trucks,tanks, and guns, to our town, and haul all those pieces down the long road’ mean?”). Encourage students to practice the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” and read poems at least twice.Independent and Small Group Time Students read independently from poetry books and/or teacher-selected poems. Confer with individual students and/or provide small group instruction.Sharing/Closure Have students discuss poems they read and how rereading the poems helped them understand thepoems’ meaning.

Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash – Poems About Growing UpBy Donald GravesStealing Wood From Mr. SweetEach day after schoolmy brother and I walk by lumberlaid against the cemetery wall.The wood doesn’t seemto belong to anyone.The wood is in long thin stripsthat look like scrap.Each day we think maybewe’d build a hut,play war, cut out swordsor make ramps for our trucks.We never see anyone using it.So each daywe pick up a pieceand drag the long,thin boards behind us.No one says anythingOr seems to mind.We use the stripsas walls to guardtoy towns against invaders.

Lesson 4: Using Strategies to Read Poetry for Craft and MoodConnection Remind students to use the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” to get an idea of what poems will beabout. Tell them that to truly understand poems, they should first read for enjoyment, then rereadfor meaning. Today students practice this strategy and read the poem two more times to deepentheir understanding of the poem’s meaning.Teaching Tell students every time they reread poems, they go deeper into the poems’ meanings. To reallyunderstand poems’ meanings, it is important to read poems four times. Remind them that thefirst time they read is for enjoyment; rereads allow them to dive deeper into poems’ meanings. The next time they read, they should pay attention to the poet’s craft by looking for strategiespoets use when writing poems. Strategies could include word choice, repetition, rhythm, orimagery. The last time they read, they should consider the poems’ mood. “Think about what feelings poetstry to make you feel. Try to make self-to-text connections about what emotions you experienceas you read the poems.” Show students the “Poetry Rereads” chart you made explaining each re-reading’s purpose (seeend of this lesson). Hang the chart so students can refer to it.Active Engagement and Link Refer to the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” chart and quickly model the four-finger strategywith the overhead of “Missing Mama” by Eloise Greenfield. Do a read aloud of the poem andbriefly talk with students about their first thoughts and reactions to the poem. With partners (each pair needs a copy of the poem), have students reread the poem and ask themif they had questions about the poem’s meaning (for example, “Why did the uncle say he couldnot hide in his room?”). Following this brief discussion, students reread the poem, looking for the poet’s craft (forexample, “How does Greenfield’s word choice show and not tell? Why does Greenfield vary linelengths? How does it make the poem more meaningful?”). Finally, have students read the poem a fourth time, asking them how the poem made them feel:“What words or phrases did the poet use to elicit certain moods?” Encourage students to practice the “Four-Finger Poetry Overview” and read poems four times togain greater meaning (to enjoy, to look for meaning, to look for poet’s craft, and to noticefeelings). Each time students read poems, they use specific comprehension strategies.Independent Students read independently from poetry books and/or teacher-selected poems. Confer with individual students and/or provide small group instruction.Sharing/Closure Ask two or three students to share out their experiences with reading poetry four times. As aclass, add this experience to the “What We Know, What We Want to Know, What We Learned”KWL chart (see last page of this lesson).

Nathaniel TalkingBy Eloise GreenfieldMissing Mamalast year when Mama diedI went to my room to hidefrom the hurtI closed my doorwasn’t going to come outno more, neverbut my uncle he saidyou going to get pastthis painyou going topush on past this painand one of these daysyou going to feel likeyourself againI don’t miss a dayremembering Mamasometimes I crybut mostlyI think aboutthe good thingsnow

Lesson 5: Using Choral Reading to Develop FluencyConnection Remind students of the importance of silently rereading poems several times to help themunderstand better. Another way to reread, or practice rereading poetry, is by participating in achoral, a group reading where everyone in the group reads a poem as “one voice.” Todaystudents perform a choral r

s& . o Look at the poem’s first and last lines (first and last lines may give readers important . it is important to read poems four times. Remind them that the first time they read is for enjoyment; rereads allow them to dive deeper into poems .

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