Weaving It Together

1y ago
3.4K Views
820 Downloads
2.09 MB
128 Pages
Last View : Today
Last Download : Today
Upload by : Troy Oden
Transcription

Instructor’s ManualBooks 3 and 4Weaving It TogetherConnecting Reading and WritingThird EditionTeaching Hints and Answer KeyWriting HandbookMilada Broukal John Chapman Patricia BrennerAustralia Brazil Japan Korea Mexico Singapore Spain United Kingdom United States00238-X 001-005.indd 114/12/09 2:07 PM

Weaving It Together: ConnectingReading and Writing, Instructor’s Manual,Books 3 and 4, Third EditionMilada Broukal, John Chapman, andPatricia BrennerPublisher: Sherrise RoehrAcquisitions Editor: Thomas JefferiesCopyright 2010 Heinle, Cengage LearningALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereinmay be reproduced, transmitted, stored, or used in any form or by any meansgraphic, electronic, or mechanical, including but not limited to photocopying,recording, scanning, digitizing, taping, Web distribution, information networks,or information storage and retrieval systems, except as permitted underSection 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the priorwritten permission of the publisher.Editorial Manager: Berta de LlanoSenior Development Editor:Margarita MatteDirector of Global Marketing: Ian MartinDirector of U.S. Marketing:Jim McDonoughFor product information and technology assistance, contact us atCengage Learning Customer & Sales Support, 1-800-354-9706For permission to use material from this text or product,submit all requests online at cengage.com/permissionsFurther permissions questions can be emailed [email protected] Marketing Manager: Katie KellyMarketing Manager: Caitlin DriscollMarketing Assistant: Anders BylundDirector of Content and MediaProduction: Michael BurggrenContent Product Manager: Mark RzeszutekPrint Buyer: Susan SpencerCover Design: Page2 LLC ; Gina Petti,Rotunda DesignCompositor: Glyph InternationalISBN-13: 978-1-111-00238-1ISBN-10: 1-111-00238-XHeinle20 Channel Center StreetBoston, MA 02210USACengage Learning is a leading provider of customized learning solutions withoffice locations around the globe, including Singapore, the United Kingdom,Australia, Mexico, Brazil, and Japan. Locate your local office at:international.cengage.com/regionCengage Learning products are represented in Canada by Nelson Education, Ltd.Visit Heinle online at elt.heinle.comVisit our corporate website at www.cengage.comPrinted in the United States of America1 2 3 4 5 6 7 11 1000238-X 001-005.indd 214/12/09 2:07 PM

ContentsTo the Teacher4Sample Lesson Plan, Book 36Sample Lesson Plan, Book 49Sample Grading Rubric for Written Work12Sample Correction Symbols13Sample Student Essay with Correction Symbols14Teaching Hints and Answer Key, Book 316Writing Handbook, Book 364Teaching Hints and Answer Key, Book 474Writing Handbook, Book 4119Glossary of Grammar/Language Terms125Contents00238-X 001-005.indd 3314/12/09 2:07 PM

To the TeacherOrganization of theStudent BookWeaving It Together, Book 3, has eightunits. Each unit is divided into two chaptersrelated to the unit theme. Weaving ItTogether, Book 4, has nine chapters. Eachchapter has two readings related to a singlechapter theme. The themes have been carefullyselected to appeal to a wide range of interestsand to promote discussion and comparison ofdifferent cultures.The sequence of activities in each chapterfollows this pattern: What Do You Think? activity Pre-reading and predicting activities Reading Vocabulary activities Comprehension activities Discussion and critical thinking questions Writing skills Writing practice activitiesEach step in the sequence is important tothe final goal of enabling students to produceexcellent written English. All skills of reading,writing, generating ideas, and developingvocabulary are integrated throughout eachchapter with the aim of achieving this goal.Grading of Written WorkThe criteria you choose for grading yourstudents’ written work will vary according tothe aims in your course description. In general,your students can be expected to hand in atleast one preliminary draft of their work beforehanding in their final draft. The process ofre-writing and editing written work is4consistently emphasized in this series. Theediting tips at the end of each section will helpstudents become effective editors of their ownand each other’s work. It is also important tovalue original and thoughtful writing as well asthe amount of effort invested in the work.Here are some suggestions for correctingstudents’ written work: Use written correction symbols so thatstudents have to find their own mistakes(see page 13 for examples). Make clear your criteria for gradingwritten work. You may want to use thesame criteria each time, or you mayprefer to focus on specific points. Youmight focus on paragraph formatting forthe first assignment, for example, andthen gradually add other criteria suchas grammar, vocabulary, and content.See page 12 for possible writing rubrics,which may be adapted for your class. Have students work in pairs to checktheir essays before handing them in. Peerediting is a great way to help studentslearn to become more independent.Encourage students to use the editingchecklist at the end of each chapter inthe student book when correcting eachother’s work. Remember that a page coveredin corrections is going to be verydiscouraging for your students. If onemistake recurs frequently in an essay,correct it just once and ask the studentto find other examples of the mistake byhimself or herself. Remember to use a balance of bothpraise and criticism in your comments!To the Teacher00238-X 001-005.indd 414/12/09 2:07 PM

JournalsJournals provide an effective way ofincreasing the value of class time, as theyencourage learning outside of class. Studentscan experiment with new language they haverecently learned or read, prepare their thoughtsabout a topic before discussing it in class, orrespond in a personal way to the topics thatare discussed in class. Journals are especiallyeffective with shy or quiet students, who maynot feel comfortable speaking out in class.They are also an excellent way for you to getdirect feedback from students as to how wellthey have understood a lesson and what theirfeelings are about the topics under discussion.Journals allow teachers to communicate directlywith individual students on a regular basis.There is no doubt that the use ofjournals creates extra work for the teacher!Be realistic about how much time you canspend on reading and responding to yourstudents’ journal writing. However, the moreenthusiastic you are about journals, thebetter your students will respond, and youmay find yourself learning a great deal thatwill ultimately help you to understand yourstudents better and aid you in your classroomteaching. Suggestions for journal writing tasksare given throughout this manual.Following are some suggestions for usingjournals in your class: Use journals for freewriting. Do notcorrect spelling, grammar, or other errors. Respond with brief, supportive commentsthat show you appreciate the writer’sfeelings as an individual or engagein dialog with the student by askingquestions about what has been written. Provide a model journal entry to showstudents the length and the type ofwriting you expect to see. State your criteria for grading journals atthe beginning of the semester. You mayfind it sufficient if students complete therequired number of journal entries, or youmay want to grade effort or relevance tocourse material. It is important that thesecriteria be clear to your students beforethey begin journal writing. Set a fixed number of journal entries anda fixed number of times for journals to behanded in over the course of the semester.Internet ActivityAlso at the end of each unit is an Internetactivity, which gives students the opportunityto develop their Internet research skills. Thisactivity can be done in a classroom settingwith the guidance of the teacher or, ifstudents have Internet access, as a homeworktask leading to a classroom presentation ordiscussion. The Internet activities are designedto help students develop a critical approachto information obtained on the Internet. Wehave not suggested any specific Websites,but this manual provides suggested keywordsto be used with a search engine as well asadditional activity ideas. Go to elt.heinle.com/weavingittogether to find out more about howto do an Internet search.Note: Remember that not all Websites provideaccurate information. Students should beadvised to compare a few Websites to helpverify data. Be careful to warn students of thedangers of giving up any personal informationon Websites or downloading any files fromunknown sources.To the Teacher00238-X 001-005.indd 5514/12/09 2:07 PM

Sample Lesson PlanEach chapter in Weaving It Together, Book 3,follows a carefully designed sequence ofactivities, which guides students throughthe process of connecting reading towriting. Each chapter takes approximately2 hours of class time.Lesson 1 (60 minutes)1. Unit Photo and Warm-Up(10 minutes)The unit opens with one or morephotos reflecting the theme of theunit. Use the photos to ask questionsrelated to the general theme and togather ideas to be used later in the twochapters. The unit opener also containsthe What Do You Think? activity whichis meant to tap background knowledgeand generate interest in the topic ofthe readings in the unit. Have studentscomplete the What Do You Think?activity individually. When they havefinished, match students with a partnerand have them compare answers andagree on one answer for each item.The teaching hints for each chaptergive additional information related tothe chapter theme and creative waysof introducing the theme, therebyactivating the visual, audio, andkinesthetic learning styles of students.2. Chapter Photo, Pre-ReadingQuestions (5 minutes)Use the chapter photo to elicit morefocused discussion on the topic of thereading. Use the pre-reading questions6Book 3to introduce the specific theme ofthe chapter. Activating students’background knowledge of the topic willmake the readings easier to understand.3. Predicting (5 minutes)This activity helps students focusmore closely on the material they willencounter in the reading. The aim ofthe predicting activity is not to findthe correct answers (though they maycheck the answers after doing thereading), but to develop the skill ofanticipating what the text is going tobe about by looking at a few key items.The predicting activity in Unit 2, forexample, encourages students to guessthe meaning of words and comparetheir guesses with the meanings in thereading; the predicting activity in Unit4 encourages students to guess whatthe story is about by looking at a few ofthe key words.4. Vocabulary and ComprehensionQuestions (25 minutes)To encourage rapid and effectivereading skills, you may wish to followthis pattern:a. Ask students two or three easycomprehension questions thatguide them to the main points ofthe reading. (See the teaching hintsfor suggested questions.) Set a timelimit of about 3 minutes for studentsto find the answers quickly.b. Have students read the Vocabularyin Context questions, work inSample Lesson Plan00238-X 006-073.indd 611/12/09 8:39 PM

pairs to answer them, and thengo back to the reading to checktheir answers. Have students workin pairs to answer the VocabularyBuilding questions and thencompare their answers as a group.Ask them if they can think of anyadditional word forms for each ofthe vocabulary items. Then havestudents work individually or inpairs to complete the Vocabulary inNew Context sentences.c. Have students read the generalcomprehension questions (Lookingfor the Main Ideas), and set a timelimit of 3 minutes for a secondreading of the passage. Then givestudents 10 minutes to write theanswers or discuss them in pairs.Have them check the answers byreferring back to the passage.d. Give students a chance to searchfor and guess the meaning ofany unknown words. Then askstudents to answer the detailedcomprehension questions (Lookingfor Details) and the questions inthe section Making Inferences andDrawing Conclusions, referring backto the passage for the answers.e. Use the teaching hints for additionalideas on using the reading andextending the comprehensionactivity.5. Discussion (15 minutes)The discussion questions and criticalthinking questions give students achance to respond to the readings ona personal level by relating the themeto their own concerns and giving theirown opinions. The result is a deeperprocessing of the material, which willhelp students remember the vocabularyand the theme and develop ideas to usein their writing later. You may assignstudents to summarize ideas from thediscussion for homework.Lesson 2 (45 minutes)1. Review (10 minutes)Review the vocabulary and themesfrom the first part of the chapter.Extend the vocabulary to includewords and phrases related to students’own cultural context, if appropriate.Encourage students to keep asystematic record of new vocabularyin a notebook or on cards, addingdefinitions and example sentences tohelp them remember. To provide anopportunity for peer teaching, matchstudents with a partner and have themcompare their vocabulary notes andsuggest additional examples.2. Writing Skills (15 minutes)Present the new grammar ororganizational writing point to bepracticed in this lesson. Set a time limitfor students to complete the guidedwriting exercises. Allow plenty of timeso that all students are able to completethe task. Encourage students to readeach other’s work and offer comments.Call on students to write their sentenceson the board and invite constructivecriticism from the rest of the class.3. Writing Practice (20 minutes)Get students started on their essayby having them choose a title andSample Lesson Plan00238-X 006-073.indd 7711/12/09 8:39 PM

brainstorm ideas. Those who workfast can start writing; those who needmore time to develop ideas may discussin pairs or groups. (Note: Essays areassigned starting in Chapter 5 of Book 3.)Lesson 3 (90 minutes)Weaving It TogetherThis page is composed of a Timed Writingactivity, an Internet activity, and anopportunity to complete the What Do YouThink Now? activity after having gatheredthe information from the readings. Theseactivities provide an opportunity forfurther practice and are optional.1. Timed Writing (50 minutes)At the end of each unit, you will finda Timed Writing activity. It is optionaland may be used at different stages ofthe unit, as appropriate. Review theorganizing principles introduced in theWriting Skills section. Have studentschoose a topic that they have notwritten about in the Writing Practiceactivity. Ask students to take 5 minutesto brainstorm ideas that they wouldlike to address in their essay. Set a timelimit for students to write their essay.2. Internet Activity (30 minutes)At the end of each unit, you will findan Internet activity. One of the aims ofInternet activities is to provide studentswith an opportunity to develop theskills needed for independent study.These tasks, therefore, are designed forstudents to complete on their own time,bringing the results of their researchto class for discussion or using theinformation in their writing. Encourage8students to share tips and advice onhow to search for and to be critical ofthe information they obtain. Advisestudents to use a search enginesuch as www.google.com orwww.yahoo.com. Suggestions foralternative keywords are given in theteaching hints. Note: Be careful to warnstudents of the dangers of giving up anypersonal information on Websites ordownloading any files from unknownsources.3. What Do You Think Now?Activity (10 minutes)At the end of each unit, you will finda What Do You Think Now? activity.This activity provides an opportunityfor final discussion of the topic andthe readings covered. Have studentscomplete the activity individuallywithout referring to the readings. Matchstudents with a partner and have themcompare their answers and identify oneitem of information that they stronglyagree or disagree with. Do a class check.Elicit opinions from student pairs andwrite them on the board. Choose one ortwo of the most prevalent opinions andhave a class discussion.Journal (optional)The journal can be used in a variety ofways—as a personal record the studentuses for brainstorming ideas; as a dialogbetween the teacher and the student;or as a class journal in which eachmember of the class takes a turn writinghis or her opinions and ideas. Howeveryou decide to use the journal, you willfind many suggestions for journalwriting topics in the teaching hints.Sample Lesson Plan00238-X 006-073.indd 811/12/09 8:39 PM

Sample Lesson PlanEach chapter in Weaving It Together, Book 4,follows a carefully designed sequence ofactivities, which guides students throughthe process of connecting reading towriting. Each chapter has two readings ona related theme. The whole chapter takesapproximately 3 hours of class time.b.Reading 1 (45 minutes)1. Chapter photo and What DoYou Think? activity (5 minutes)c.Use the chapter photo and pre-readingquestions to introduce the theme ofthe first reading. Activating students’background knowledge of the topicwill make the readings easier tounderstand.2. Pre-Reading activity(10 minutes)The pre-reading activity helps studentsfocus on the general theme of thechapter. In Chapter 1, for example, theactivity is about other famous artists.In Chapter 2, the activity focuses ongeneral knowledge about Englishspelling.3. Vocabulary and comprehensionquestions (15 minutes)To encourage rapid and effectivereading skills, you may wish to followthis pattern:a. Ask students two or three easycomprehension questions thatd.e.Book 4guide them to the main points ofthe reading. (See the teaching hintsfor suggested focus questions.) Seta time limit of about 3 minutes forstudents to find the answers quickly.Have students read the Vocabularyin Context questions, work inpairs to answer them, and then goback to the reading to check theiranswers.Have students work in pairs toanswer the Vocabulary Buildingquestions and compare theiranswers as a group. Then havestudents work individually to writesentences for the Vocabulary in NewContext activity. Match studentswith a partner for peer editing. Thenelicit example sentences from pairs.Have students read the generalcomprehension questions (Lookingfor the Main Ideas) and set a timelimit of 3 minutes for a secondreading of the passage. Then givestudents 10 minutes to write theanswers or discuss them in pairs.Have them check the answers byreferring back to the passage.Give students a chance to searchfor and guess the meaning ofany unknown words. Then askstudents to answer the detailedcomprehension questions(Skimming and Scanning forDetails) and the questions in thesection Making Inferences andDrawing Conclusions, referring backto the passage for the answers.Sample Lesson Plan00238-X 006-073.indd 9911/12/09 8:39 PM

f. Use the teaching hints for additionalideas on using the reading andextending the comprehensionactivity.4. Discussion and critical thinkingquestions (15 minutes)The discussion and critical thinkingquestions give students a chanceto respond to the readings on apersonal level by relating the themeto their concerns and giving theirown opinions. The result is a deeperprocessing of the material, which willhelp students remember the vocabularyand the theme and develop ideas touse in their writing later. You may askstudents to summarize ideas from thediscussions for homework.Reading 2 (90 minutes)1. Review (5 minutes)Review the vocabulary and themesfrom the previous reading. Extendthe vocabulary to include wordsand phrases related to students’own cultural context, if appropriate.Encourage students to keep asystematic record of new vocabularyin a notebook or on cards, addingdefinitions and example sentences tohelp them remember. To provide anopportunity for peer teaching, matchstudents with a partner and have themcompare their vocabulary notes andsuggest additional example

Weaving It Together, Book 4, has nine chapters. Each chapter has two readings related to a single chapter theme. The themes have been carefully selected to appeal to a wide range of interests and to promote discussion and comparison of different cultures.