Healthy Eating & Physical Activity Learning Resource

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Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Learning ResourceGrade 9Healthy Eating &Physical ActivityLearning Resource

Grade 9 Cover LetterDear teachers:Welcome to the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Learning Resource.As a teacher, you are in a unique position to educate students about the benefits of healthy eating and physicalactivity. You can inspire them to make healthy choices today and assist them to build knowledge and skills thatdevelop into healthy habits benefiting them throughout their lives.Studies show that one out of every four B.C. children aged 2-17 is overweight or obese. The number ofoverweight teens has doubled in the past 25 years and cases of obesity have tripled. The good news is that we areall working together to make the healthier choice the easier choice where we live, learn, work and play.We are pleased to provide this learning resource as part of ActNow BC — government’s initiative to encouragepeople to make healthier lifestyle choices to be more physically active, eat healthier food, live tobacco-free andavoid alcohol use in pregnancy. This resource complements the Health and Career Education curriculum andPlanning 10, and was tested by real B.C. teachers in real B.C. classrooms. We hope that you, too, find it a powerfultool that helps you help your students to live and eat well.Thank you,Shirley BondMinister of Education and Deputy Premier(and Minister Responsible for Early Learningand Literacy)Gordon HoggMinister of State for ActNow BC

Grade 9 AcknowledgementsMany teachers, health professionals, administrators,consultants and students throughout British Columbia havemade this healthy eating and physical activity programpossible. It has been carefully researched, focus-tested,reviewed and pilot-tested in classrooms. It has beenguided by an Advisory Committee of Education and Healthstakeholders. In particular we wish to thank the followingfor their assistance in the development of Healthy Eatingand Physical Activity Learning Resource.Pilot School Districts, Schools and TeachersSchool District # 36 (Surrey)Anna BuggyNorth Surrey Secondary SchoolKathy BucciNorth Surrey Secondary SchoolBrita ColeroNorth Surrey Secondary SchoolAimee ParkinNorth Surrey Secondary SchoolSchool District # 45 (West Vancouver)Andrea JenksSentinel Secondary SchoolSchool District # 46 (Powell River)Cindy Sutherhland Elphinstone Secondary SchoolSchool District # 47 (Sunshine Coast)Rita JohnOceanview Middle SchoolSchool District # 63 (Saanich)Aaron BuckhamStelly’s Secondary SchoolLindsay Simmonds Stelly’s Secondary SchoolAdvisory CommitteeSheri AshdownTeacher, School District #34Meghan Day2010 Legacies NowLisa Forster-CoullMinistry of HealthSheryl GiudiciInterior Health AuthorityTanya GrandMinistry of EducationLorie HrycuikMinistry of HealthBryna Kopelaw2010 Legacies NowElizabeth McAuleyMinistry of EducationSydney MasseyBC Dairy FoundationDania Matiation Vancouver Coastal HealthAuthorityMaureen Rowlands Heart and Stroke Foundation ofBC & YukonKaren Strange2010 Legacies NowLeslie ThompsonMinistry of EducationJan UnwinSchool District # 42Lori ZehrMinistry of HealthDevelopment TeamKate Dahlstrom, Ed.D.Dorothy Fitch, B.A.Janelle Hatch, MHSc, RDRebecca Milne-Frechette, M.Kin.DesignAlphabet Communications Ltd.School District # 73 (Kamloops)Jennifer MallaisBarriere Secondary SchoolDah Rohl South Kamloops SecondarySchoolJeff Willett South Kamloops SecondarySchoolCorey Yamaoka South Kamloops SecondarySchoolSchool District # 75 (Mission)Linda MillerMission Secondary SchoolContains post-consumer recycled fibre.

Grade 9 Table of ContentsIntroduction5At a Glance7Lesson 1 - Day at the Improv8Lesson 2 - Snack Facts13Lesson 3 - Energy Balance20Lesson 4 - The Ultimate Healthy Canadian Teen30Further Resources and Contacts364

Grade 9 IntroductionHealthy Eating and Physical Activity Learning Resource, is aKindergarten to Grade 10 grade-by-grade set of healthyeating and physical activity classroom-based lesson plansfor the BC public school system. The Ministry of Health, inpartnership with the Ministry of Education, developed thelearning resources in consultation with students, teachersand health professionals. They are congruent with and meetminimum prescribed learning outcomes in Health and CareerEducation from Kindergarten to Grade 9 and Planning 10.The lesson plans have been developed with the latestevidence in healthy eating, physical activity and sociallearning theory. The spiral curriculum model has been usedto support students in all grades, to gain the knowledgeand skills to make healthier choices and develop a life-longhealthy lifestyle. The following teaching/learning strategieshave been incorporated: inquiry brainstorming role-playing discussion and debatesThese strategies encourage students to think critically,interact with their teacher and classmates and make healthdecisions in a fun and engaging manner.All lessons have been focus and pilot tested in BC schoolsthroughout the province. Teachers reported that thelessons are easy to deliver, student-focused and engaging.Although many resources exist to help educators teachhealthy eating and physical activity, few exist that areCanadian and provide a developmentally appropriateprogram from Kindergarten to Grade Ten based on EatingWell with Canada’s Food Guide and Canada’s Physical ActivityGuide to Healthy Active Living.The lessons form a unit of instruction, with the final lessondesigned to review and culminate the learning for thatgrade level. Everything necessary to teach the lesson plansfor each grade is provided in the resources, including anassessment component. Throughout, informational pages,called Teacher Backgrounders, are included that provideinformation in an easy-to-use format specific to individuallessons. Although it is preferable that each year be followedfrom Kindergarten to Grade 10, it is not mandatory.Every teacher in the BC education system can use theseresources.5Creating Healthy Schools inBritish ColumbiaSchools are ideal settings for enabling students to developlife-long healthy behaviours to achieve their individualpotential and contribute to a healthy society. In BritishColumbia, over half our youth are inactive and less than halfeat sufficient fruits and vegetables for optimum health.Under ActNow BC,government’s health and“The school setting is onewellness initiative supportingof the most promisingBritish Columbian’s leadsettings for helpinghealthier lives, the Ministrieschildren and youth developof Health and Educationhealthy ways of living.”have collaborated to support(Perry Kendall, An Ounce ofthe development of thisPrevention, A Public Health Rationaleintegrated and coordinatedfor the School as a Setting for HealthPromotion: A Report of the BCapproach to assist schoolProvincial Health Officer, 2004)districts and schools to createenvironments that supporthealthy eating and physicalactivity. The following initiatives help schools to help studentsput into practice skills and knowledge gained in the classroom: The Guidelines for Sales and Food and Beverages in BCSchools are intended to eliminate junk food in the schoolsetting. The guidelines apply to vending machines,school sales, cafeterias and fundraising and other eventsand are to be fully implemented by September 2008. The BC School Fruit and Vegetable Snack Program whichprovides free BC produce as well as information tostudents is being implemented province-wide with allschools expecting to receive the program by 2010. Action Schools! BC, a best practice model, providesschools with the framework and tools to providemore opportunities for more children to makehealthy choices in physical activity and healthyeating more often. Finally, BC Healthy Schools Network has beenestablished to address a variety of academic, socialand emotional concerns of students through acomprehensive school health approach. The HealthySchools Network will enhance the ability of theeducation and health sectors to work more effectivelyin this collaborative effort to promote health throughthe school setting.

Grade 9 IntroductioncontinuedPrivacy IssuesMany of the lessons invite students to share personalinformation, at their discretion. An atmosphere of respectfor the contributions of all class members is required. Ifwork is to be displayed, it is important that students’ effortsare not publicly identified.Role of Food in Families, Culturesand ReligionFood provides a variety of functions in society. It nourishes,nurtures and creates social connectedness. It can be animportant part of family and community celebrations, aswell as having great prominence in many cultures andreligions worldwide. Sensitivity on the value of food tostudents is important to acknowledge, as is recognizingindividuality and sharing in a classroom setting to supportinclusion and understanding. It is important to note thatsome families do have challenges in providing enoughnutritious foods in the home environment.NoteSome lessons require student access to EatingWell with Canada’s Food Guide and Canada’sPhysical Activity Guide to Healthy ActiveLiving. These publications can be accessedby contacting your local Health Authority,phoning 1 800 622-6232 or downloadingthem from www.healthcanada.gc.ca/fooduideand www.paguide.com.

Grade 9 At a GlanceLESSONPRESCRIBEDLEARNING OUTCOMEGENERAL OVERVIEWOBJECTIVESLESSON 1Relate characteristicsof a healthy lifestyle totheir ability to maximizepersonal potential.Students explore thecharacteristics of ahealthy lifestyle, identifywhich characteristics areapplicable to them anddecide how to improvetheir eating and physicalactivity habits.Students: identify the characteristics of ahealthy lifestyle.Students will investigatehow snacking onpackaged food cancontribute to or detractfrom a healthy lifestyle.Students analyse their snacking habits.Day at theImprovAnalyse how healthyeating habits can supporta healthy lifestyle.LESSON 2Snack FactsAnalyse how healthyeating habits can supporta healthy lifestyle. classify which characteristics areapplicable to healthy eating andphysical activity. relate these characteristics totheir own lifestyle. apply labeling information inorder to make healthy packagedsnack choices. choose healthy packagedsnacks.LESSON 3Energy BalanceLESSON 4The UltimateHealthyCanadian TeenRelate characteristicsof a healthy lifestyle totheir ability to maximizepersonal potential.Relate characteristicsof a healthy lifestyle totheir ability to maximizepersonal potential.Analyse how healthyeating habits can supporta healthy lifestyle.7Students will examinehow their eating andexercise choices and thetiming of these choicesimpact their energy levelsthroughout the day.Students analyse how scheduling eating,physical activity and sleepimpacts energy levels.Students will synthesizetheir knowledge ofhealthy eating andphysical activity andcomplete an applicationto participate in atelevision program calledThe Ultimate HealthyCanadian Teen.Students: identify the characteristics of ahealthy lifestyle. identify strategies to balanceenergy levels throughout theday to maximize their personalpotential. create an ideal of a healthyyoung person. identify and analyze their owndaily eating and physical activityhabits.

ChocolateGrade 9 Lesson 1 - Day at the ImprovGeneral OverviewIn this lesson students will explore the characteristics of a healthy lifestyle, identifywhich characteristics are applicable to them and decide how to improve theireating and physical activity habits.Curriculum ConnectionsHealth and Career Education Prescribed Learning Outcomes Relate characteristics of a healthy lifestyle to their ability to maximize personalpotential. Analyse how healthy eating habits can support a healthy lifestyle.ObjectivesStudents will be able to: identify the characteristics of a healthy lifestyle. classify which characteristics are applicable to healthy eating and physical activity. analyse how healthy eating habits support a healthy lifestyle. relate these characteristics to their own lifestyle.Preparation Copy Say-Choose-Do handout for each student. Copy the Reflection handout for each student. Copy the Characteristics of a Healthy Lifestyle Self-Assessment rubric foreach student.8

Engaging the LearnerWrite the stem, “A healthy lifestyle includes . . . “ on the board and have studentsbrainstorm endings to it. Record all their answers. Through discussion create adefinition of a healthy lifestyle.Activities Put students in pairs. Distribute the Say-Choose-Do handout to students. Use the first situation as an example and then have the class work together withthe teacher on the next examples. Have students complete the rest of the handout on their own. Discuss the handout and talk about the reasons why it’s a good idea to live ahealthy lifestyle beginning when they are young. Discuss how being healthy can affect their schoolwork, their families, their choiceof careers and their wellbeing. Put students into groups of three or four and have them create a short (twoto three minute) skit demonstrating a situation in which they are tempted byunhealthy food choices, but instead choose the healthiest alternatives. Havethem refer to their completed Say-Choose-Do handout for inspiration. Have students share their skits with the class. Discuss each skit by asking thefollowing questions:1. Who was tempted?2. What unhealthy food choice was made?3. What healthy alternative was chosen? Discuss assessment criteria with students. Have students complete the Reflection Handout. Tell them to use the definitionof a healthy lifestyle that they created earlier.AssessmentHave students use the Characteristics of a Healthy Lifestyle Self-Assessment rubric.9

Lesson 1 Say - Choose - DoDirections: Create some situations and think about what a healthy person might say,choose and do and what YOU usually say, choose and do.SITUATIONSchool CafeteriaCommunity CentreFast Food RestaurantSAYCHOOSEDOHealthy Person: “I’ll havea healthy lunch today.”Healthy Person: A sliceof ham & pineapple pizzawith whole wheat crust, asalad and a carton of milk.Healthy Person: Takemy time and eat with myfriends.ME: “I’ll have what myfriends have for lunch.”ME: A hamburger, Frenchfries and a pop.ME: Eat quickly so I canwatch the basketball game.Healthy Person: “I’mgoing to do some strengthtraining in the gym.”Healthy Person: I’ll join aclass in supervised weighttraining.Healthy Person: Go toclass every week.ME:ME:ME:Healthy Person:Healthy Person:Healthy Person:ME:ME:ME:Healthy Person:Healthy Person:Healthy Person:ME:ME:ME:Healthy Eating and Physical Ac tivity : HANDOUT10

Lesson 1 ReflectionName:Directions: Reflect on your own eating and activity habits. Complete the followingaccording to how it relates to your current health.A healthy lifestyle includes:How would you rate your current lifestyle?Why?My number one healthy behavior is:I will try to improve my health by:Attaining and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will affect my futurein the following ways:11Healthy Eating and Physical Ac tivity : HANDOUT

Lesson 1 C haracteristics of a Healthy LifestyleSelf-Assessment RubricName:I identified the characteristics of a healthy lifestyle.8642I related the characteristics of a healthy lifestyle to myself.8642I can distinguish between healthy and less than healthy behaviors.8642I identified areas for health improvement in order to maximize my personal potential.8642I analysed how healthy eating supports a healthy lifestyle.8642Score: /40KEY8 Excellent6 Good4 Satisfactory2 needs improvementLesson 1 C haracteristics of a Healthy LifestyleSelf-Assessment RubricName:I identified the characteristics of a healthy lifestyle.8642I related the characteristics of a healthy lifestyle to myself.8642I can distinguish between healthy and less than healthy behaviors.8642I identified areas for health improvement in order to maximize my personal potential.8642I analysed how healthy eating supports a healthy lifestyle.8642KEYScore: /408 Excellent6 Good4 Satisfactory2 needs improvementHealthy Eating and Physical Ac tivity : HANDOUT12

Grade 9 Lesson 2 - Snack FactsGeneral OverviewIn this lesson students will investigate how snacking on packaged food can contributeto or detracts from a healthy lifestyle.Curriculum ConnectionsHealth and Career Education Prescribed Learning Outcomes Analyse how healthy eating habits can support a healthy lifestyle.The Day Before.On the day prior to this lesson, askstudents to bring their favouritepackaged snack to school. Bringa supply of packaged snacks forstudents who are not able tobring a sample. (E.G. potato chips,chocolate bars, packaged cookies,granola bars, packaged crackerswith cheese or other spreads,popcorn, soft drinks, etc.ObjectivesStudents will be able to: analyse their snacking habits. apply labeling information in order to make healthy packaged snack choices. choose healthy packaged snacks.Preparation Read Healthy Snacking Teacher Backgrounder. Copy Snack Facts handout for each student. Copy Snack Facts Self-Assessment rubric for each group. Post Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide for student viewing.13NoteYou may want to bring sugar, lard,and teaspoons to class to providestudents with a visual of theamount of sugar and fat containedin common packaged snacks.

Grade 9 Lesson 2 - InfluencesEngaging the Learner Provide students who do not have a snack with a sample of a packaged snack. Ask students why they have chosen their particular snack and where they got it. Allow students time to compare and discuss their chosen snacksActivities Ask students to find the Nutrition Facts table on their snack package. Ask them to look at the amount of food in the package and the portion size on theNutrition Facts.a. Are they the same or different?NoteAt this point you may wantto provide students with ademonstration of the amountof sugar and fat contained incommon packaged snacks bymeasuring out the number ofteaspoons of sugar and fat forindividual snacks.b. Does this affect them in terms of how much of their snack they will eat?c. Do they typically use the label to make snack or other food choices? Have students form groups of five. Ensure that each member of the group has adifferent snack. Distribute the Snack Facts handout to each student and tell students to use theNutrition Facts table on their snack to complete the handout. All the snacks ineach group need to be recorded on the handout. Once students have completed their handout ask them to share their findings. See side note. You might use the Healthy Snacking Teacher Backgrounder to cue them byasking questions such as:a. Which snacks would you consider the healthiest? Why?b. Where did you get these snacks?c. Where do you go to get a healthy snack?d. D o you ever choose snacks based on nutrition label information?Why or why not?e. How often and when might you have a snack?f. What tips would you give a friend about choosing a healthy snack? Ask students what they consider to be healthy snacks. List their suggestions onthe board.Assessment: Have each group of students complete the Snack Facts Self-Assessment rubric.Suggest that the students bring a healthy packaged snack to school tomorrow.14

Lesson 2 Teacher BackgrounderHealthy SnackingSnacks can be an important part of healthy eating. Teens are growing and developingand need more energy and nutrients than do adults. Healthy snacks can provideteens with energy and nutrients beyond what they get from meals.What is a healthy snack?A healthy snack is one that is high in nutrients and low in fat and sugar. Try thinkingof snacks as mini meals; plan them to include foods from at least two of the four foodgroups from Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide. When people are hungry betweenmeals they are often tempted to choose foods that initially provide a quick energyboost, but foods, such as potato chips or chocolate bars, are often high in fat andsugar and low in important nutrients.Snacking- when and how much?The amount of food for each snack and the number of snacks needed each day varieswith each person as well as day to day. One day you may be hungry for two or threesnacks but the next day you may not want any. Follow your appetite; eat when youare hungry; stop when you are full. Use this concept each day to guide how often youeat during the day.The main thing to remember is that snacking is meant to tide you over to the nextmeal. Keep portion sizes in mind when snacking. Research shows that the sizeof snacks is increasing and this is where the issue of additional calories may beoccurring. You can use Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide serving sizes to helpplan reasonably sized snacks by including one food guide serving from two of thefood groups. For example, one piece of fruit, such as a small banana, plus a singleserving of yogurt (3/4 cup) or half a whole-wheat bagel with two tablespoons ofpeanut butter make nutritious snacks. Keep in mind that when you eat small amountstoo frequently throughout the day or eat a snack that is the size of a meal it may causeyou to overeat.(Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide: www.healthcanada.gc.ca/foodguide)Tips for healthy snacking Plan healthy snacks with foods from the four food groups. Take snacks with you when you are on the go. Keep snack sizes reasonable. Limit snacking to three times a day. Try to choose healthy snack foods most of the time.15

Lesson 2 Teacher BackgrounderHealthy SnackingExamples of healthy snacksSome of the healthiest snack food choices are ones that are quick and easy. CheckEating Well with Canada’s Food Guide for food guide serving size.From Homecheese and crackerstortilla chips with salsacottage cheese with fruitone slice bread with peanut butterFrom the Vending Machinesmall granola barsmall package of pretzelssmall cereal barsmall package of nutsFrom the Cafeteriahalf a sandwichcup of yogurta piece of fruithalf a bagel with jam or peanut buttercup of veggies with dipFrom the Convenience Storesmall package of Trail mixsmall package of roasted nuts2 – 3 rice cakessmall bag of popcorn with seasoning2 – 3 plain cookies16

Take 5 to read the factsGot 5 minutes? Follow these 5 easy steps to read the Nutrition Facts table.1 Serving sizeIf you eat the serving size shown on the Nutrition Facts table,you will get the amount of calories and nutrients that are listed.Always compare the serving size on the package to the amount thatyou eat.1Nutrition FactsPer 1 cup (55 g)% Daily Value3Fat 2 g3%4Saturated 0 g Trans 0 gCholesterol 0 mgSodium 270 mg0%Amount22 CaloriesCalories tell you how much energy you get from one serving of apackaged food.3 Percent Daily Value (% Daily Value)% Daily Value puts nutrients on a scale from 0% to 100%. This scaletells you if there is a little or a lot of a nutrient in one serving of apackaged food.4 Get less of these nutrients:Calories 220Carbohydrate 44 g11 %15 %532 %Fibre 8 gSugars 16 gProtein 6 gVitamin A0 % Vitamin C0%Calcium4 % Iron40 % Fat, saturated fat and trans fat CholesterolHealthy Eating is in Store for YouHealthy Eating is in Store for You SodiumFaites provisionde saineFaites provision de saine alimentationChoose packagedfoodsalimentationwith a low % Daily Value of fat and sodium,especially if you are at risk for heart disease or diabetes.TMTMMCMC5 Get more of these nutrients:Large Format Carbohydrate Fibre Vitamin A and Vitamin C Calcium IronChoose packaged foods with a high % DailyValue of these nutrients. If you have diabetes,watch how much carbohydrate you eat as thiswill affect your blood glucose levels.Healthy Eating is in Store for YouFaites provision de saine alimentationLarge FormatTMMDHealthy Eating is in Store for YouFaites provision de saine alimentationFact Sheet # 3TMMCwww.healthyeatingisinstore.caADVISORY COMMITTEE: Canadian Council of Food & Nutrition Canadian Council of Grocery Distributors Canadian Home Economics Association Canadian Public Health Association Consumers’ Association of Canada Food and Consumer Products of Canada Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada - Health Check Program Kraft Canada Inc. Shop Smart Tours Inc.17 2005 Canadian Diabetes Association and Dietitians of Canada. Reprint permission not required.

Lesson 2 S nack Facts WorksheetDirections: IN YOUR GROUP record the names of each person’s snack.Find out how much sugar and fat are in your favourite snack food. Be sure to convert your findings into teaspoons.Decide if you should choose each snack most, sometimes or least.Are your snacks healthy? A healthy snack is high in nutrients such as calcium and iron and low in sugar and fats. If the packaged snack contains 5 g of fat or less and sugar is not the 1st or 2nd ingredient, this is considered ahealthy snack - choose most If the packaged snack contains 5g to 10 g of fat and sugar is not the 1st ingredient, this is still considered ahealthier snack - choose sometimes If the packaged snack contains more than 10 g of fat and sugar is the 1st ingredient, this is not considered tobe a healthy snack - limit and/or avoid4 grams of sugar 1 teaspoon5 grams of fat 1 teaspoonSnackSugar perserving in gramsSugar per servingin teaspoonsFat per servingin gramsFat per serving inteaspoonsChoose mostChoosesometimesLimit or avoidIdentify healthy snack alternatives from the four food groups (see Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide).Healthy Eating and Physical Ac tivity : HANDOUT18

Lesson 2 Snack Facts Group Assessment RubricSelf-Assessment RubricNames:We applied information from the nutrition facts table to ourselves in order tomake better choices.8642We analysed our own snacking habits.8642We distinguished between snacks we should choose most, sometimes and least.8642We identified a minimum of five benefits related to healthy snacking.8642Score: /32KEY8 Excellent Work6 Good Work4 Satisfactory Work2 Less than Satisfactory WorkLesson 2 Snack Facts Group Assessment RubricSelf-Assessment RubricNames:We applied information from the nutrition facts table to ourselves in order tomake better choices.8642We analysed our own snacking habits.8642We distinguished between snacks we should choose most, sometimes and least.8642We identified a minimum of five benefits related to healthy snacking.8642KEY8 Excellent Work6 Good Work4 Satisfactory Work2 Less than Satisfactory Work19Healthy Eating and Physical Ac tivity : HANDOUTScore: /32

Grade 9 Lesson 3 - Energy BalancePlanning NotesThe teaching of this lesson andcompletion of exercises willtake at least two school days,as students are required tomonitor their food intake andenergy levels for a continuous24 hours.General OverviewStudents will examine how their eating and activity choices and the timing of thesechoices impact their energy levels throughout the day.Curriculum ConnectionsHealth and Career Education Prescribed Learning Outcomes Relate characteristics of a healthy lifestyle to their ability to maximize personalpotential.ObjectivesStudents will be able to: analyse how scheduling eating, physical activity and sleep impacts energy levels. identify strategies to balance energy levels throughout the day to maximize theirpersonal potential.Preparation Find chart paper and coloured markers. Find and read the Teacher Backgrounder on Balancing Choices for Energy thatincludes frequently asked questions. Find Worst Case Scenario 24 Hour Energy Sample Timeline handout. Make Worst Case Scenario 24 Hour Energy Continuum transparency. Find Worst Case Scenario 24 Hour Energy Continuum answer key for teacher. Copy the Student 24 Hour Energy Timeline handout for each student. Copy the Student 24 Hour Energy Continuum handout for each student. Copy the Energy Balance Self Assessment rubric for each student.20

Grade 9 Lesson 3 - Goal SettingEngaging the Learner Label three pieces of chart paper – low energy, moderate energy, high energyand post in three corners of the classroom. Tell students to go to the corner that best describes their current energy level. Once all students have congregated in the appropriate area, ask them to comeup with possible reasons why they think they have low, medium, or high levelsof energy and record them on the chart paper. They should consider food intake,physical activity, and sleep. Ask each group to share their responses. Discuss student responses identifying any commonalities within a group. (E.G.students with high energy may have all had 8-10 hours sleep the night before orstudents with low energy didn’t have breakfast.)Activities Discuss timelines as a tool to record food consumption and physical activities toassess energy levels. Review and discuss the Worst Case Scenario 24 Hour Energy Sample Timelinehandout with students. As a class, plot the information from the sample handout on the Worst CaseScenario 24 Hour Energy Continuum transparency. With students, identify the problems associated with both the timeline andcontinuum. (E.G. poor food choices, high peaks and valleys, etc.) Lead a discussion about the importance of healthy food choices, appropriatescheduling of food intake and physical activity and good sleeping habits andhow these help to balance energy levels throughout a 24-hour period. Distribute and have each student complete the Student 24 Hour Energy Timelinehandout based on yesterday. Distribute and have each student complete the Student 24 Hour EnergyContinuum handout. Students will need to refer to their completed Student 24Hour Energy Timeline handout and pay particular attention to the “How Did IFeel” column. Discuss the three questions listed on the Student 24 Hour Energy Continuumhandout. Distribute and have students complete the Energy Balance Self Assessment rubric.Assessment Use the Energy Balance Self Assessment rubric21

Lesson 3 Worst Case Scen

Analyse how healthy eating habits can support a healthy lifestyle. Students will synthesize their knowledge of healthy eating and physical activity and complete an application to participate in a television program called The Ultimate Healthy Canadian Teen. Students: identify the

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