Grade Historical Fiction DRAFT Mini-Lessons At A Glance

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DRFiction6 HistoricalMini-Lessons at a GlanceAFTGradeMentor Historical Fiction Collection: The Strong and the Weak/Tomb Robbers!Mini-Lesson MenuIntroduce the GenreModel the Writing ProcessPageBLM1. Finding topics for historical fiction22. Read aloud a mentor historical fiction story43. Read aloud a mentor historical fiction story64. Analyze the features of a historical fiction story85. R ecognize how writers sequence events from the problem to thesolution in a historical fiction story1. B rainstorm ideas using social studies learning as inspiration102. Evaluate your ideas to narrow the focus1423. U sing your research to organize your ideas on a historical fictionstory map4. Focus on setting and find words to describe the picture(s)163, 41851125. Revise for voice6. Edit for paragraphing and indents7. Create a catchy titleAuthor’s Craft1. Choose words to deepen meaning2. Use specific and accurate words3. Select striking words and phrases4. Deciding when to start a new paragraph5. Choosing the right voice: first or third personGrammar and Conventions1. Present perfect tense2. Present perfect tense3. Past perfect tense4. Past perfect tense5. Using semicolons6. Using em dashes and ellipsesResearch1. Gathering sensory details about a historical settingManagement & Assessment ToolsManagementHome Connection LetterAssessmentAssessment Historical Fiction ChecklistPageHistorical Fiction Unit Class Status SheetHistorical Fiction Evaluation RubricHistorical Fiction Student Self-Reflection Sheet*A dvanced preparation for this mini-lesson may include gathering visual props or writing model and/or practice text on chart paper (if you are not using the interactivewhiteboard resources).

INTRODUCE THE GENREMINI-LESSON 1Mini-Lesson ObjectivesIn this mini-lesson, teachers will: Launch the historical fiction unit ofstudy. Establish themselves as historicalfiction writing mentors bydisplaying historical fiction booksshowing a range of topics. Discuss the sample historical fictionbooks to show that historical fictionwriters often have a personalconnection to their topic.Students will: Use books, photographs,mementos or family stories tomake connections to historicalperiods or events that interestthem. Share ideas with a partner andthen with the whole class.Mini-Lesson PreparationMaterials Needed Historical fiction books; maps toshow where the books are set Interactive whiteboard resourcesAdvanced PreparationDuring the model portion of thislesson, use books to introduce therange of topics in historical fiction.Display some or all of the followingtitles, all winners of the NewberyMedal or the Scott O’Dell Award forHistorical Fiction: Crispin, the Crossof Lead by Avi; The Game of Silenceby Louise Erdrich; Out of the Dust byKaren Hesse; Under the Blood RedSun by Graham Salisbury; One CrazySummer by Rita Garcia Williams.2 Grade 6 Historical FictionFINDING TOPICS FORHISTORICAL FICTIONIntroduce Historical Fiction WritingDisplay a variety of historical fiction books. Use the sample thinkaloud below as a model of how to talk to students about the range oftopics in historical fiction. Use the sample books to explain that writersof historical fiction usually have some personal connection to theirsubjects.Sample think-aloud. Say: I want to share some great historical fiction bookswith you. The stories in these books are set in different time periods and covera wide range of topics. “Crispin, The Cross of Lead” by Avi is about a boy, in14th-century medieval England, who is accused of a crime he did not commit.“The Game of Silence” by Louise Erdrich tells the story of a Native Americangirl from the Ojibwe tribe living in 1850 on an island in Lake Superior. “Outof the Dust” by Karen Hesse takes place during the great dust storms inOklahoma in the 1930s; “Under the Blood Red Sun” by Graham Salisburyis about a Japanese American boy, in Hawaii in 1941, who witnesses thebombing of Pearl Harbor and then experiences ethnic tension after the UnitedStates enters World War II. “One Crazy Summer” by Rita Garcia Williamstells about an eleven-year-old girl’s experiences of an important moment inAfrican American history during the summer of 1968 in Oakland, California. Ifind it amazing how authors choose so many different historical time periodsin which to set their works. I’m amazed because to write their stories in thesetime periods, they have to immerse themselves into what was happening in aparticular place at a particular time.Say: You may wonder how writers of historical fiction come up with such awide range of topics. Several authors of the books I just mentioned got theirideas from their family history or state history. Rita Garcia Williams wasborn in 1957 and would have been eleven in 1968, like Delphine, the maincharacter in her book. The author and her character were both born in NewYork. On her website, the author says she grew up very aware of the eventsof the 1960s, which is the subject of her novel. Louise Erdrich is a memberof the Ojibwe tribe, which is also called the Chippewa. Nearly all her booksare about Native American characters and aspects of her heritage. GrahamSalisbury is not Japanese, but he grew up in Hawaii on the islands of Oahuand Hawaii. It is very common for writers to have a personal connection tothe topics they pick for their historical fiction stories. 2012 Benchmark Education Company, LLC

Mini-Lesson OneIntroduce the Purpose and Audience for Historical Fiction Make Cultural ConnectionsSay: You may wonder about the purpose of historical fiction. Why not justread straight history textbooks or nonfiction books instead? I like to readhistorical fiction because it helps me understand how people lived and felt,long before I was born. Times change, but human feelings remain prettymuch the same. As a writer, when you blend history and fiction together in astory, you can bring the past alive in a way that informational writing abouthistorical facts can’t do. It’s also fun and entertaining to become absorbedin an adventure from the past. I imagine that the audience for the historicalfiction I like to read and write includes anyone interested in learning aboutthe lives and adventures of people who lived in a particular time and placelong ago.This unit provides an excellent opportunityto acknowledge the cultural diversityin your classroom and to encouragestudents to share stories based on theirbackgrounds and cultures. Say: We comefrom diverse backgrounds and places.Our differences offer us a wealth of topicsfor our historical fiction stories. Personalconnections to family and cultural originscan help us make connections to history.Strategies to Support ELsBeginningMeet with beginning ELs one-on-onewhile other students work with partners.Display illustrated historical fiction booksInvite students to work with a partner. Each student should tell their partnerto build the concept of historical fiction.about a historical period or event in which they have a particular interest andPoint to one of the books. Say: This bookwhy. Encourage students to think about historical events, settings, and timeis historical fiction. This book is aboutperiods that have some significance to their family history or culture. The. Display illustrations that show thepartner listening should be prepared to retell this connection to the class.time and place where the story is set. Invitestudents to tell you the historical timeUse “Strategies to Support ELs” to assist English learners or other students who and place by saying “This book is aboutneed support.”Practice Telling Historical Fiction Story Ideas OrallyShare Historical Connections with the ClassInvite volunteers to tell about what part of history their partner is interested in.Use one or more of the following questions to engage students in discussionabout the practice activity.Storyteller What is your personal interest in this historical period or event?Listener What questions do you have about your partner’s idea so far, that youmight like to see answered in a historical fiction story about this topic?Connect and Transfer to Independent WritingSay: We come from a wide range of places and cultures, which all existedbefore we were born. In the next several weeks, we will be making personalconnections to historical subjects to help us bring the past alive in ourhistorical fiction. 2012 Benchmark Education Company, LLCIntermediatePair ELs with fluent English speakersduring the partner practice. Display simplesentence frames on chart paper and modelhow students can use them to describea historical period and/or a connectionbetween a historical period or event andtheir family or culture. For example:I am interested in .A long time ago, people used to .My ancestors .AdvancedPair ELs with fluent English speakersduring partner practice.All LevelsIf you have students whose first languageis Spanish, share these English/Spanishcognates to help them understand thelesson focus: ancestor/el antepasado;connection/la conexión; historical/histórico(a).Grade 6 Historical Fiction3

INTRODUCE THE GENREMINI-LESSON 2Historical FictionReaders’op titles in this set.Early River Civilizations The Strong and the Weak:Hammurabi’s CodeTomb Robbers! A Story ofAncient EgyptThe Strongand the Weak:Hammurabi’s Codey AtlantisEl DoradoTomb Robbers! Campus AttackSabotage!Egypt Ra Creates the WorldIsis and OsirisThe Death and Rebirth of OsirisA Story of Ancient Egypt Next!Observing the Ants Jake Digs a HoleLuke and the Bug Man Dream PilotErasednyby Amanda JenkinsREAD ALOUD A MENTORHISTORICAL FICTION STORYIntroduce the Mentor Historical Fiction StorySay: As we become writers of historical fiction, we can learn a lot about thegenre by reading or listening to historical fiction written by other authors.Today I’m going to read you a historical fiction story by Amanda Jenkins, whohas also written several young adult novels. As I read, pay attention to somekey features of her story, including the setting, the characters and the mainevents. These are features of any fiction story. However, writers of historicalfiction use these features in special ways. You will be using these features inyour historical fiction stories, too.Mentor TextMini-Lesson ObjectivesIn this mini-lesson, students will:Say: The title of the story is “The Strong and the Weak: Hammurabi’s Code.”The title contains a pair of opposites. I wonder what that has to do withHammurabi’s Code? What does the title make you think of? Allow students toshare their predictions or “I wonder” questions. Listen to a historical fiction readaloud to learn that historical fictionhas an authentic historical setting,characters that lived or could havelived in the setting, and events thatoccurred or could have occurred.You may wish to display the story using the interactive whiteboard resourcesso that students can follow along as you read. Discuss the setting, characters, andevents described in the mentor text.Read Aloud the Mentor Historical Fiction StoryMini-Lesson PreparationMaterials Needed Mentor text: “The Strong and theWeak: Hammurabi’s Code” Interactive whiteboard resourcesIf your class includes English learners or other students who would benefitfrom vocabulary and oral language development to comprehend the narrative,use “Make the Mentor Text Comprehensible for ELs.”Read aloud the text, stopping at some or all of the places indicated (or at otherpoints you choose) to highlight three key features of a historical fiction story:1. The story describes an authentic historical setting.2. The characters lived or could have lived in the setting.3. The events did occur or could have occurred.Authentic Historical SettingPage 8, after second paragraph. Say: I’ve only read two paragraphs, butalready I know a lot about where and when the story takes place. The authoruses details like “the temple complex” and “the streets of Babylon” to tell methe story is set in the Middle East in ancient times. I know Babylon must be amagnificent city because the author says the temple complex has many greatartisans. The details about Ditanu’s working arrangement with Belshanu alsotell me about the setting. Stone carving is an ancient skill. In those early times,it was normal for a young boy who wanted to learn a trade to become anapprentice by working and living at the home of a master craftsman. Now I’llthink about what I know about these two characters and read on to find outmore.Details About Characters4 Grade 6 Historical Fiction 2012 Benchmark Education Company, LLC

Mini-Lesson TwoPage 8, after second paragraph. Say: The setting tells me the characters livein ancient times, but they also have qualities that remind me of people today.Ditanu is hardworking, talented, and conscientious because the author sayshe “placed the chisel precisely where [Belshanu] wanted it.” I also know thatBelshanu has an eye for talent and believes in giving people chances becausethe author says Belshanu “had seen something in the boy he could bring out.”Belshanu must be a good teacher, too, since Ditanu is doing such good work.Details About CharactersPage 10, after third paragraph. Say: The name Wife of Hudu-libbi tells methis character has to live according to the rules of her time. But Ditanu’s firstthoughts about her tell me she is also like people living today: “No one daredtell the widow she should stay quietly at home.” I know she is intimidatingand proud. Also, she can read at a time when few men and fewer women hadthat skill. This tells me she is smart, like plenty of people today.Details About Events that Occurred or Could Have OccurredAfter page 10. Say: The Wife of Hudu-libbi comes into Belshanu’s workshopto order a votive figure. This is an event that could have occurred at the timethis story is set. In the fifth paragraph, the author explains the rules andcustoms of the time that resulted in wealthy people ordering stone statuesof themselves. In the sixth paragraph, the author blends historical fact withfiction. There really was a stone stele engraved with Hammurabi’s laws andsomeone had to carve it. I can believe that Belshanu could have been the manwho carved Hammurabi’s code.Respond Orally to the Mentor Historical Fiction StoryAfter reading the story aloud, invite students to respond personally to the storyand to discuss their own ideas about the setting, the characters, and the eventsby asking such questions as: Did you enjoy this historical fiction story? Why or why not? What did you visualize as you listened to it read aloud? Which characters did you feel you got to know best? In what ways? Which details helped you understand what life was like during this time?Make the Mentor TextComprehensible for ELsBeginningPoint to the illustration on page 8.Say: These men are carving stones.Point to the photograph on page 9.Say: This building is 4,000 years old.Intermediate and AdvancedDisplay illustrations from pages 8, 10,and 15 of the story. Say: What do youknow about these tools? If you carveda sculpture from stone, what would itlook like? Which rules, or laws, do youthink a king would want to write down?What do you think of the writing on thisstone? Encourage a background-buildingdiscussion about stone carving andsculpture, or rules and laws and ancientcuneiform writing.All LevelsIf you have students whose first languageis Spanish, share the following English/Spanish cognates to help them understandthe lesson focus: code/el código; temple/el templo.Use the images provided on the interactivewhiteboard resources to help ELs learnvocabulary and key concepts for the readaloud.If necessary, model the following sentence frames to supports ELs andstruggling students: I liked this story because . I visualized . I understand what life was like because .Connect and Transfer to Independent WritingSay: Remember that when you write a historical fiction story you’ll wantto create an authentic setting that fits the time and place where your storyoccurs. You’ll also want to describe characters who really lived or who couldhave lived then. The events in the story should dramatize things that didhappen or that could have happened during that time and in that place. 2012 Benchmark Education Company, LLCGrade 6 Historical Fiction5

INTRODUCE THE GENREMINI-LESSON 3Historical FictionReaders’op titles in this set.Early River Civilizations The Strong and the Weak:Hammurabi’s CodeTomb Robbers! A Story ofAncient EgyptThe Strongand the Weak:Hammurabi’s Codey AtlantisEl DoradoTomb Robbers! Campus AttackSabotage!Egypt Ra Creates the WorldIsis and OsirisThe Death and Rebirth of OsirisA Story of Ancient Egypt Next!Observing the AntsREAD ALOUD A MENTORHISTORICAL FICTION STORYIntroduce the Mentor Historical Fiction StorySay: Today I’m going to read you a historical fiction story, “Tomb Robbers! AStory of Ancient Egypt.” The author, Amanda Jenkins, has also written severalyoung adult novels, and she teaches writing at Vermont College of Fine Arts. Jake Digs a HoleLuke and the Bug Man Dream PilotErasednyby Amanda JenkinsMentor TextMini-Lesson ObjectivesIn this mini-lesson, students will: Listen to an interactive historicalfiction story read-aloud to learnthat historical fiction has dialoguethat is made up but soundsauthentic, can be told in the thirdperson or first person, and at leastone character who must deal witha conflict. Share personal responses to thehistorical fiction story.Mini-Lesson PreparationMaterials Needed Mentor text: “Tomb Robbers! AStory of Ancient Egypt” Chart paper and markers Interactive whiteboard resourcesAsk: What does the title of the story tell you about the subject, setting,historical time period or themes of the story? Do you have any idea who thecharacters might be? Allow students to share their predictions.You may wish to display the story using the interactive whiteboard resourcesso that students can follow along as you read.If your class includes English learners or other students who would benefitfrom vocabulary and oral language development to comprehend the narrative,use “Make the Mentor Text Comprehensible for ELs.”Read Aloud the Mentor Historical Fiction StoryRead aloud the text, stopping at some or all of the places indicated (or at otherpoints you choose) to highlight key features of this historical fiction story:1. The dialogue is made up, but it sounds realistic for the characters’ situationand setting.2. Historical fiction can be told in the first or third person.3. At least one main character deals with a conflict.Details About Point of ViewPage 19, after second paragraph. Say: I notice that the author refers toMery’s feet as her feet and Mery’s dress as her dress. That’s a clue that theauthor is telling the story in the third person. If the story were told from Mery’spoint of view, the author would have said “I was immediately on my feet” and“I pulled my dress over my head.” Historical fiction stories can be told fromeither point of view: first person or third person. But it’s clear that this story isbeing told in the third person.Dialogue that Sounds Realistic for the Situation and SettingPage 20. Say: I really understand the different points of view of Mery andKhaba, thanks to their dialogue. Mery expresses her worst fears and hersense of what’s right and wrong when she whispers, “If you’re caught, you’llbe executed.” Khaba’s resolute determination comes through in his reply:“I’m not going to get caught.” I can see that Mery is caring and Khaba is selfconfident from the way they speak to each other. The dialogue is made up,but it is like a conversation between real people.6 Grade 6 Historical Fiction 2012 Benchmark Education Company, LLC

Mini-Lesson ThreeAt Least One Main Character Deals with a ConflictPage 20, after sixth paragraph. Say: From the dialogue here, I learnabout the main problem in the story. Mery says, “Khaba, you can’t rob thepharaoh’s tomb.” And Khaba says, “Watch me.” Now I understand the conflictand the difference of opinion between the brother and sister. Historical fictionstories have a conflict that one or more of the characters need to solve. This iswhat makes the story interesting.At Least One Main Character Deals with a ConflictAfter reading page 20. Say: I learn a lot more about the conflict betweenMery and Khaba on this page. Mery gives two reasons why she thinks Khabacan’t rob the tomb. First she says that if he does that, the pharaoh “won’twatch after us from the afterlife.” This reason fits the beliefs people held aboutpharaohs in ancient Egypt. Khaba counters immediately with reasons whyhe doesn’t agree: “He’s not watching over us anyway.” Mery comes up witha second objection, saying Khaba will be executed if he’s caught. And again,Khaba refutes this by saying he won’t get caught. I like the way the authordevelops the conflict here, through dialogue that builds the dramatic tensionin the story.Respond Orally to the Mentor Historical Fiction StoryAfter reading the story aloud, invite students to respond personally to the storyand to discuss their own ideas about the story’s dialogue, point of view, andconflicts by asking such questions as: Did you like this story? Why or why not? What did you picture in your mind as you listened to the story? Does the conflict between Mery and Khaba make you remember anyconflict you have experienced in your life? Which places in the story help you visualize what life was like during thistime period?Make the Mentor TextComprehensible for ELsBeginningDisplay pictures from the mentor text tohelp beginning ELs understand the settingand historical time period of the story.Name each image you point to: pyramid;hieroglyphs; tomb. Also point to theillustrations of the brother and sister inthe story as you say their names (Mery,Khaba). You may wish to display a mapshowing Egypt.Intermediate and AdvancedInvite students to tell you what theyknow about ancient Egypt, including thepyramids and ancient Egyptian tombs.Encourage a background-buildingdiscussion. Use images from the interactivewhiteboard resources or the book tosupport students’ comprehension.All LevelsIf you have students whose first languageis Spanish, share the following English/Spanish cognates to help them understandthe lesson focus: pharaoh/el faraón;pyramid/la pirámide; tomb/la tumba.Use photos or the images provided in theinteractive whiteboard resources to helpELs learn vocabulary and key concepts forthe read-aloud.If necessary, model the following sentence frames to supports ELs andstruggling students: I liked this story because . I visualized . The conflict in the story reminded me of . This story helped me understand what life was life when .Connect and Transfer to Independent WritingSay: Today we learned that dialogue in a historical fiction story must soundauthentic to the characters and to their historical time and place. Historicalfiction is told either through first person or third person point of view.Historical fiction also develops a conflict that one or more of the charactersmust solve. Remember these features as you work independently to write yourown piece of historical fiction. 2012 Benchmark Education Company, LLCGrade 6 Historical Fiction7

INTRODUCE THE GENREMINI-LESSON 4Historical FictionReaders’op titles in this set.Early River Civilizations The Strong and the Weak:Hammurabi’s CodeTomb Robbers! A Story ofAncient EgyptThe Strongand the Weak:Hammurabi’s Codey AtlantisEl DoradoTomb Robbers! Campus AttackSabotage!Egypt Ra Creates the WorldIsis and OsirisThe Death and Rebirth of OsirisA Story of Ancient Egypt Next!Observing the Ants Jake Digs a HoleLuke and the Bug Man Dream PilotErasednyby Amanda JenkinsMentor TextMini-Lesson ObjectivesIn this mini-lesson, students will: Analyze features of historical fictionon a class anchor chart. Listen to an interactive historicalfiction story and find the features ofthe genre in the narrative.Mini-Lesson PreparationMaterials Needed Mentor text: “Tomb Robbers! AStory of Ancient Egypt” Features of Historical Fiction(BLM 1) Chart paper and markersANALYZE THE FEATURES OF AHISTORICAL FICTION STORYExplain Genre FeaturesSay: Every genre has certain features that readers can expect to find. Forexample, if you read a research paper, you expect to find a text in whichinformation is presented in a logical order and which has a list of sourcesat the end. When you write a research paper, your readers will expect youto give credit to your sources for the information you present. If you read amemoir, you expect a personal narrative in which the writer recounts his orher feelings about an important experience. As a reader of historical fiction,you can expect to find certain features in any historical fiction story. Todaywe’re going to identify and analyze features of the historical fiction genre.Build a Class Genre Features Anchor ChartSay: I want you to think about what you already know about historical fiction.Think of the stories we have read together and that you have read by yourself.Let’s build an anchor chart to summarize the features we would expect to findin any work of historical fiction.Display a blank chart like the one shown here on chart paper or using theinteractive whiteboard resources. Also distribute copies of the chart to studentson BLM 1. Work with students to record features of historical fiction stories inthe left column. If necessary, use the following prompts to guide students: What kind of setting does a historical fiction story have? What kinds of characters would you expect to find in a historical fictionstory? What kind of events would occur? What do you think must be true about the dialogue? Which points of view could you use to tell a historical fiction story? What kinds of conflicts would you expect to find? Interactive whiteboard resourcesPreparation TipThis lesson builds on Introduce theGenre Mini-Lessons 2 and 3, duringwhich students have listened tomentor historical fiction stories. Ifyour students have not had priorexperiences reading and discussinghistorical fiction, you may wish toteach one or both of those minilessons prior to this one.8 Grade 6 Historical FictionHistorical FictionFeaturesExamples from the TextAuthentic historical settingpage 18: “her brother’s sleeping mat,” “a water skin”page 19: “the lush oasis bare sand and rock. The pyramidlay ahead ”Characters who lived or couldhave lived in the settingpage 19: the names Mery and Khaba sound authenticallyEgyptianEvents that occurred or couldhave occurred at the time thestory is setpage 19: “He was in love with a girl named Neferet, whorefused because he was poor. Khaba had been frettingabout how he could get a cow or a bit of copper.”Dialogue that sounds realisticfor the setting and characterspage 23: “The robbers were digging when they gotcaught,” Khaba said. “You mean when the curse tookeffect,” Mery corrected. 2012 Benchmark Education Company, LLC

Mini-Lesson FourStory told through thirdperson or first person pointof viewpage 22: “She had forgotten how superstitious Khaba was.”“Next they made their way through ”At least one character whodeals with a conflict of self,with others, or with naturepage 20 “Khaba you can’t rob the pharaoh’s tomb.” “Watchme.” “If you’re caught you’ll be executed.”Features of Historical Fiction Anchor Chart (BLM 1)Read Aloud a Historical Fiction StoryBefore you read, point out the right-hand column on your chart and onstudents’ BLMs. Explain that you are going to read aloud (or reread) ahistorical fiction story and that, as students listen, they should look forexamples of the genre features in the story. Explain that, after reading, studentswill work together in small groups to complete the chart. They will write downexamples of each genre feature. Read aloud (or reread) “Tomb Robbers! AStory of Ancient Egypt.” You may wish to use interactive whiteboard resourcesto display the text so that students can follow along.Teacher TipMany of the writing mini-lessons includepartner and small-group activities.Throughout the unit, ensure that allstudents work with a variety of partnersand groups. This will expose studentsto many points of view and give themopportunities to make connections amongtheir classmates.Strategies to Support ELsPair beginning ELs with fluent Englishspeakers during the small-group activity.Keep in mind that they will not be able tocontribute many ideas orally. You will wantto work with them individually to reinforceconcepts while other students writeindependently.IntermediateAnalyze the Mentor TextDivide students into small groups to complete second column on BLM 1. If youare using interactive whiteboard resources, invite students to revisit parts ofthe text at the whiteboard as they look for the examples they need.If your class includes English learners or other students who need support, use“Strategies to Support ELs.”Share IdeasBring students together and invite volunteers to share the examples they foundin “Tomb Robbers! A Story of Ancient Egypt.” Record their findings on youranchor chart. Post this anchor chart for students to refer to throughout the unitas they think about the historical fiction features they need to include in theirstories.Connect and Transfer to Independent WritingPair ELs with fluent English speakersduring the small-group activity. Write thefollowing simple sentence frames on chartpaper and model how students can usethem to contribute ideas in the group. Forexample:Historical fiction has .Characters in historical fiction are .The setting in historical fiction is .AdvancedEnsure that ELs work with fluent Englishspeakers during the small-group activity.All LevelsIf you have students whose first languageis Spanish, share the following English/Spanish cognates to help them understandthe lesson focus: character/el carácter;conflict/el conflicto; dialogue/el diálogo.Say: As you independently write your ow

Grade Mini-Lesson Menu PaGe BLM introduce the Genre 1. Finding topics for historical fiction 2 2. Read aloud a mentor historical fiction story 4 3. Read aloud a mentor historical fiction story 6 4. Analyze the features of a historical fiction story 8 1 5. Recognize how writers sequence ev

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SXD525160 Grade 4 Fiction Focus Pack, 4 books 13.95 SXD525161 Grade 4 Nonfiction Focus Pack, 4 books 13.95 SXD525163 Grade 4 Fiction/Nonfiction Pack, 8 books 24.95 SXD525142 Grade 4 Hi-Lo Pack, 4 books 13.95 SXD525164 Grade 5 Fiction Focus Pack, 4 books 13.95 SXD525165 Grade

7 Grade 1 13 Grade 2 18 Grade 3 23 Grade 4 28 Grade 5 33 Grade 6 38 Elementary Spanish. 29 Secondary. 39 Grade 7 43 Grade 8 46 Grade 9 49 Grade 10 53 Grade 11 57 Grade 12 62 Electives. Contents. Textbook used with Online Textbook used with DVD. Teacher Edition & Student Books. Color Key

Age group: 5–18 Published: September 2014 Reference no: 140157 Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector (HMCI) raised concerns about low-level disruption in schools in his Annual Report 2012/13. As a consequence, guidance to inspectors was tightened to place greater emphasis on this issue in routine inspections. In addition, HMCI commissioned a survey to ascertain the nature and extent of low-level .