COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (CCSS) LOUISIANA GRADE-LEVEL .

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COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (CCSS)CCSS ID(Grade,Domain, GradeSpecificStandard No.) lityCountingandCardinalityClusterKnow number names and thecount sequence.Know number names and thecount sequence.CountingandCardinalityKnow number names and thecount sequence.LOUISIANA GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATIONS (GLE)CCSS1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.2. Count forward beginning from a givennumber within the known sequence(instead of having to begin at 1).GLE ID(ContentArea, Grade,GLE No.)M.1.1M.1.113. Write numbers from 0 to 20. Representa number of objects with a writtennumeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a countof no objects).M.K.4GLE1. Count to 100 by 1s, 5s, 10s,and 25s11. From a given numberbetween 1 and 100, countforward and backward4. Identify the numerals for thenumbers 0 through 20GLEGradeLevel11KAnalyst's CommentsThe strongest alignment is to a Grade 1GLE.The CCSS includes counting to 100 by 1sand by 10s. The only grade K GLE that is apotential match is M.K.1, which is count by1s to 20. Since the CCSS is significantlyabove M.K.1, no on-grade match wasdetermined.The strongest alignment is to a Grade 1GLE.The CCSS is specific to the known sequencewhich is count to 100 from CCSS K.CC.1.The only grade K GLE that is a potentialmatch is M.K.7, which is count from a givennumber between 1 and 10. Since the CCSSis significantly above GLE M.K.7, no ongrade match was determined.M.K.2 also aligns.The CCSS is specific in its requirement ofwriting numbers/numerals. M.K.4 onlyrequires identifying the numerals, but theintents of the CCSS and the GLE appear tobe the same.K.CC.4KCountingandCardinalityCount to tell the number ofobjects.4. Understand the relationship betweennumbers and quantities; connect countingto t to tell the number ofobjects.5. Count to answer ―how many?‖questions about as many as 20 thingsarranged in a line, a rectangular array, ora circle, or as many as 10 things in ascattered configuration; given a numberfrom 1–20, count out that many objects.M.K.22. Count a set of 20 or fewerobjects by establishing a 1-to-1correspondence betweennumber names and objects2. Count a set of 20 or fewerobjects by establishing a 1-to-1correspondence betweennumber names and objectsKK

K.CC.6KCountingandCardinalityCompare numbers.K.CC.7KCompare rationsandAlgebraicThinkingUnderstand addition as puttingtogether and adding to, andunderstand subtraction as takingapart and taking from.Understand addition as puttingtogether and adding to, andunderstand subtraction as takingapart and taking from.OperationsandAlgebraicThinkingUnderstand addition as puttingtogether and adding to, andunderstand subtraction as takingapart and taking from.OperationsandAlgebraicThinkingNumber andOperationsin Base TenUnderstand addition as puttingtogether and adding to, andunderstand subtraction as takingapart and taking from.Work with numbers 11–19 to gainfoundations for place nd addition as puttingtogether and adding to, andunderstand subtraction as takingapart and taking from.6. Identify whether the number of objectsin one group is greater than, less than, orequal to the number of objects in anothergroup, e.g., by using matching andcounting strategies.7. Compare two numbers between 1 and10 presented as written numerals.M.K.81. Represent addition and subtraction withobjects, fingers, mental images, drawings,sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations,verbal explanations, expressions, orequations.2. Solve addition and subtraction wordproblems, and add and subtract within 10,e.g., by using objects or drawings torepresent the problem.3. Decompose numbers less than orequal to 10 into pairs in more than oneway, e.g., by using objects or drawings,and record each decomposition by adrawing or equation (e.g., 5 2 3 and 5 4 1).4. For any number from 1 to 9, find thenumber that makes 10 when added to thegiven number, e.g., by using objects ordrawings, and record the answer with adrawing or equation.5. Fluently add and subtract within 5.M.K.91. Compose and decompose numbersfrom 11 to 19 into ten ones and somefurther ones, e.g., by using objects ordrawings, and record each composition ordecomposition by a drawing or equation(e.g., 18 10 8); understand that thesenumbers are composed of ten ones andone, two, three, four, five, six, seven,eight, or nine ones.8. Compare sets containing 20or fewer objects using thewords same/different andmore/less/greater/fewerKM.K.11 also aligns.No GLE match was found.M.K.99. Use concrete objects tomodel simple real-life additionand subtraction problemsK9. Use concrete objects tomodel simple real-life additionand subtraction problemsKM.K.10 also aligns.M.K.12 also aligns.M.K.12 also aligns.No GLE match was found.The CCSS includes specificity that is notfound in the GLEs.No GLE match was found.The CCSS includes specificity that is notfound in the GLEs.No GLE match was found.No GLE match was found.

K.MD.1KMeasurement and DataDescribe and comparemeasurable attributes.K.MD.2KMeasurement and DataDescribe and comparemeasurable attributes.K.MD.3KMeasurement and DataClassify objects and count thenumber of objects in eachcategory.K.G.1KGeometryIdentify and describe shapes(squares, circles, triangles,rectangles, hexagons, cubes,cones, cylinders, and spheres).K.G.2K.G.3KKGeometryGeometry1. Describe measurable attributes ofobjects, such as length or weight.Describe several measurable attributes ofa single object.No GLE match was found.The CCSS is specific in its focus ondescribing measurable attributes which is notfound in the GLEs.2. Directly compare two objects with ameasurable attribute in common, to seewhich object has ―more of‖/―less of‖ theattribute, and describe the difference. Forexample, directly compare the heights oftwo children and describe one child astaller/shorter.3. Classify objects into given categories;count the numbers of objects in eachcategory and sort the categories by count.M.K.1515. Use comparative andsuperlative vocabulary inmeasurement settings (e.g.,longest, shortest, most, hottest,heaviest, biggest )KM.K.2121. Collect and organizeconcrete data using tally markchartsK1. Describe objects in the environmentusing names of shapes, and describe therelative positions of these objects usingterms such as above, below, beside, infront of, behind, and next to .M.K.1616. Name and identify basicshapes using concrete models(e.g., circles, squares, triangles,rectangles, rhombuses, balls,boxes, cans, cones)KIdentify and describe shapes(squares, circles, triangles,rectangles, hexagons, cubes,cones, cylinders, and spheres).2. Correctly name shapes regardless oftheir orientations or overall size.Identify and describe shapes(squares, circles, triangles,rectangles, hexagons, cubes,cones, cylinders, and spheres).3. Identify shapes as two-dimensional(lying in a plane, ―flat‖) or threedimensional (―solid‖).The CCSS and the GLEs do not sharesimilar language regarding this CCSS.However, it was determined that the CCSSand M.K.21 have a similar, if not mostly thesame, intent.M.PK.10 also aligns.M.K.18 also aligns.The CCSS cluster statement includeshexagons which was not found in the alignedGLEs.No GLE match was found.M.PK.11 was considered as a possiblematch. However, it is not clear if the GLEmeans "recognize an object regardless of itsposition in space," or "recognize an object'sposition in space." Since the intent of theGLE could not be precisely determined, theGLE could not be considered a match for theCCSS.No GLE match was found.The CCSS includes specificity that is notfound in the GLEs.

K.G.4K.G.5KKGeometryGeometryAnalyze, compare, create, andcompose shapes.Analyze, compare, create, andcompose shapes.4. Analyze and compare two- and threedimensional shapes, in different sizes andorientations, using informal language todescribe their similarities, differences,parts (e.g., number of sides andvertices/―corners‖) and other attributes(e.g., having sides of equal length).M.K.175. Model shapes in the world by buildingshapes from components (e.g., sticks andclay balls) and drawing shapes.M.K.2017. Compare, contrast, and sortobjects or shapes according totwo attributes (e.g., shape andsize, shape and color, thicknessand color)K20. Draw circles, squares,rectangles, and trianglesKM.1.26 also aligns.M.2.21 also aligns.The CCSS includes specificity that is notfound in any single GLE. The intent of theCCSS is above the intent of M.K.17. For thisreason, the other GLE alignments are noted.The CCSS includes modeling shapes bybuilding shapes from components, which isnot found in the GLEs.From the cluster statement, the CCSSincludes hexagons, which is not found inM.K.20.K.G.6KGeometryAnalyze, compare, create, andcompose ent and solve problemsinvolving addition and epresent and solve problemsinvolving addition and subtraction.6. Compose simple shapes to form largershapes. For example, “Can you join thesetwo triangles with full sides touching tomake a rectangle?”1. Use addition and subtraction within 20to solve word problems involvingsituations of adding to, taking from,putting together, taking apart, andcomparing, with unknowns in all positions,e.g., by using objects, drawings, andequations with a symbol for the unknownnumber to represent the problem.M.K.192. Solve word problems that call foraddition of three whole numbers whosesum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., byusing objects, drawings, and equationswith a symbol for the unknown number torepresent the problem.M.1.12M.1.1219. Investigate the results ofcombining shapes (using papershapes, pattern blocks,tangrams, etc.)12. Know the basic facts foraddition and subtraction [0s, 1s,counting on and back 2s,doubles, doubles 1, then 10sfacts, and related turn-around(commutative) pairs] and usethem to solve real-life problemsK12. Know the basic facts foraddition and subtraction [0s, 1s,counting on and back 2s,doubles, doubles 1, then 10sfacts, and related turn-around(commutative) pairs] and usethem to solve real-life problems11M.2.8 also aligns.M.1.15 and M.1.18 also align.The CCSS includes specific situations forword problems that are not found in thegrade 1 GLEs. These situations are found inM.2.8. Inclusion of M.2.8 is required to coverthe full intent of the CCSS.M.1.15 also aligns.M.1.18 also aligns.The CCSS includes addition of three wholenumbers which is not specifically found inthe GLEs, but it is not specifically excludedeither. Since M.1.12 includes using basicfacts to solve real-life problems, it isreasonable to conclude that the CCSS andthe GLE have very similar intents.

1.OA.31OperationsandAlgebraicThinkingUnderstand and apply propertiesof operations and the relationshipbetween addition and subtraction.1.OA.41Understand and apply propertiesof operations and the relationshipbetween addition and lgebraicThinkingAdd and subtract within 20.1.OA.71OperationsandAlgebraicThinkingWork with addition andsubtraction equations.Add and subtract within 20.3. Apply properties of operations asstrategies to add and subtract. Examples:If 8 3 11 is known, then 3 8 11 isalso known. (Commutative property ofaddition.) To add 2 6 4, the secondtwo numbers can be added to make aten, so 2 6 4 2 10 12.(Associative property of addition.)4. Understand subtraction as an unknownaddend problem. For example, subtract10 – 8 by finding the number that makes10 when added to 8.5. Relate counting to addition andsubtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add2).M.1.1212. Know the basic facts foraddition and subtraction [0s, 1s,counting on and back 2s,doubles, doubles 1, then 10sfacts, and related turn-around(commutative) pairs] and usethem to solve real-life problems1M.1.1313. Recognize and applyaddition and subtraction asinverse operations1M.1.121The CCSS is the more general idea of howcounting is related to addition andsubtraction, whereas the GLE seems to bespecifically limited to counting on and back2s.6. Add and subtract within 20,demonstrating fluency for addition andsubtraction within 10. Use strategies suchas counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 6 8 2 4 10 4 14); decomposing anumber leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 13– 3 – 1 10 – 1 9); using therelationship between addition andsubtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 4 12,one knows 12 – 8 4); and creatingequivalent but easier or known sums(e.g., adding 6 7 by creating the knownequivalent 6 6 1 12 1 13).7. Understand the meaning of the equalsign, and determine if equations involvingaddition and subtraction are true or false.For example, which of the followingequations are true and which are false? 6 6, 7 8 – 1, 5 2 2 5, 4 1 5 2.M.1.1212. Know the basic facts foraddition and subtraction [0s, 1s,counting on and back 2s,doubles, doubles 1, then 10sfacts, and related turn-around(commutative) pairs] and usethem to solve real-life problems12. Know the basic facts foraddition and subtraction [0s, 1s,counting on and back 2s,doubles, doubles 1, then 10sfacts, and related turn-around(commutative) pairs] and usethem to solve real-life problems1M.1.13 also aligns.17. Use the equal sign ( ) toexpress the relationship ofequality1M.1.17The CCSS includes associative property (asan example) which is not found in M.1.12.

1.OA.81OperationsandAlgebraicThinkingWork with addition andsubtraction equations.8. Determine the unknown whole numberin an addition or subtraction equationrelating to three whole numbers. Forexample, determine the unknown numberthat makes the equation true in each ofthe equations 8 ? 11, 5 – 3, 6 6 .M.2.1313. Find the missing number inan equation involving additionor subtraction (e.g., # 4 7, 8- # 3)21.NBT.11Number andOperationsin Base TenExtend the counting sequence.1. Count to 120, starting at any numberless than 120. In this range, read andwrite numerals and represent a number ofobjects with a written numeral.M.1.11. Count to 100 by 1s, 5s, 10s,and 25s1Because the CCSS makes no mention ofuse of objects, pictures, and verbalinformation, the intent is that the unknownnumber can be determined based solely onthe other numbers in the equation. M.1.19was considered as a possible match, but itrequires the use of objects, pictures, andverbal information, which is not the sameintent as the CCSS.M.1.2 also aligns.M.1.11 also aligns.The CCSS includes numbers to 120, but theGLEs include numbers to 100. The CCSSincludes representing a number of objectswith a written numeral which is not found inthe GLEs.1.NBT.21Number andOperationsin Base TenUnderstand place value.1.NBT.31Number andOperationsin Base TenUnderstand place value.2. Understand that the two digits of a twodigit number represent amounts of tensand ones. Understand the following asspecial cases 3. Compare two two-digit numbers basedon meanings of the tens and ones digits,recording the results of comparisons withthe symbols , , and .M.1.5M.1.105. Model and read place valuein word, standard, andexpanded form for numbersthrough 9910. Using a number line orchart, locate, compare, andorder whole numbers less than100 and identify the numberscoming before/after a givennumber and between 2 givennumbers11M.3.2 also aligns.The CCSS includes comparing based onwhat is essentially place value, but M.1.10specifically relates comparison in terms ofusing a number line or chart. While thefundamental intents of the CCSS and theGLE are the same, there is a higherexpectation level in the CCSS than what isfound in the GLE.The CCSS includes recording comparisonswith the symbols , , and , but use of twoof these symbols does not occur until M.3.2.

1.NBT.41Number andOperationsin Base TenUse place value understandingand properties of operations toadd and subtract.1.NBT.51Number andOperationsin Base TenUse place value understandingand properties of operations toadd and subtract.1.NBT.61Number andOperationsin Base TenUse place value understandingand properties of operations toadd and subtract.1.MD.11Measurement and DataMeasure lengths indirectly and byiterating length units.4. Add within 100, including adding a twodigit number and a one-digit number, andadding a two-digit number and a multipleof 10, using concrete models or drawingsand strategies based on place value,properties of operations, and/or therelationship between addition andsubtraction; relate the strategy to a writtenmethod and explain the reasoning used.Understand that in adding two-digitnumbers, one adds tens and tens, onesand ones; and sometimes it is necessaryto compose a ten.5. Given a two-digit number, mentally find10 more or 10 less than the number,without having to count; explain thereasoning used.6. Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 1090 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90(positive or zero differences), usingconcrete models or drawings andstrategies based on place value,properties of operations, and/or therelationship between addition andsubtraction; relate the strategy to a writtenmethod and explain the reasoning used.M.1.141. Order three objects by length; comparethe lengths of two objects indirectly byusing a third object.M.1.2314. Add and subtract 2-digitnumbers using manipulatives1M.1.13 also aligns.The CCSS includes adding using strategiesbased on place value and properties ofoperations which is not found in M.1.14. GLEM.1.14 requires manipulatives only.The CCSS includes relating the strategy to awritten method and explaining the reasoningused which is not found in the GLEs.No GLE match was found.M.1.1414. Add and subtract 2-digitnumbers using manipulatives1M.1.13 also aligns.The CCSS includes subtracting usingstrategies based on place value andproperties of operations which is not found inM.1.14. GLE M.1.14 requires manipulativesonly.23. Compare the measure ofobjects to benchmarks (e.g.,the width of a child’s thumb isabout a centimeter, the weightof a loaf of bread is about apound, and the mass of atextbook is about a kilogram)1The CCSS includes relating the strategy to awritten method and explaining the reasoningused which is not found in the GLEs.The CCSS includes ordering three objects bylength which is not specifically found in theGLEs.

1.MD.21Measurement and DataMeasure lengths indirectly and byiterating length units.2. Express the length of an object as awhole number of length units, by layingmultiple copies of a shorter object (thelength unit) end to end; understand thatthe length measurement of an object isthe number of same-size length units thatspan it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit tocontexts where the object beingmeasured is spanned by a whole numberof length units with no gaps or overlaps.M.K.1414. Measure and estimatelength and capacity using nonstandard units (e.g., sticks,paper clips, blocks, beans)K1.MD.31Measurement and DataTell and write time.3. Tell and write time in hours and halfhours using analog and digital clocks.M.1.2111.MD.41Measurement and DataRepresent and interpret data.M.1.321.G.11GeometryReason with shapes and theirattributes.4. Organize, represent, and interpret datawith up to three categories; ask andanswer questions about the total numberof data points, how many in eachcategory, and how many more or less arein one category than in another.1. Distinguish between defining attributes(e.g., triangles are closed and threesided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g.,color, orientation, overall size); build anddraw shapes to possess definingattributes.2. Compose two-dimensional shapes(rectangles, squares, trapezoids,triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles)or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, rightrectangular prisms, right circular cones,and right circular cylinders) to create acomposite sha

COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (CCSS) LOUISIANA GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATIONS (GLE) CCSS ID (Grade, Domain, Grade-Specific Standard No.) Grade Domain Cluster CCSS GLE ID (Content Area, Grade, GLE No.) GLE GLE Grade Level Analyst's Comments K.CC.1 K Counting and Cardinality Know number names and the count sequence. 1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens. M .

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