Core Competencies For Interprofessional Collaborative Practice

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Core Competencies forInterprofessional Collaborative PracticeSponsored by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative*Pre-publication recommendations from the IPEC Expert PanelFebruary 2011*IPEC sponsors:American Association ofColleges of NursingAmerican Association ofColleges of Osteopathic MedicineAmerican Association ofColleges of PharmacyAmerican Dental Education AssociationAssociation ofAmerican Medical CollegesAssociation ofSchools of Public Health

Team-Based Competencies:Building a shared foundation for education intoclinical practiceIPEC and the expert panel to develop competencies for interprofessionalcollaborative practice appreciate the support of the Health Resources andServices Administration, Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation, and ABIM Foundation in sponsoring this conference to usethe recommendations of the expert panel as a stimulus for discussion ofthe core issues surrounding preparation for interprofessional, collaborativepractice.The goals for this conference are to: Examine a set of foundational competencies to guide theprofessional socialization of future health professionals in deliveringinterprofessional collaborative care that is timely and consistent inquality. Assess the relevance of these core competencies for the currentpractice of interprofessional team-based clinical care and identifyany significant gaps. Develop an action plan to catalyze the widespread implementationof these competencies in health professions education and practiceincluding identification of critical opportunities and challenges.

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeBACKGROUNDInterprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC)In 2009, six national education associations of schools of the health professions(AACN, AACOM, AACP, ADEA, AAMC, and ASPH) formed a collaborative topromote and encourage constituent efforts that would advance substantiveinterprofessional learning experiences to help prepare future clinicians for teambased care of patients.To help guide educational programs and stimulate joint learning in the sixprofessions, the collaborative convened an expert panel, with two appointeesfrom each association, to recommend a set of core competencies that will lay thefoundation for interprofessional collaborative practice.The panel began its work by reviewing all relevant statements on interprofessionalcompetency previously developed by organizations in the United States andCanada, as well as by international groups and agencies.Interprofessional Education Collaborative PartnersAmerican Association of Colleges of NursingAmerican Association of Colleges of Osteopathic MedicineAmerican Association of Colleges of PharmacyAmerican Dental Education AssociationAssociation of American Medical CollegesAssociation of Schools of Public Health 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.1

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeIPEC EXPERT PANELRECOMMENDATIONSCore Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeThe panel’s recommendations are available to serve as the stimulus for dialogueand development of an action plan to catalyze the widespread implementation ofthese competencies in health professions education and practice, with particularfocus on opportunities for and challenges to implementation.Interprofessional Competency DomainsThe panel identified four core competency domains that draw meaning fromthe specific contexts of patient care. Development and demonstration of thesecompetencies require reflection, flexibility, and adaptability to the spectrum of carecontexts – from prevention and health maintenance to acute, chronic, long-term,and palliative care – and the overall goals of care in specific situations. Thesecompetencies are a key adjunct to the general professional competencies of theindividual health professions. Values/Ethics for Interprofessional PracticeRoles/Responsibilities for Collaborative PracticeInterprofessional CommunicationInterprofessional Teamwork and Team-based CareCompetency SetsCompetency statements were drafted to include the following properties:relationship-centered, process-oriented, able to be integrated through the learningcontinuum, applicable across practice settings and professions, stated in “commonlanguage,” patient-centered, outcome driven. Graduates of health professionsprograms should be able to demonstrate ability to perform each competency in thecontext of patient care and population health.Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Core Competency Domainsoss the f u ll s p erecacrR Rfo es olr C po eso ns anPr llab ibil dac o ititic ra ese tiventTe erpa rTe mw ofeam o ssPr -b rk ionac as an atic ed d lePatient/FIsiclthna/Ees r siolu fo fes ecVaro ctirp rate PInAlnaio nss tiofe caro ni esrp u ticte m cIn om PraCpulation Cen/ PoterilyedammctruofThe Learning Continuum 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.2

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeValues/Ethics forInterprofessionalPracticeWork with individuals of other professions to maintain aclimate of mutual respect and shared values.uPlace the interests of patients and populations at the center of interprofessionalhealth care delivery.uRespect the dignity and privacy of patients while maintaining confidentialityin the delivery of team-based care.uAccept and embrace the cultural diversity and individual differences thatcharacterize patients, populations, and the health care team.uRecognize and respect the unique cultures, values, roles/responsibilities,and expertise of other health professions.uWork in cooperation with those who receive care, those who provide care, andthose who contribute to or support the delivery of prevention and health careservices.uDevelop a trusting relationship with patients, families, and other team members(Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative 2010).uDemonstrate high standards of ethical conduct and quality of care in one’scontributions to team-based care.uManage ethical dilemmas specific to interprofessional patient/populationcentered care situations.uAct with honesty and integrity in relationships with patients, families, and otherteam members.uMaintain competence in one’s own profession appropriate to scope of practice. 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.3

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeRoles/Responsibilitiesfor CollaborativePracticeUse the knowledge of one’s own role and the roles of otherprofessions to appropriately assess and address the healthcare needs of the patients and populations served.uCommunicate one’s roles and responsibilities clearly to patients, families, andother professionals.uRecognize one’s limitations in skills, knowledge, and abilities and engage otherswhen appropriate.uEngage diverse health care professionals who complement one’s ownprofessional expertise, as well as associated resources, to develop strategies tomeet specific patient care needs.uExplain the roles and responsibilities of other care providers and how the teamworks together to provide care.uUse the full scope of knowledge, skills, and abilities of available healthprofessionals and health care workers to provide safe, timely, efficient, effective,and equitable care.uCommunicate with team members to clarify each member’s responsibility inexecuting components of a treatment plan or public health intervention.uForge interdependent relationships with other professions to improve care andadvance learning.uEngage in continuous professional and interprofessional development toenhance team performance.uUse the unique and complementary abilities of all team members to optimizepatient care. 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.4

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeInterprofessionalCommunicationCommunicate with patients, families, communities, and otherhealth professionals in a responsive and responsible mannerthat supports a team approach to maintaining health andtreatment of disease.uChoose effective communication tools and techniques, including informationsystems and communication technologies, to facilitate discussions andinteractions that enhance team function.uOrganize and communicate information with patients, families, and health careteam members in a form and format that is understandable, avoiding disciplinespecific terminology when possible.uExpress one’s knowledge and opinions to team members involved in patientcare with confidence, clarity, and respect, and work to ensure commonunderstanding of information, treatment, and care decisions.uListen actively and encourage the ideas and opinions of other team members.uGive timely, sensitive, instructive feedback to others about their performance onthe team, and respond respectfully as a team member to feedback from others.uUse respectful language appropriate for a given difficult situation, crucialconversation, or interprofessional conflict.uRecognize how one’s own uniqueness, including experience level, expertise,culture, power, and hierarchy within the health care team, contributes toeffective communication, conflict resolution, and positive interprofessionalworking relationships (University of Toronto 2008).uCommunicate consistently the importance of teamwork in community andpatient-centered care. 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.5

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeInterprofessionalTeamwork andTeam-based CareApply relationship-building values and the principles of teamdynamics to perform effectively in different team roles toplan and deliver patient/population-centered care that is safe,timely, efficient, effective, and equitable.uDescribe the process of team development and the roles and practices ofeffective teams.uDevelop consensus on the ethical principles to guide all aspects of patient careand teamwork.uEngage other health professionals – appropriate to the specific care situation –in shared patient-centered problem solving.uIntegrate the knowledge and experience of other professions – appropriate tothe specific care situation – to inform care decisions, while respecting patientand community values and priorities/preferences for care.uApply leadership practices that support collaboration and team effectiveness.uActively engage self and others to identify and constructively managedisagreements about values, roles, goals, and actions that arise among healthcare professionals and with patients and families.uShare accountability appropriately with other professions, patients, andcommunities for outcomes relevant to prevention and health care.uReflect on both individual and team performance improvement.uUse process improvement strategies to increase the effectiveness ofinterprofessional teamwork and team-based care.uUse available evidence to inform effective teamwork and team-based practices.uPerform effectively on teams and in different team roles in a variety of settings. 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.6

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeSelected ResourcesAmerican Association of Collegesof Pharmacy. 2004. Center for theAdvancement of Pharmaceutical Education.Educational Outcomes ents/CAPE2004.pdfBarr, H., Koppel, I., Reeves, S., Hammick,M., and Freeth, D. (2005). EffectiveInterprofessional Education: Argument,Assumption and Evidence. Oxford: BlackwellPublishing.Barr, H. (1998). Competent to collaborate:towards a competency-based model forinterprofessional education. Journal ofInterprofessional Care, 12, 181-187.Buring, S. M., Bhushan, A., Broeseker, A.,Conway, S., Duncan-Hewitt, W., Hansen, L.,and Westberg, S. (2009). Interprofessionaleducation: definitions, student competenciesand guidelines for implementation.American Journal of PharmaceuticalEducation, 73(4), Article 59.Canadian Interprofessional HealthCollaborative. (February 2010). A NationalInterprofessional Competency sInstitute of Medicine. (2003). HealthProfessions Education: A Bridge to Quality.Washington, D.C.: The National AcademiesPress.Walsh, C. L., Gordon, M. F., Marshall,M., Wilson, F., and Hunt, T. (2005).Interprofessional capability : a developingframework for interprofessional education.Nurse Education in Practice, 5, 230-237.Page, R. L. II, Hume, A. L., Trujillo, J. M.,Leader, W. G., Vardeny, O., Neuhauser, M.M., Dang, D., Nesbit, S., and Cohen, L. J.(2009). ACCP White Paper. Interprofessionaleducation: principles and application.A framework for clinical pharmacy.Pharmacotherapy, 29(3), 145e-164e.University of Toronto, Centre for Interprofessional Education. A Framework for theDevelopment of Interprofessional EducationValues and Core Competencies. rview%20FINAL%20oct%2028.pdfSalas, E., Rosen, M. A., Burke, C. S., andGoodwin, G. F. (2009). The wisdom ofcollectives in organizations: an update ofthe teamwork competencies. In Salas, E.,Goodwin, G. F, and Burke, C. S. Teameffectiveness in complex organizations (pp.39-79). New York: Psychology Press.World Health Organization. (Winter, 2010).Framework for Action on InterprofessionalEducation & Collaborative Practice. Geneva:World Health ework action/en/index.htmlQuality and Safety Education for Nurses(QSEN), Competency KSAs, especiallyTeamwork and d 2Suter, E., Arndt, J., Arthur, N., Parboosingh,J., Taylor, E., and Deutschlander, S.(2009). Role understanding and effectivecommunication as core competenciesfor collaborative practice. Journal ofInterprofessional Care, 23, 41-51.Thistlethwaite, J., and Moran, M. (2010).Learning objectives for interprofessionaleducation (IPE): Literature review andsynthesis. Journal of InterprofessionalEducation, 24, 503-513.University of British Columbia, Collegeof Health Disciplines. (2008). The BritishColumbia Competency Framework forInterprofessional Collaboration. Vancouver:University of British petency%20Framework%20for%20IPC.pdf 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.7

Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticeCore Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative PracticePanel Roster(Panel Chair ) Madeline Schmitt, Ph.D., R.N.,F.A.A.N., Professor Emerita (of Nursing),University of RochesterSandra Carlin Andrieu, Ph.D., Professorand Associate Dean for Academic Affairs,Louisiana State University Health SciencesCenter School of DentistryAmy Blue, Ph.D., Assistant Provost forEducation and Professor of Family Medicineat the Medical University of South CarolinaThomas A. Cavalieri, D.O., F.A.C.O.I.,F.A.C.P., Dean, Endowed Chair for PrimaryCare Research, Professor of Medicine,University of Medicine and Dentistry – NewJersey-School of Osteopathic MedicineJane Marie Kirschling, D.N.S., R.N., F.A.A.N.,Dean, University of Kentucky College ofNursingKathleen Ann Long, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.,Dean, University of Florida College ofNursingSusan Mackintosh, D.O., M.P.H., Directorof Interprofessional Education, WesternUniversity of Health Sciences and AssistantProfessor, College of Osteopathic Medicineof the Pacific-Department of SocialMedicine and Healthcare LeadershipSusan Meyer, Ph.D., Associate Dean forEducation, University of Pittsburgh School ofPharmacyDeanna Wathington, M.D., M.P.H.,F.A.A.F.P., Associate Dean for Academic andStudent Affairs, Office of Academic andStudent Affairs, University of South FloridaCollege of Public HealthStaff support was provided by Alexis L.Ruffin, M.S., Director, Medical Education,at the Association of American MedicalColleges.Daniel Robinson, Pharm.D., F.A.S.H.P., Dean,College of Pharmacy, Western University ofHealth SciencesLeo E. Rouse, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean,Howard University College of DentistryAndrew A. Sorenson, Ph.D., Chair,Institutional Self-Study Task Force, Universityof South Carolina School of Medicine(affiliation at time of panel appointment)Thomas R. Viggiano M.D., M.Ed., AssociateDean for Faculty Affairs, Professor ofMedical Education and Medicine,Mayo Medical School 2011 American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges ofPharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health. May bereproduced and distributed according to the terms set forth at the end of this document.8

This document may be reproduced, distributed, publicly displayed, and modifiedprovided that attribution is clearly stated on any resulting work and it is used fornon-commercial, scientific, or educational – including professional development –purposes. If the work has been modified in any way all logos must be removed.Contact ip@aamc.org for permission for any other use.

interprofessional collaborative care that is timely and consistent in quality. Assess the relevance of these core competencies for the current practice of interprofessional team-based clinical care and identify any significant gaps. Develop

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