GCSE (9-1) Media Studies Exemplar Candidate Work - J200/01 .

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QualificationAccreditedGCSE (9–1)Exemplar Candidate WorkMEDIA STUDIESJ200For first teaching in 2017J200/01 Summer 2019examination seriesVersion 1www.ocr.org.uk/mediastudies

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkContentsIntroduction3Question 14Question 26Question 39Question 413Question 514Question 616Question 717Question 818Question 920Would you prefer aWord version?Did you know that you can savethis pdf as a Word file using AcrobatProfessional?Simply click on File Save As Other . . .and select Microsoft Word(If you have opened this PDF in your browser you willneed to save it first. Simply right click anywhere on thepage and select Save as . . . to save the PDF. Then openthe PDF in Acrobat Professional.)If you do not have access to Acrobat Professional thereare a number of free applications available that will alsoconvert PDF to Word (search for pdf to word converter).2 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkIntroductionThese exemplar answers have been chosen from thesummer 2019 examination series.OCR is open to a wide variety of approaches and allanswers are considered on their merits. These exemplars,therefore, should not be seen as the only way to answerquestions but they do illustrate how the mark scheme hasbeen applied.Please always refer to the specification -accredited-gcsemedia-studies-j200.pdf for full details of the assessmentfor this qualification. These exemplar answers shouldalso be read in conjunction with the sample assessmentmaterials and the June 2019 Examiners’ report or Reportto Centres available from Interchange https://interchange.ocr.org.uk/.The question paper, mark scheme and any resourcebooklet(s) will be available on the OCR website fromsummer 2020. Until then, they are available on OCRInterchange (school exams officers will have a login forthis and are able to set up teachers with specific logins –see the following link for further information ools/interchange/managing-user-accounts/).It is important to note that approaches to questionsetting and marking will remain consistent. At the sametime OCR reviews all its qualifications annually and maymake small adjustments to improve the performance ofits assessments. We will let you know of any substantivechanges.3 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 1[5]Exemplar 15 marksExaminer commentaryThis response accurately describes at least two examples using Media Studies terminology, with full focus on how camerawork isused to create meaning. The analysis is sophisticated, perceptive and accurate. This answer achieves 5 marks as it consistently meetsthe criteria for the level 3 band (4-5 marks).The most effective analyses are those of the low angle, the handheld camera and the close ups. This is clearly not a perfect answer –the term ‘shaky camera’ is less effective than ‘handheld camera’, for example – but does enough to achieve full marks.Note that this candidate has gained full marks with a response that does not exceed the space allocated in the exam paper, whichhelped the candidate to manage time effectively and achieve consistently high marks for all the questions on the paper.Exemplar 23 marks4 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis answer reaches the top of the level 2 band. It does contain two examples of camerawork – the establishing shot and the bird’seye view – but these are not as distinct as in the previous exemplar and neither example lends itself to effective analysis of meaning(‘establishing shot’ is not a useful example here). The analysis focuses more on the mise-en-scène shown by the camerawork ratherthan the camerawork itself, but there is just enough to constitute a ‘partially relevant response to the question’ with ‘some focus’ onmeaning, without the clear sense of connotation shown in the previous exemplar.5 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 2Exemplar 110 marks6 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis answer consistently meets the level 3 criteria in the mark scheme so achieves full marks.The question asks for ‘examples’ so at least two are required. In this case the response gives examples of the ironic use of voiceover,the effect of the focus pull, and the cross-cutting from chaotic to more serious shots.Clear judgements and conclusions are reached which reflect the analysis. The addition of a concluding paragraph, though notabsolutely necessary, does help bring this answer into focus.Again this candidate has gained full marks with a response that does not exceed the space allocated in the exam paper, whichhelped this candidate’s time management.Exemplar 25 marks7 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis is a mid-level 2 answer. The distinctive characteristic of this response is that it is descriptive – it gives two examples but does notshow detailed Media Studies knowledge and understanding of editing, as it simply describes the sequencing in the extract. It doesmake a clear judgement – that the extract is humorous – but this is only partially supported by the analysis.8 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 3Exemplar 115 marks9 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis answer consistently meets the level 3 criteria in the mark scheme so achieves full marks.This is a synoptic question, as signalled by the instruction at the beginning of the question that candidates ‘will be rewarded fordrawing together elements from your full course of study, including different areas of the theoretical framework and media contexts’.This instruction may be omitted from future synoptic questions where the question explicitly requires more than one area of theframework and/or contexts to be covered, as this question clearly does.The mark scheme states that responses are limited to a maximum of 8 marks out of 10 for AO2 (1a) – analysis – if more than onearea of the framework and/or contexts is not covered. This response clearly covers both media language (in its discussion of genreconventions and camerawork) and media industries (in its discussion of the watershed), thus enabling full marks to be given.Judgements are made throughout in the form of a nuanced and coherent evidence -based argument that leads to a conclusion.Again, the candidate gains full marks without exceeding the length suggested by the exam paper.10 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExemplar 29 marks11 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis response gains 6 marks for analysis – AO2 (1a).It applies knowledge and understanding about the watershed in analysing the lack of ‘rude language’. It analyses the use of policedrama conventions, albeit rather simply. It makes some points about representation, but these are not linked to the question. Theanalysis is supported by examples and fits the level 2 descriptor of a ‘competent and generally accurate analysis of mostly relevantaspects of the extract’. It is ‘descriptive in parts’.This response gains 3 marks for judgements and conclusions – AO2 (1b).It has a ‘partially clear’ judgement and conclusion in that it starts to make an argument for the extract both fitting and adapting theconventions then loses focus on the question and ends on a non-conclusion that does not address the question, meaning that theinformation is ‘for the most part relevant’.12 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 4[5]Exemplar 15 marksExaminer commentaryThis response gains full marks by fully explaining why audiences might prefer the two chosen ways of accessing television after liveairing. Catch up is explained in terms of the advantages of time-shifting. YouTube is explained differently in terms of interactivity viacomments. Both these explanations show a clear knowledge and understanding of the role of technology in audience consumptionand usage.Exemplar 23 marksExaminer commentaryThis response clearly states two methods of accessing non-linear television – catch up and YouTube – with partially clearexplanations, so reaches the top of level 2.13 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 5Exemplar 110 marks14 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryQuestion 5 asked for the influence of historical contexts, in the plural, so answers needed to explain at least two contexts.This response covers two media contexts – fear of espionage during the Cold War and the changing role of women in 1960s society– and gives a detailed explanation of their effect on television programmes (in this case, The Avengers’ ambiguous representation ofthe female hero and the spying villains). Historical contexts can include any social/cultural/political contexts of the historical period.The response gains 10 marks for the detail and the sophistication of the explanations.Exemplar 24 marks15 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis response covers one historical context – the Cold War – in a partially clear manner. There is some explanation of how thiscontext influences programmes with some slight reference to The Avengers, allowing this answer to rise above level 1, as it is betterthan ‘minimal’, but not very far into level 2.Question 6[1]Exemplar 11 markExaminer commentaryThis was an accessible AO1 (1a) question which required knowledge only in order to achieve one mark for a correct answer.16 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 7[4]Exemplar 14 marksExaminer commentaryOne mark each for ‘trailer’ and ‘videogame alongside the movie’, plus the second mark for each explanation of how these two waysof marketing a film work. This is not the most sophisticated answer one might expect, but enough to earn full marks.Exemplar 22 marksExaminer commentaryOne mark each for each ‘way of marketing a film’ stated only. This is a simplistic answer, but the two ways stated are distinct fromeach other.17 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 8Exemplar 18 marksExaminer commentaryThis response focuses on the theoretical perspective of active and passive audiences and uses the set product as an example of theopportunities for activity offered by video games – the ability to control characters, to choose characters, to complete missions andrise to higher levels, and to socially interact in multiplayer versions. This easily exceeds the two ways required, but none is developedin enough detail to fully demonstrate excellent knowledge and understanding, so the answer does not reach the top of the level 3band.18 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExemplar 26 marksExaminer commentaryThis response demonstrates the tendency for candidates to apply Uses and Gratifications theory to this question rather than thetheory of passive/active audiences. However, the candidate does touch upon issues of activity in the discussion of social interaction,so does successfully explain one way that audiences are active, reaching the top of the level 2 mark band. The second paragraph onentertainment attempts to make a second point about activity but this is insufficient to reach level three.19 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkQuestion 9Extract 1 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., www.warnerbros.com. Item removed due to third party copyright restrictions.Link to material: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/10/The Lego Movie poster.jpg20 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExtract 2 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., www.warnerbros.com. Item removed due to third party copyright restrictions.Link to material: vie-poster-morganfreeman-vitruvius.jpg21 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExtract 3 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., www.warnerbros.com. Item removed due to third party copyright restrictions.Link to material: ededaed57b13739c4b3892.jpg22 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExtract 4 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., www.warnerbros.com. Item removed due to third party copyright restrictions.Link to material: 73a8f40acfba6eb81--movies--top-movies.jpg23 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExtract 5 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., www.warnerbros.com. Item removed due to third party copyright restrictions.Link to material: 0d0968060679ab45c0f391.jpg24 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExemplar 17 marks25 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis response includes a representation analysis that is clearly level three standard but it only briefly implies media contexts in apassing reference to ‘men (in today’s society)’ and a reference to male leaders expected ‘in past generations’. For this reason it onlyachieves the bottom of the level 3 mark band as it does not fully meet all the criteria for this band, particularly the ‘specific, accurateand relevant reference to media contexts’ criterion.There will be at least one question across the two exam papers that asks for analysis in relation to media contexts, as this is includedin the AO2(1a) assessment objective element.Exemplar 23 marks26 OCR 2019

GCSE (9-1) Media StudiesExemplar Candidate WorkExaminer commentaryThis is a good example of a descriptive level 1 answer that, moreover, includes no reference to media contexts. This answer doesfocus on gender, although describing characterisation rather than analysing representation, so reaches the top of the level 1 banddue to its relevance. The references to voice suggest that the candidate is applying knowledge of the film trailer rather than theposters.27 OCR 2019

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GCSE (91) edia Studies C 2019 Contents Introduction 3 Question 1 4 Question 2 6 Question 3 9 Question 4 13 Question 5 14 Question 6 16 Question 7 17 Question 8 18 Question 9 20 Would you prefer a Word version? Did you know that you can save this pdf as a Word file using Acrobat Pr

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