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WALC - Affiliated Rehab

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WALC 1TMWorkbook of Activities for Language and CognitionAphasia RehabbySkillsIMatching and identificationIFollowing commandsIVocabularyIAnswering questionsIFunctional languageKathryn J. TomlinAgesI16 through adultGradesIhigh school and upEvidence-Based PracticeAccording to the Clinical Guidelines of the Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists(www.rcslt.org/resources, 2005) and the National Stroke Association (2006), the following therapyprinciples are supported.ICommunication, both verbal and nonverbal, is a fundamental human need. Meeting this needby facilitating and enhancing communication in any form can be vital to a patient’s well-being.ITherapy should include tasks that focus on semantic processing, including semantic cueing ofspoken output, semantic judgments, categorization, and word-to-picture matching.ITherapy may target the comprehension and production of complex, as well as simple, sentence forms.ITherapy should be conducted within natural communication environments.IRehabilitation is an important part of recovering from a stroke, and the goal is to regain asmuch independence as possible.This book incorporates the above principles and is also based on expert professional practice.Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.LinguiSystems, Inc.3100 4th AvenueEast Moline, IL 61244-9700800-776-4332FAX: 800-577-4555E-mail: service@linguisystems.comWeb: linguisystems.comAll of our products are copyrighted to protect the fine work of ourauthors. You may only copy the worksheets as needed for your ownuse with clients. Any other reproduction or distribution of the pagesin this book is prohibited, including copying the entire book to useas another primary source or “master” copy.The enclosed CD is for your personal use and convenience. It isunlawful to copy this CD or store its content on a multi-user network.Printed in the U.S.AISBN 10: 0-7606-0424-XISBN 13: 978-0-7606-0424-3

About the AuthorFor more than 25 years, Kathryn J. Tomlin, M.S., CCC-SLP, hasworked with children, adolescents and adults with impairments incommunication, oral-motor skills and swallowing due to variousetiologies. She is also the author of these therapy books:zzzzzzKathy & ZanmiWALC 2–Cognitive RehabWALC 8–Word FindingWALC 9–Verbal and Visual ReasoningWALC 10–MemoryWALC 11–Language for Home ActivitiesThe Source for Apraxia TherapyZanmi, Kathy’s Samoyed, goes to work with her to encouragethe clients. They enjoy feeding and spending time with Zanmi,and Zanmi distracts them from their present situations and theircommunication difficulties. Everybody wins!AcknowledgmentMuch thanks to all of my co-workers, friends, family, and especially my clients, who have taughtme so much.Illustrations by Tony Vandercar and Margaret WarnerWALC 1: Aphasia RehabCopyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Table of ContentsIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Unit 1: Matching and IdentificationIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22Unit 2: Following CommandsIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50Following Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51Unit 3: VocabularyIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Opposites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Synonyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .606167737995Unit 4: Answering QuestionsIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110Listening for Embedded Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111Answering Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124Unit 5: Functional LanguageIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sentence Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Paragraphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Reading and Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157158191200Answer Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214WALC 1: Aphasia RehabCopyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

IntroductionThe exercises in WALC 1 (Workbook of Activities for Language and Cognition): AphasiaRehab emerged as was working with adolescent and adult clients who exhibited difficultieswith auditory and visual comprehension and/or oral and written expression. The majorityof these clients exhibited aphasia due to stroke or head injury. These exercises have alsoproved to be very useful with clients who have language difficulties resulting from variouspathologies (e.g., central auditory processing disorders) as well as neurologic changes dueto illnesses (e.g., Lyme disease).The underlying principle for the materials in WALC 1: Aphasia Rehab is based on teachingprocesses as opposed to content. My focus has been on teaching strategies and I havediscovered that few publications contain a sufficient amount of stimulus items to insureacquisition of the strategy. Most available material does not provide an internal hierarchicalorder which reflects an increase in degree of difficulty within a task and from task to taskas the client builds upon the strategies of processes he is relearning how to use.The exercises in WALC 1: Aphasia Rehab have been used for many years by speechlanguage pathologists and other specialists (e.g., cognitive therapists, occupationaltherapists) with a wide variety of clients. The content and format have proved to bean excellent therapy supplement for trained professionals, clients' families, and clients.However one uses WALC 1: Aphasia Rehab, it is my sincere hope that the exercises arehelpful and that each and every client will benefit from having used them.KathyWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab5Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Unit 1: Matching and IdentificationA client’s ability to understand and complete matching and identification tasks is oftenimpaired as a result of aphasia. The client may have lost the ability to determine howshapes, numbers, letters, or words are alike or different. A client may no longer understandwhat the concept of matching means.For clients with anomia, the matching and identification tasks stimulate expressive language,making the use of these activities especially helpful for them.The matching and identification tasks begin simply, with single, more concrete items (thatare not loaded with meaning) and progress to more complex tasks. The tasks are alsodesigned to improve the client’s ability to process auditory, graphic, and visual material.Overall, the tasks in this section are receptive but can be used to build other skills, likeexpressive language, visual recognition, and fine motor skills.Therapy SuggestionsUse the activities as they are to improve the ability to understand the task.zSay or describe the shapes or pictures as the client completes the activity with amotor response like pointing. This process often stimulates the client to repeat thename of the object spontaneously.zUse these activities to help the client regain the understanding that symbols standfor words, words stand for objects, and letters stand for sounds — necessary skillsfor reading.zRepeat the activities matching a picture to words and sentences to improve theclient’s word finding skills.zHelp improve visual identification and memory skills by covering pictures and askingthe client to recall visual information he saw on the page.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab6Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Match the shapes.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab7Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the shape in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the row.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab8Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the shape in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the row.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab9Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Match the numbers.1524772416492473313149685216816734Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab10Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the number in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the 91010987Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab11Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the number in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the 694510940261086109900100900800700Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab12Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Match the letters.ambeehyvhrssvgmagyrbUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab13Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the letter in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the unecUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab14Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the letter in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the UJOCUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab15Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Match the objects.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab16Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the object in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the row.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab17Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the object in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the row.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab18Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Match the atemomcatgatecutrunbadUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab19Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the word in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the pokegushyelpjumpunderunderneverevencoatUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab20Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Look at the word in the box on the left. Find one just like it in the morningmethod sshealthyhopefulhospitalUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab21Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Point to the:ladderbelthammerearpantsUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab22Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Point to the:ringroadglasstelevisioncupUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab23Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Point to the:pancamerabroomairplanehatUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab24Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Point to the:clockknifesundollarrulerUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab25Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Point to the:scissorshouseradiobedglassesUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab26Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the word that names each picture.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia ghtcaplampbeltlightbulbpainthatladder27Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the word that names each picture.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia ootteethhandeyesringmonthdiamondclock28Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the word that names each picture.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia etalbaglockgarbage cankey29Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the word that names each picture.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia readwalkclothingrugmilktravelsalt yright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the word that names each picture.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia aseballtruckrun31Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the one you:use to writesit onreadcan driveuse to tell timeUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab32Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the one you:use to light up a roomwear on your footsleep inuse to diguse to eatUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab33Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the one you:wearsee in the sky during the dayuse to measuredrive cars onuse to keep your hands warmUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab34Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the one you:can climbuse to writeopen to go into a roomuse to open a lockeatUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab35Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the one you:use to bakeuse to pound nailssmell withcan rideuse for shadeUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab36Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the one:that symbolizes the United Statesthat secures somethingyou could own as a petyou use to stiryou use to clean your teethUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab37Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Point to:the arrow and the suitcasethe letter and the arrowthe boot and the toothbrushthe suitcase and the bootthe toothbrush and the letterUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab38Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Point to:the number five and the needlethe sink and the fishthe stove and the sinkthe needle and the stovethe fish and the number fiveUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab39Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Identify one object in the scene, then two objects, then three objects.carpondtreehouseroadstop signgaragebusheswindowsdoorroofdrivewayNow identify the objects by their function.the one you drivethe one that has fishthe one you drive onUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehabthe one you live inthe one that growsthe one that tells you to stop40Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Identify one object in the scene, then two objects, then three floorwalllampshadeNow identify the objects by their function.the one that is a petthe one you sit onthe one that hangs on the wallUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehabthe one that has leavesthe one that shows moviesthe ones you read41Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

DRUG STOREPETSBOOKSDELICATESSENleSaIdentify one object in the scene, then two objects, then three objects.carpet storesundelidrug storecloudsbookstorebikeroaddoorwindowroofsale signawningtiresNow identify the objects by their function.thethethethethethethethethethetheone that shinesstore where you can buy a petone you pedalone made of glassstore where you can buy novelsstore where you can buy lunch meatsone that uses gasstore that sells prescription medicineone a car drives onentrance of a storeobjects that produce rainUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab42Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Identify one object in the scene, then two objects, then three eezerovenfaucetdoor handleburnerswallcounterfloorknobsNow identify the objects by their function.thethethethethethethetheone you wash dishes inone that keeps milk chilledone that tells timeplace where you store dishesappliance that cooks hamburgersplace where you would store silverwareplace where food is kept frozenobject that would bake a cakeUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab43Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Identify one object in the scene, then two objects, then three lkwindowssnowroofdrivewaygarage doorcurtainsstepsskyNow identify the objects by their function.thethethetheone that stores carsone that shinesthing that leads up to the front doorone that smokesUnit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab44the ones that are covered with snowthe objects that are made of glassthe roadway that leads to the garageCopyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the sentence that describes each picture.The book is on the table.The woman is walking.The book is under the table.The woman is running.The man is cooking.The tree has a few leaves.The man is reading.The tree has lots of leaves.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab45Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the sentence that describes each picture.The shirt is striped.The dog is sleeping.The shirt is plain.The cat is sleeping.The boy is playing with a truck.The glass is full.The boy is playing with a ball.The glass is empty.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab46Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the sentence that describes each picture.The woman is taller than the man.This woman is sleeping.The man is taller than the woman.This woman is working.The window is closed.They are playing on the beach.The window is open.They are playing on the floor.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab47Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the sentence that describes each picture.The car has a flat tire.The pencil is broken.The car needs gas.The pencil is short.The flame is out.The garbage can is standing up.The flame is burning.The garbage can fell.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab48Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Find the sentence that describes each picture.The suitcase is closed.The man is mowing the lawn.The suitcase is open.The man is planting a garden.He is getting on the subway.The hamburger is hot.He is getting on the bus.The coffee is hot.Unit 1 – Matching and IdentificationWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab49Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Unit 2: Following CommandsA client with aphasia may have difficulty following oral and written directions for severalreasons.zFollowing directions is a multimodality task. First, the client hears or reads thedirection and then needs to understand it. Once the client understands, hemakes the appropriate motor response. All in all, that’s complex processing!zWhen the motor response is written — circling, underlining, etc. — a client withaphasia may perseverate or respond in one way instead of accurately followingthe directions.zSome directions require a client to exclude an item, categorize information, orfind similarities or differences. Sometimes, directions require a client to processdirections or commands that are embedded in other information. As the languageand thinking load increases, the task of following directions becomes more difficult.Therapy SuggestionszReview common direction words and practice the appropriate motor responsebefore beginning this section of activities. For example, ask the client to drawa circle, a box, or a line. Write examples on index cards for future reference.zReview the meaning of selected content words to improve the comprehensionof directions.zHelp the client associate directions to appropriate body parts before askinghim to follow the direction. For example, when he hears the word wink, whatbody part does he associate?zDiscuss the relevance of categorization tasks, functions of objects, parts ofwholes, similarities, and differences before asking the client to follow directionsrequiring these thinking tasks.Unit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab50Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Close your eyes.16. Point to the light.2. Give me your hand.17. Smile.3. Point to the floor.18. Point to the table.4. Open your mouth.19. Bend your arm.5. Point to your foot.20. Point to your head.6. Look to the right.21. Make a fist.7. Point to the wall.22. Nod your head.8. Say your first name.23. Cross your fingers.9. Give me a pencil.24. Point to the chair.10. Point to the ceiling.25. Give me the book.11. Wink.26. Point to the corner.12. Raise your arm.27. Blink your eyes.13. Lift up your foot.28. Point to your nose.14. Point to your arm.29. Look to the left.15. Look at the ceiling.30. Shake my hand.Unit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab51Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Open your mouth. Now, cover your mouth.2. Blink your eyes. Now, touch your cheek.3. Make a fist. Now, give me your hand.4. Wave. Now, put your hand on the table.5. Look at the light switch. Now, point to the ceiling.6. Close your eyes. Now, smile.7. Give me the pencil. Now, point to the paper.8. Touch your knee. Now, lift up your foot.9. Point to yourself. Now, say your first name.10. Touch your arm. Now, rub your shoulder.11. After raising your arm, touch your chest.12. Look at the door. Now, shake your head.13. After winking, close both eyes.14. Scratch your arm. Now, put your hands together.15. Reach for the ceiling. Now, put your hand in your lap.Unit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab52Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Close your eyes. Now, shake your head.2. Touch your knee. Now, scratch your leg.3. Give me the pencil. Now, nod your head.4. Touch your nose. Now, blink your eyes.5. Give me the book. Now, put your hand on the table.6. Look at the ceiling. Now, point to the light.7. Touch your mouth. Now, say your name.8. Give me your hand. Now, look at the door.9. Smile. Now, touch your stomach.10. Point to the door. Now, look at me.11. Take my hand. Now, laugh.12. Look at your hand. Now, make a fist.13. Pick up the pencil. Now, give it to me.14. Scratch your elbow. Now, rub your arm.15. Raise your arm. Now, touch your shoulder.Unit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab53Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Circle the ashsofa2. Cross out the fruit.window3. Underline the food.boat4. Draw an X through the heaviest item.truck5. Circle the month.Tuesday6. Draw a box around the number.potatoparty7. Draw a line over the state.Ohiopicture8. Make a check mark next to the piece of furniture.bookUnit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehabstreetwater54chairCopyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Underline the day of the buslogknockleague2. Draw a line over the beverage.rock3. Circle the hardest item.rock4. Underline the meat.porch5. Cross out the coin.wind6. Put a check mark next to the bird.changeskirt7. Underline a type of transportation.sleephouse8. Draw a star over the writing instrument.lipsUnit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehabpencil55Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Underline the ensoapcleanweightoven2. Cross out the thing you read.pantsranch3. Draw a star next to the one that is red.dirt4. Circle the tallest.person5. Draw a line over the youngest.babydoctor6. Draw a box around the one that is sharp.cane7. Cross out the animal.cat8. Put a check mark next to the lightest.rockUnit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehabfeather56Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Circle the animal. Then, underline the piece of furniture.cuptigersofapaper2. Draw a line over the fruit. Then, cross out the room.plumcancheesekitchen3. Draw a star in front of the sport. Then, put a check mark next to the tree.chairbaseballmusicmaple4. Draw a box around the vegetable. Then, underline the color.celerycarblueearth5. Draw a line through the country. Then, circle the body part.shoearmdishJapan6. Cross out the meat. Then, draw a box around the object you write with.beefpencildoctorTuesday7. Underline the job. Then, draw a star after the day of the week.Fridaycoatwatchplumber8. Draw an X through the coin. Then, underline the fish.lampUnit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehabhomequarter57flounderCopyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Circle the dessert. Then, cross out the drink.shoewatermasterice cream2. Draw a line under the flower. Then, draw a box around the jewelry.roseiceringwondersevennoon3. Underline the number. Then, circle the toy.towelball4. Draw a line over the tool. Then, underline the part of the face.bridestorehammernose5. Draw a box around the residence. Then, put a check mark next to the state.Ohiocementhomewalk6. Circle the snack. Then, draw a line through the relative.brotherwonderpretzelsplane7. Underline a type of transportation. Then, draw an X through the ocean.wingtruckcheekAtlantic8. Circle the city. Then, draw a star in front of a type of weather.taintUnit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia RehabrainyBoston58fireCopyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Follow these directions.1. Underline the softest one. Then, circle the one that floats.wooddimecottonpebble2. Draw a box around the coldest one. Then, cross out the shortest one.inchnationaltigerice cream3. Draw a star behind the blue one. Then, draw a line over the animal.sevenprogramblueberryskunk4. Circle the heaviest one. Then, draw a check mark next to the one that you tie.shoelaceleafcarTV5. Cross out the one that you drink. Then, draw a box around the one you hear.equipmentjuicemoonsound6. Draw an X in front of the one that is married. Then, circle the one that can fly.weekwifecrowdog7. Cross out the one that grows. Then, draw a box around the one that is red.stop signmissinganchorplant8. Draw a line over the tallest one. Then, draw a star in front of the brightest one.sunUnit 2 – Following CommandsWALC 1: Aphasia Rehabbellriver59treeCopyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Unit 3: VocabularyOne of the most overt signs of aphasia is a client’s inability to use vocabulary and languageskills effectively. Some clients with aphasia find their ability to perceive and comprehendauditory or visual messages significantly reduced. Because of this, they respond slowly.Other clients comprehend only parts of the auditory or visual message. Because they donot understand the whole message, their responses are incorrect or tangential.Some clients may be able to produce a mental image of what they want to say, yet be unableto recall the necessary words. This difficulty is usually “process” rather than “word” specific.Clients will know what they want to say but tell you they “just can’t say it.” At other times,they are able to use the same words or phrases correctly.The tasks in this unit are designed to help the clients compensate for deficits in vocabulary.Therapy SuggestionszAfter completing a task that lists choices, review it with the answers covered.Show the choices when necessary.zAfter the client chooses an answer, have him write the answer next to the stimulusitem. Then have him read the word aloud.zReview the meaning of the content words in all activities to improve comprehension,the ability to make choices, and word retrieval skills. Vary the rate of presentation.A slower presentation rate will reduce the effects of perseveration and improveprocessing. Adequate response time allows the client to mentally or verballyrehearse a response before expressing it.zEncourage verbal rehearsal initially and, over time, gradually shift to mentalrehearsal of responses.Unit 3 – VocabularyWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab60Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Choose the opposite.1. up anddownoverunder2. left andexitquickright3. old andhundredyoungancient4. big andwaternearlittle5. clean andsparklingdirtyhouse6. empty andopenboxfull7. man andwomansirhusband8. rough andbumpyroadsmooth9. mine andfeelingyourscoal10. short andminutepersontall11. in andsideouton12. cloudy andskysunnyrainUnit 3 – VocabularyWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab61Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Choose the opposite.1. all andnoneoutsome2. him andbrothhisher3. wet anddrydampwater4. north andsouthstormpole5. peace andcountrywartime6. question andqueryteacheranswer7. more andmilklessmost8. whisper andquietvoiceshout9. adult andchildparentlate10. brother andfriendteachersister11. straight andlinecrookedroadpennydullsparkle12. shiny andUnit 3 – VocabularyWALC 1: Aphasia Rehab62Copyright 2002 LinguiSystems, Inc.

Choose the opposite.1. brave andcourageoussoldiercowardly2. rude andinterruptpoliteshout3. innocent andtrialjudgeguilty4. calm andlakepeacefulnervous5. mend andbreakfixglass6. succeed andleavefailwin7. permanent andhairlicensetemporary8. general andarmycommonspecific9. renew andexpiresubscriptionmagazine10. solid andcubeliquidtable11. before andaboveafternine1

Therapy may target the comprehension and production of complex, as well as simple, sen-tence forms. Therapy should be conducted within natural communication environments. Rehabilitation is an important part of recovering from a stroke, an