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There Is A Lot At Stake

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Contents3916263438CHAPTER 1: Solidifying The FutureCHAPTER 2: Before You StartCHAPTER 3: Breaking The RulesCHAPTER 4: Hiring InterviewCHAPTER 5: Orientation Not EnoughCHAPTER 6: 180 Day Onboarding TimelinePAGE 2 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

Chapter 1Hiring: SolidifyingThe FutureOf all the strategic tasks within an organization,there is probably none more important thanrecruiting and hiring employees. If you’reon a recruiting or selection committee, or ifyou’re the hiring manager for your department,you’re entrusted with nothing less than the futureof your organization. Every organization needsto renew itself from time to time to meet thechallenges of a changing business environment.You do that through people. Every organizationhas some turnover. Even with less than 10%annual turnover, any organization runs the riskof becoming ossified. So, to stay ahead of theturnover curve, constant hiring and recruitingis essential.There is a lot at stakeGood hires are the lifeline of an organization.They solidify the future. Bad hires, on the otherhand, can cause untold damages.PAGE 3 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringHIRING MISTAKES CANBE VERY COSTLYIt is quite common for businesses to underestimate the truecost of a hiring mistake, which can end up being several timesthe employee’s annual salary.The problem with putting a dollar figure on a hiring mistakeis that the effects often reach far beyond the position itself,and may linger for a long time afterward.Here are some of the direct costs of hiring mistakes: cost of recruiting ads commissionsor fees paid to headhunters, professional recruiters orplacement firms transportationor relocation costs paid to the recruit to come to the interview or come to work trainingcosts for having sent the employee to job-specific trainingseminars severance costs when the employee is let goThese are all costs the accounting department should easily be ableto generate as being directly attributable to the hiring process.But they do not tell the whole story.PAGE 4 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringINDIRECT COSTS MAY BE EVENMORE STAGGERINGPerhaps even more important are indirect costs that are muchharder to quantify, such as: Staff time, which is part of payroll costs. How many managersand colleagues were involved in the recruiting process from thebeginning, drafting or approving the ads, reviewing resumes,interviewing candidates (either by telephone or in person),checking references, negotiating contracts concerning workingconditions, salary and benefits? The staff time involved surelywent well beyond the people in the HR Department, and wheneverything is all added up in man - or woman-hours, the figure islikely to be fairly hefty.costs, which are hard to calculate but very real Productivity nonetheless. In business, a team of people is typically onlyas strong as the weakest link on the team. Even just one bad hireis likely to drag down the productivity of the whole team. Lost opportunity costs, which are much harder to calculate,but can be vastly more significant. What lucrative sales contractsdid the company lose because the employee who didn’t workout screwed up an order? If the new employee was supposedto get a marketing campaign for a new product line off theground, how much revenue had been budgeted from that newline that did not materialize, in whole or in part? How much timedid the wrong hire set you back? How long will it take you torecover? Honest answers to these questions can reach some bignumbers for most enterprises. Even smaller companies can begreatly impacted.PAGE 5 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiringand resulting turnover costs. People like to work Morale with other smart people who energize them and spur themon to greater heights. One member of a team who’s not pullinghis or her weight can demoralize a whole team and sour thegood people forced to put up with the hiring mistake on thewhole company (“who hired this yo-yo in the first place?”).The resulting dent in morale on the good people you wantedto keep can easily result in unwanted turnover, with all itsassociated costs. itigation costs, which are extremely difficult to predict,Lbut can reach deeply into a company’s coffers. Of courseyou know you’re terminating the employee for cause becausethey just couldn’t do the job. But what if they decide to concoctsome illegal reason why you fired them, claiming it was becauseof race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, age or some otherprotected area. The legal fees needed just to get these kindsof cases tossed out of court can be prohibitive, which is why somany companies will simply settled a case. And if the employee’sattorney is skillful enough to actually get the case beforea sympathetic jury, you could be staring down a seven-digitverdict — on top of whatever your own company lawyeris costing you.IMPROVE YOUR ORGANIZATIONBY IMPROVING THEHIRING PROCESSThere are both offensive and defensive considerations when itcomes to hiring.On the defensive side, you obviously want to avoid mistakes andlawsuits, which can cost employers dearly.PAGE 6 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringBut if you just guard against making mistakes, you’ve merelyeliminated losses and at best maintained the status quo.In business there is no status quo.If you’re not advancing, you’re regressing. Your competitors are notstanding still. If you’re not outpacing them in growth, you’re losingthe battle — maybe gradually at first, but surely in the end.One of the most important things to look for in the hiring processis opportunities to improve the staff and improve the company’scapabilities in general to take advantage of new situations that maypresent themselves.You rarely want to simply replace what you may have lost. You wantto see if you can do better with every opening. At least the promiseof something better needs to be present at all times.You want to get people whose careers are still on the way up —before they make a ton of money and help some other organizationgrow. You don’t want to get them when their careers are alreadyon the wane and when they’re probably at their maximum earningpotential.But there is another phenomenon you have to guard against in thehiring process if you’re serious about looking upon every new hireas an opportunity to improve the business.Hiring managers need to be on guard against the insecuritycomplex.Consciously or subconsciously, many hiring managers are reluctantto get anyone on board who might at some point present a threatto them. They might not want anyone on their staffs smarterthan themselves.PAGE 7 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringSuch an insecurity complex can derail a company’s entire hiringand recruiting process.Carried to its logical extension, in such cases people who are8s on a 1-to-10 scale will only hire 6s or 7s — never 8s, 9s or 10s;they would be too much of a threat to them.In turn, those 6s and 7s will hire 5s and 4s — until the wholeorganization sinks into a sea of mediocrity.Senior management should from time to time examine therecruiting patterns of hiring managers.Are they willing to hire people smarter than themselves? Will theyalways go for the best hire, regardless of what it may meanto themselves?PAGE 8 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

Chapter 2First Things First:Before YouStart RecruitingIt was legendary football coach VinceLombardi who said: “If you fail to prepare,you prepare to fail.”That’s true in recruiting, as well as in football.To get the maximum out of the recruiting process,there are a number of things the hiring managershould do before ever posting on a recruitingwebsite, or running an ad in a newspaper.The first question to ask is whether the open spotis merely a replacement for a person who left, orwhether it is a new position.In the case of a new position needed forexpansion, you may look more at the personthan at the specific job skills you need. You wanta go-getter. If it’s a new line of business you’relaunching, no one may yet have the experience,so you’re looking for someone who has a provenability to get new ventures off the ground.You may be looking for a set of character andpersonality traits rather than specific skills.PAGE 9 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringThere are a handful of well-establishedcompanies that can help devise tests that tell yousomething about character traits.HIRING REPLACEMENTS:A 10-STEP PROCESSIn most cases, companies are looking to replace someone whohas either left the company or has been (or is being) promoted ortransferred to a different job, and the position needs to be filled.There is an order and a procedure for how to go about recruitingthe best possible candidate for the job.Here is how to do that in 10 steps:1) WHO SHOULD BEINVOLVED IN THE SELECTION?The usual suspects include someone from the HR Departmentto sort resumes as they come in and recommend only the mostpromising candidates to the hiring manager, the manager towhom the new employee will be reporting and at least one othersenior employee.If either manager interviews the candidate one-on-one, there arealways signals that he or she misses. It’s best to have anotheremployee present to pick up on such signals.If the manager is male and the candidate is female, it might makesense to have a senior female employee sit in on the interviewto put the candidate more at ease and have someone else therePAGE 10 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiringwho can answer questions about company culture, etc., from thecandidate’s point of view.For a similar reason, you might want to have a trusted youngeremployee present to help bridge a generational gap.Be careful about including more than two people in an interview—a battery of people firing off questions can get intimidating.2) OUTLINE THE POSITIONWhat is the job description and does it need to be updated?Has the job changed since the days that the last employee did it?Was the last occupant of the job right for the position or was therea mismatch that could have been prevented by writing a sharperjob description?In answer to job postings or ads, you always get a bunch ofresumes from “professional applicants,” people who seem toapply to any and all job postings, regardless of the requirements.So in your posting, try to give enough specifics to attract thepeople you really want to attract.3) WHAT ARE THE NEEDED SKILLS?Some unique skills that are specific to the job may have to betaught after the candidate is hired.That’s almost inevitable.But you probably don’t want to have to teach EVERYTHING.PAGE 11 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringYou want to make sure the candidate has some basic skills.What are they, and how can you make sure the candidate in factpossesses those skills? Is a diploma of some sort proof enough?Can you devise a simple on-site test that will immediately give youa satisfactory answer?4) WHAT IS THE EXPERIENCELEVEL YOU NEED?Do you need people with a minimum number of years in the job?Has practice shown that one or two years is enough or do yourequire more?The more experience you ask for, the more expensive thecandidate is likely to become.5) WHAT IS YOUR BUDGET FORTHE POSITION?Your company may have a budget for the recruiting process itself,meaning how much you can spend on ads or job postings, howmuch staff time and resources you can occupy, and how long theprocess should take, all of which may determine how long youhave to spend on filling the position.And there will definitely be a budget for what kind ofcompensation has beenset aside for the open position.In many cases there will be a range. Of course you will try to getthe person with the most relevant experience at the right price.But it does no good to select an excellent candidate who demandsan annual salary of 85,000, only to be told later that you can’tpay more than 45,000.PAGE 12 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring6) IS AN INTERNALCANDIDATE AVAILABLE?Some companies post all job openings internally as a matter ofprocedure.Whether your company has such a procedure or not, it’s alwaysa good idea to mentally check within the ranks of employees inother departments, or check with their managers, to see if anyoneelse inside the company could fill the spot.You will save a lot of time onboarding people. Those already onthe inside know the culture. And they may be fairly easy to replacein the department they’re in.7) DOES SHE HAVE A SISTER?Before you take the recruiting process outside, you might ask yourpresent employees if they know of anyone in their family or circleof acquaintances who might want to and could do the job.If they recommend a relative or a friend, their own reputation is atstake — and if the person really joins, they’ll also have a stake inmaking it a success, so it might be a win-win all around.Of course this kind of insidecandidate would still have topass all your tests to make surehe or she can really do the job.PAGE 13 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring8) ARE THERE ANYDIVERSITY ISSUES?This is probably more of a question from the HR Department, butin today’s litigious society, the whole hiring process is fraught withlegal perils. Is your department or company — or could it be in thefuture — under scrutiny for not having enough diversity?In some cases, a special effort may be required to fill the nextavailable position with an eye toward diversifying.9) HOW WILL YOUUSE SOCIAL MEDIA?You can learn a lot about people from social media these days.It can be both a boon and a curse for the recruiting process, foryou may learn some things you wish you never knew.Are those Facebook photos of long-ago college parties reallyrelevant to current character issues and the candidate’s abilityto do the job?And suppose you found out the candidate supports a particularpolitical cause of which you or your ownership is not terribly fond?How will that impact your hiring decisions?It’s best to have a policy in advance covering the handling ofinformation gathered from social media. Some large companiesdon’t check social media sites directly, but have a recruitingor staffing firm do it for them to keep their distance from theprocess.In any case, these decisions should not be made ona case-by-case basis, but should be handled consistentlyas a matter of policy.PAGE 14 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring10) WHO WILL THE NEWHIRE REPORT TO?The person who will be the new hire’s immediate supervisorneeds to be part of the recruiting process. You also want to makesure the recruit and his or her manager can live in the sameuniverse together and that they won’t drive each other crazy.The chemistry is important here. As the saying goes: If you wantthem to prepare a meal together, they first have to be able toagree on the ingredients.PAGE 15 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

Chapter 39 Companies ThatBroke The Rules toGet Great RecruitsTraditional hiring methods do work. That’s whythey have stood the test of time. If you run a printad, or post on Monster or CareerBuilder, or go tojob fairs, you’ll find candidates. And sometimesyou may get buried under stacks of resumes, notall of them worthwhile.For those who want to break out of the moldand try unique recruiting tactics, what followsare examples of nine companies that usedunconventional methods to land great recruits.One of them may work for you.PAGE 16 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring1) PROOF THAT SOMETIMESFLATTERY WORKSContacting someone who is currently working for a directcompetitor, telling the person you have followed their career forsome time and really admire the way they do their job is a greatway to get someone’s attention.It's Very FlatteringIt’s not just a recruiter calling who getsa commission for every person “sold” or “delivered” much like abounty hunter.This is a professional working in the same industry who’scalling and that professional presumably knows what he orshe is talking about.Such praise means infinitely more.Vero Beach 32963, a newspaper in Vero Beach, FL,needed a columnist.The publisher called up the sports columnist for the rival dailyand offered him a general column on community topics, saying hewas convinced the columnist could write about anything, not justsports. The columnist joined and considerably boosted the stockof his new employer.The columnist joined and considerably boosted the stock of hisnew employer. Proof that flattery will get you somewhere!PAGE 17 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring2) MANAGING A VIRTUAL KITCHENTURNED UP GREAT RECRUITSIn attempt to recruit more Millennials, as well as attract applicantsfor international branches, Marriott International launched the“My Marriott Hotel” game.Players manage a virtual hotel restaurant kitchen, purchasesupplies on a budget and manage employees.The game helped Marriott generate interest in the hospitalityindustry, increase brand awareness and identify talentacross the globe.According to Francesca Martinez, Marriott VP of HumanResources, players from 120 different countries are running theirown virtual kitchens at any given time.The game also successfully increased traffic to the company’scareer site.Martinez approximates that one-third of users click on the “try itfor real” button on the top corner of the game, which redirectsthem to the company’s career site.PAGE 18 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring3) RECRUITED THE NEIGHBORSTO BOOST RETENTIONA long commute is a morale downer for any job. People who livenear the office tend to stay longer, reducing turnover costs.Retention starts with recruiting, so at one point Facebook offeredan additional 600 monthly subsidy for employees who livedwithin a mile of the company’s Palo Alto, CA, campus.What better way to keep employees more productive than byhaving them live close by?PAGE 19 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring4) LOOK FOR TALENT WHENDINING OUT, SHOPPINGIf you are recruiting more on personality traits and lesson actual job skills, you may be able to look for great peoplein unexpected places.Quicken Loans did just that to find people who fit its corporateculture, the company’s Director of Talent Acquisition told the NewYork Times.The company once sent employees out to observe restaurant andretail employees, and to offer interviews to those who really stoodout for their customer service skills.“Too many companies focus on industry experience when theyrecruit. We can teach people about finance. We can’t teachpassion, urgency and a willingness to go the extra mile,” thedirector said.PAGE 20 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring5) USE SELF-SELECTION TO FINDOUT WHO'S REALLY INTERESTEDSome companies have added another step between resumesubmission and a personal interview to find out who’s reallyinterested.A consulting startup, I Love Rewards Inc, which has now evolvedinto Achievers, described in an interview with the Wall StreetJournal how the company invited 1,200 applicants for entry-levelpositions to an open house, but only 400 actually came.The added effort of attending the open house reduced thenumbers in the screening process, and also enabled the companyto see how people interacted in groups.PAGE 21 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring6) POKER NIGHT:A WAY TO SPOTKEY TRAITSWhen Susan Hailey was VP of Talent Acquisition at CaesarsEntertainment, she launched the MBA Poker Championshipsin Las Vegas, inviting MBA candidates from top-notch businessschools like UCLA and Duke University.Both full-time and part-time MBA students, as well as alumni areinvited to participate. Participants must have some familiarity withpoker, and real cash prizes are given, with a portion donated tothe Alzheimer’s Association.Besides the element of fun, recruiters look for risk-taking andanalytical skills. Landing your dream job is always a question of alittle bit of luck, being in the right place at the right time, so thisstrategy adds a new dimension to getting lucky.PAGE 22 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring7) SPEED DATING:THE 3-MINUTEINTERVIEWAt Travelodge’s UK operation, a recruiting VP was struck by thefact that most hiring managers admitted to having made up theirminds in the first few minutes of an interview whether they likedthe candidate or not, and whether they were going to offer thecandidate the job.The company took that to its logical extension, so that when it hadto hire 30 staffers quickly, it conducted three-minute interviews,jokingly referred to as a “Flirtatious Encounter,” according to acompany press release.Travelodge Resourcing Manager Ruth Saunders said hiringmanagers would decide whether or not they liked the candidatein “the first minute and a half of meeting them” anyway, so theymight as well dispense with the rest of the time.PAGE 23 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring8) WRAP AN RV WITH AN ADAmy Rees Anderson, a founder and managing partner of REESCapital, told Forbes magazine the tale of how she went afteremployees from a specific competitor.She said she wanted to target new hires that already had a job,preferably with certain companies she admired in her area mostlikely to have a similar culture.To reach these people, she wrapped an RV in a banner with thewords “Now Hiring” in big letters around it to create a mobilehiring center.The RV then drove to public parking lots used by employees ofthese targeted companies at lunchtime and staffers handed outhiring flyers from the RV to people walking by.PAGE 24 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring9) ADVERTISE WHERE YOUR IDEALCANDIDATES ARE LOOKINGAdvertising a job only where your ideal applicant hangs out maybe preferable to general job sites.Software developer Towerdata, formerly Rapleaf, was alwayslooking for people interested in Hadoop, an open-source softwareframework that supports applications running across multipledistributed computers.So the company purchased ads to appear whenever peoplesearched for keywords associated with Hadoop.PAGE 25 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

Chapter 4DOS AND DON'TS OFTHE HIRING INTERVIEWThe interview is where the rubber meets theroad to find outstanding candidates who havethe potential to improve your organization — andto weed out the pretenders who may talk a goodgame but can’t or won’t deliver.Many hiring managers decide within the firstfew minutes of the interview whether they like acandidate or not, and then spend the rest of thetime proving to themselves that the candidateis right for the job (if they liked him or her) ortalking themselves out of hiring the person (ifthey didn’t like the person at first).That's a dangerous practice.Some candidates have become very good atinterviewing simply because they’ve done it a lot— meaning they either lose a lot of jobs or theyget rejected a lot.PAGE 26 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringAnd there’s probably a reason for that.People who appear too glib and too likeablemay make a good first impression, but skillfulinterviewers should be able to unmask thepretenders with follow-up questions.It’s essential to use the best techniques toidentify the good candidates and avoid the losers.Here are 10 goals to keep in mind during theinterview to ensure the best possible outcomes:1) EXPLAIN THE HIRING PROCESSTo get the candidates to be more at ease and lessen the tension,explain early on during the interview what your company’sinterview processis.Explain: whether it is a first or final interview who else the candidate will meet what role those people will play in the decision-making process what tests will be given or required ow long the candidate can be expected to be onhthe premises, etc.It helps relax the candidates to know exactly what they’re in for.PAGE 27 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring2) FIND REASONS TO SAY'YES,' NOT 'NO'Keep an open, positive mind to the candidate’s potential fit.If you want to find a reason NOT to hire someone, you will alwaysbe able to do so.Instead of trying to find reasons why the candidate won’t work, tryto find reasons why it COULD work.3) ALWAYS BE SELLINGYou’re always selling during the interview. You’re playing up theadvantages of working for your organization.Don’t give the candidate the chance to reject you.If there’s any rejecting to be done, let you be the one to reject thecandidate.4) GET CANDIDATES TORELAX AND REVEALDon’t make a job interview feel like an interrogation.It should be more like a friendly conversation to get to know apossible future family member.Don’t cross your arms. Present an open stance, be relaxed, smile alot, and get candidates to talk about something else besides theirresumes and job experience.People reveal more about themselves and their character whenthey’re relaxed.PAGE 28 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring5) DON'T BELIEVE EVERYTHINGYOU READ ON A RESUMEThe statistics are well known: More than half the résuméssubmitted contain information that isn’t entirely true.Or at least some facts have been embellished.How to smoke out the real truth? Two ways: ocus on what the résumé DOESN’T say as much as onFwhat it does say. Are there gaps in the résumé? The candidatecould be trying to omit a job on which he knows he will geta fatal reference because he was fired for stealing orsome other offense. ore likely, the candidate may have overblown his or her roleMin a project or in specific achievements. A résumé entry like“Led new customer service initiative” may mean no more thanhaving stood at the door and handed out surveys. To ferret outthe truth, ask candidates what they actually did on a job or aproject, and encourage them to be as specific as possible.6) PLAY THE MOVIE FORWARD,NOT BACKWARDMany hiring managers start asking candidates to describe theirlast job, which is logical because it’s probably what prepared thecandidate most for the current job for which you’re consideringhim or her.The candidate is sure to come prepared to talk about that job, soyou will probably get well — rehearsed (and maybe somewhatembellished) answers.PAGE 29 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to HiringThis is counter-intuitive, but you might learn more if you ask thecandidate to start with the FIRST relevant job they ever had.It may well have been a formative experience, and thecandidate doesn’t expect the question — so you’re likelyto get more honest answers.7) ASK ABOUT REALACHIEVEMENTS, NOTHYPOTHETICALSMany well-intended hiring managers try to paint a picture ofsituations the candidate would encounter on the job if he or shewould be fortunate enough to get hired and then ask what thefuture employee would do when faced with such circumstances.The candidate will surely try to tell you what he or she thinks youwant to hear.Hypothetical questions and answers have proved to be of littlevalue in predicting future behavior.It is much better to learn what the candidate did in a previousposition. Try to find a close analogy with the possible futurejob, and ask the candidate what he or she actually did in acircumstance like that.A natural follow-up question is how it worked out, and what theylearned from such a high‑pressure situation.PAGE 30 / 42370 Technology DriveMalvern, PA 19355800-220-5000 2016 ResourcefulManagerAll rights reserved.

The ResourcefulManager's Guide to Hiring8) LEARN HOW MUCHTHEY WANT THE JOBThe worst thing that can happen

and may linger for a long time afterward. Here are some of the direct costs of hiring mistakes: . reviewing resumes, interviewing candidates (either by telephone or in person), checking references, negotiating contracts concerning working . If the new employee was supposed t