Chapter 10: Emergency Planning - NPS

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Chapter 10: Emergency PlanningNPS Museum Emergency Planning OverviewPage---A. Overview . 10:1What is included in this chapter? . 10:1What kinds of emergency incidents are addressed in this chapter? . 10:3Who is responsible for museum emergency planning? . 10:3What are the emergency operations coordinator’s responsibilities for emergency planning? . 10:4What are the facility manager’s responsibilities for museum emergency planning? . 10:4What is the interdisciplinary team’s role in museum emergency planning? . 10:5What is the Incident Command System (ICS)? . 10:5What terms are used in this chapter? . 10:6B. DOI and NPS Museum Emergency Planning Policies and Standards . 10:7DOI Departmental Manuals . 10:7NPS Museum Emergency Planning and Preparedness Standards . 10:7NPS emergency planning policies . 10:8C. Risk Assessment . 10:8What is risk assessment? . 10:8What risk assessments are used to identify hazards and vulnerabilities? . 10:9D. Museum Mitigation Action Plan . 10:10Museum Mitigation Action Plan overview . 10:10Decision not to implement corrective actions . 10:10Mitigation funding . 10:11Arranging services in advance of an emergency incident . 10:11Planning for a secure salvage area . 10:11Planning for rapid emergency entry to collections . 10:12Protecting the accession (and deaccession) book and folders . 10:12Completing regular backups and scans . 10:12Object location and inventory information . 10:12E. Mitigating Hazards and Vulnerabilities . 10:13Mitigation for objects in storage . 10:13Mitigation for objects on exhibit . 10:14Mitigation for structures housing collections . 10:14Construction and hot work damage mitigation . 10:15Earthquake damage mitigation . 10:15Fire damage mitigation . 10:16Hazardous materials spills, exposure, and explosion damage mitigation . 10:16Medical incident mitigation . 10:17Mold outbreak mitigation . 10:17Power outage mitigation . 10:18Severe weather damage mitigation . 10:19Vandalism damage mitigation . 10:20Volcanic damage mitigation . 10:21Water leak and flood mitigation . 10:21F. Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan . 10:23Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan (MCEOP) contents . 10:23MCEOP team leader responsibilities . 10:24MCEOP team member responsibilities . 10:25Restricting Relocation and Salvage First Priority information . 10:26Emergency Response Steps included in the MCEOP . 10:26Emergency contact list . 10:26NPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)

Emergency supplies and equipment . 10:27Floor plans . 10:27Review and update cycle . 10:27G. Museum Emergency Response . 10:28Emergency Response Steps for different emergency incidents . 10:28Actions taken with advance notice . 10:29Shelter in Place . 10:29National sources of assistance . 10:29Posting emergency response information . 10:30H. Relocating Museum Objects . 10:30How are object First Priorities for Relocation and Salvage determined? . 10:30How are First Priority objects and museum records identified for relocation? . 10:31What are the considerations for seasonal, remote, and high risk areas? . 10:31When does relocation happen? . 10:31Where should objects be relocated? . 10:31I.Salvaging Museum Objects . 10:32Procedures before beginning salvage . 10:32Access to the salvage area . 10:32Determining which objects should be salvaged . 10:32Salvage procedures for different types of damage . 10:32J.Training and Documentation . 10:33What training is needed? . 10:33What emergency drills and exercises should be conducted? . 10:33What documentation is needed? . 10:34What are the Post-Emergency Critique and After-Action Review? . 10:34K. Bibliography . 10:34L. List of Figures . 10:37Figure 10.1: Museum Emergency Planning Cycle . 10:2Figure 10.2: Risk Assessment Worksheet (Click here for Fillable Risk Assessment Worksheet) .10:38Figure 10.3: Museum Mitigation Action Plan (Sample) (Blank) . 10:48Figure 10.3a: Museum Mitigation Action Plan (Sample) (Completed) . 10:49Figure 10.3b: Record of the Decision Not to Implement Corrective Actions in aStructure Housing Collections . 10:50Figure 10.4: Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan (Sample) . 10:51Emergency Response Steps . 10:65Figure 10.5: Active Shooter Emergency Response Steps . 10:66Figure 10.6: Disruptive Individual Emergency Response Steps . 10:67Figure 10.7: Earthquake Emergency Response Steps . 10:68Figure 10.8: Explosion Emergency Response Steps . 10:69Figure 10.9: Fire Emergency Response Steps . 10:70Figure 10.10: Hazardous Materials Spill, Odor, and Gas Leak Emergency Response Steps . 10:71Figure 10.11: Medical Emergency Response Steps . 10:72Figure 10.12: Mold Outbreak Emergency Response Steps . 10:73Figure 10.13: Power Outage Emergency Response Steps . 10:74Figure 10.14: Severe Weather Emergency Response Steps . 10:75Figure 10.15: Suspicious Package or Item Emergency Response Steps . 10:76Figure 10.16: Suspicious Person and Vandalism Emergency Response Steps . 10:77Figure 10.17: Threat (Threatening Call or Bomb Threat) Emergency Response Steps . 10:78Figure 10.18: Volcanic Eruption Emergency Response Steps . 10:79Figure 10.19: Water Leak and Flood Emergency Response Steps . 10:80NPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)

Figure 10.20: First Priority Criteria for Object Relocation and Salvage . 10:30Figure 10.21: Emergency Contact List (Sample) . 10:81Figure 10.22: Emergency Vendor and Sources of Assistance List (Sample) . 10:82Figure 10.23: Emergency Supplies and Equipment (Sample) . 10:83Figure 10.24: Salvage Procedures . 10:84Before Salvage . 10:84Preparing the Salvage Area . 10:84General Salvage Procedures . 10:84Mold . 10:85Water Damage to Objects . 10:85Water Damage to Spaces Housing Collections . 10:86Figure 10.25: Collection Damage and Salvage Overview . 10:87Figure 10.26: Post-Emergency Critique . 10:88M. Glossary . 10:90N. Abbreviations . 10:93O. Index . 10:94NPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)

NPS Museum Emergency Planning OverviewNPS Museum Emergency Planning and Preparedness StandardsDevelop, approve, keep current, and implement a Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan (MCEOP) as part of thepark Emergency Operations Plan in accordance with Director’s Order (DO) 24.4.3.10: Emergency Operation, that addressesmuseum collection requirements for emergency protection, response, relocation, and salvage. Review the MCEOPannually and update every five years.Develop Emergency Response Steps for different emergency incidents in the MCEOP.Implement the NPS Checklist for Preservation and Protection of Museum Collections to identify and document hazards toand vulnerabilities of museum collections and structures and spaces housing collections in accordance with DO 24.4.3.21:Checklist. Review and submit to the National Catalog annually in accordance with DO 24.5.2: Checklist.Develop a Museum Mitigation Action Plan that includes corrective actions to be implemented to remove or reduce hazardsand vulnerabilities identified in risk assessments. Review annually and update every five years.Mitigate hazards and vulnerabilities identified in the Museum Mitigation Action Plan or relocate objects at risk to a designatedsecure and stable location.Risk AssessmentComplete the NPS Checklist for Preservation and Protection of Museum Collections annually. Complete the ObjectAssessment, Risk Assessment Worksheet, and other risk assessments.Museum Mitigation Action PlanDevelop a Museum Mitigation Action Plan that includes corrective actions to be implemented to remove or reduce hazardsand vulnerabilities in structures and spaces housing collections. Review annually and update every five years.Mitigating Hazards and VulnerabilitiesImplement corrective actions identified in the Museum Mitigation Action Plan to remove or reduce identified hazards andvulnerabilities in collaboration with the facility manager, emergency operations coordinator, and interdisciplinary team.Museum Collections Emergency Operations PlanDevelop and implement a Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan (MCEOP) as part of the park EmergencyOperations Plan. Review the MCEOP annually and update every five years.The MCEOP includes sections on: Museum Emergency Planning Standards and Policies; Incident Command System (ICS);Collections and Structures Housing Collections Overview; Risk Assessment; MCEOP Team Responsibilities; First Prioritiesfor Relocation and Salvage; Emergency Response, including Emergency Response Steps; Security; Emergency ContactInformation; Emergency Equipment, Services, and Supplies; Salvage Procedures; Post-Emergency Critique; MCEOPUpdate and Review; and Figures and Floor Plans.Museum Emergency Response StepsImplement Emergency Response Steps for different types of emergency incidents, including:Active Shooter; Disruptive Individual; Earthquake; Explosion; Fire; Hazardous Materials Spill, Odor, and Gas Leak; MedicalEmergency; Mold Outbreak; Power Outage; Severe Weather; Suspicious Package or Item; Suspicious Person andVandalism; Threat (Threatening Call or Bomb Threat); Volcanic Eruption; and Water Leak and Flood.Follow Incident Command System (ICS) procedures when activated.Relocation and SalvageIdentify First Priorities for Relocation and Salvage before an emergency incident using the First Priority Criteria for ObjectRelocation and Salvage (Figure 10.20) and Object Assessment (Figure 9.3).Implement relocation and salvage procedures within the first 48 – 72 hours after an emergency incident.Training and DocumentationConduct annual emergency training and response exercises for museum staff, including ICS training, in collaboration withthe emergency operations coordinator.Document all museum emergency planning and preparedness activities.Complete a Post-Emergency Critique (Figure 10.26) within a month of the emergency incident.NPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)10:1

CHAPTER 10: EMERGENCY PLANNINGA. OverviewEmergencies pose a threat to life safety, museum collections, and structureshousing collections. They may be large- or small-scale and occur due tonatural or human causes. Emergencies may occur as a single incident or asa complex of two or more, with or without warning.Emergency planning includes risk assessment, removal or reduction ofhazards and vulnerabilities, and implementation of emergency operationsplans, Emergency Response Steps, and salvage procedures. When planningand preparing for museum emergencies, consider what impact the loss of ordamage to the collection and structures housing collections would have onthe park mission and programs.Take corrective actions to mitigate identified hazards and vulnerabilitiesbefore an emergency incident occurs. Pre-incident actions ensure responseand salvage activities taken during and after an emergency incident areimplemented without confusion, delay, and unnecessary loss or damage.A.1. What is included inthis chapter?This chapter covers museum emergency planning and preparedness forcollections and structures housing collections. It includes (in order ofappearance in the chapter): National Park Service (NPS) Museum Emergency Planning andPreparedness StandardsSection B: DOI and NPS Emergency Planning Policies and Standards Risk assessments to identify hazards and vulnerabilities Museum Mitigation Action Plan including corrective actions to removeor reduce identified hazards and vulnerabilitiesSection C: Risk Assessment, Appendix F Figure F.2: NPS Checklist for Preservation andProtection of Museum Collections, and Figure 10.2: Risk Assessment WorksheetSection D: Museum Mitigation Action Plan and Figure 10.3: Museum Mitigation ActionPlan (Sample) Mitigation of hazards and vulnerabilities through implementation of theMuseum Mitigation Action PlanSection E: Mitigating Hazards and Vulnerabilities Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan (MCEOP) appendedto the park Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)Section F: Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan and Figure 10.4: MuseumCollections Emergency Operations Plan (Sample) Emergency Response Steps for different emergency incidentsSection G: Museum Emergency Response and Figures 10.5 – 10.19: EmergencyResponse StepsDetermination of object relocation and salvage priorities using the FirstPriority Criteria for Object Relocation and SalvageSection H: Relocating Museum Objects, Figure 10.20: First Priority Criteria for ObjectRelocation and Salvage, and Figure 9.3: Object AssessmentNPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)10:1

Salvage procedures for affected objects Training and documentation for museum emergency planning andpreparednessSection I: Salvaging Museum Objects and Figure 10.24: Salvage ProceduresSection J: Training and Documentation Figures and templates for customization by parks, including MCEOP,Emergency Response Steps, and emergency contact and supply andequipment listsFigure 10.21: Emergency Contact List (Sample), Figure 10.22: Emergency Vendor andSources of Assistance List (Sample), and Figure 10.23: Emergency Supplies andEquipment (Sample)The Museum Emergency Planning Cycle (Figure 10.1) provides a visualrepresentation of the ongoing museum emergency planning and preparednessprocess.Assess Risk &Identify Hazards &VulnerabilitiesNPS Checklist for Preservation &Protection of Museum CollectionsRisk Assessment WorksheetObject AssessmentFirst Priority Criteria for ObjectRelocation & SalvageDevelop & ImplementMuseum Mitigation Action Plan toMitigate Hazards & VulnerabilitiesDevelop Museum CollectionsEmergency Operations Plan (MCEOP)Emergency Response StepsMCEOP TeamIncident Command SystemAccess & Key Control Policies & ProceduresDesignated Secure & Stable LocationEmergency Contact InformationVendors & Sources of AssistanceEmergency Supplies & EquipmentRelocation & Salvage First PrioritiesSalvage ProceduresFigures & Floor PlansRelocateFirst Priority ObjectsEvacuate toDesignated Assembly Pointor Shelter in PlaceEmergency Response StepsActive ShooterDisruptive IndividualEarthquakeExplosionFireHazardous Materials Spill, Odor, & Gas LeakMedical EmergencyMold OutbreakPower OutageSevere WeatherSuspicious Package or ItemSuspicious Person & VandalismThreat (Threatening Call or Bomb Threat)Volcanic EruptionWater Leak & FloodFollow Incident Command System ProceduresMobilize MCEOP TeamRelocate & Salvage Objectswithin 48 – 72 hoursArrange for Professional ConservationComplete Post-Emergency CritiqueUpdate Plans & ImplementCorrective ActionsFigure 10.1. Museum Emergency Planning CycleThis chapter does not address emergency planning and preparedness forlaboratories or wildland fires.NPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)10:2

A.2. What kinds ofemergency incidentsare addressed in thischapter?Emergency incidents that impact collections, structures housing collections,and/or life safety include (in alphabetical order): Active shooter Disruptive individual Earthquake Explosion Fire Hazardous materials spill, odor, and gas leak Medical emergency Mold outbreak Power outage Severe weather Suspicious package or item Suspicious person and vandalism Threat (threatening call or bomb threat) Volcanic eruption Water leak and floodSee Section E: Mitigating Hazards and Vulnerabilities and Figures 10.5 – 10.19: EmergencyResponse Steps. See also Chapter 5: Biological Infestations, Chapter 9: Museum FireProtection, Chapter 11: Curatorial Health and Safety, and Chapter 14: Museum Security.A.3. Who is responsible formuseum emergencyplanning?The superintendent has overall responsibility for preserving and protecting thepark’s museum collection. The curator, as designated custodial officer, isresponsible for preserving and protecting the museum collection, includingmuseum emergency planning and preparedness. In this chapter, “curator”refers to the park curator or collateral duty staff designated as responsible forthe collection.The curator is responsible for developing and completing: Risk assessments including:̶̶NPS Checklist for Preservation and Protection of MuseumCollections (Appendix F, Figure F.2)Risk Assessment Worksheet (Figure 10.2) Museum Mitigation Action Plan (Figure 10.3). Museum Collections Emergency Operations Plan (MCEOP) (Figure 10.4),in collaboration with the emergency operations coordinator and facilitymanager. Prioritization of objects for relocation and salvage using the FirstNPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)10:3

Priority Criteria for Object Relocation and Salvage (Figure 10.20). Object Assessment (Figure 9.3).The curator collaborates with the:A.4. What are theemergency operationscoordinator’sresponsibilities foremergency planning? Emergency operations coordinator to coordinate museum emergencyresponse and salvage activities and training. Facility manager to develop and implement the Museum MitigationAction Plan.The superintendent is responsible for park-wide emergency planning andpreparedness. The superintendent may delegate responsibilities foremergency operations coordination to the chief ranger, park safety officer,facility manager, or other staff as appropriate. This delegation is made inwriting and filed in the park central files and/or Superintendent’s Orders.The emergency operations coordinator will:A.5. What are the facilitymanager’sresponsibilities formuseum emergencyplanning? Develop and maintain park emergency planning documents, includingthe park Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), and coordinate park-wideemergency planning and response. Append the MCEOP to the park EOP, in collaboration with the curator. Develop and implement emergency response and situational awarenesstraining for park employees. Arrange for a Physical Security Assessment for each structure housingcollections, in collaboration with park security and the curator.The facility manager works with the curator and emergency operationscoordinator to: Ensure regular inspection, testing, and maintenance of the structure andbuilding envelope, utilities, equipment, and systems in structures andspaces housing collections in accordance with nationally-recognizedcodes, manufacturer’s specifications, and NPS policies and guidance. Complete a comprehensive condition assessment of the buildingenvelope, utilities, equipment, and systems for structures housingcollections. Generate information on: availability of physical resources such as power and waterexisting utilities and mechanical systems and controls in spaceshousing collectionsfunding needed to install, upgrade, and replace equipment andsystemsNPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)10:4

Implement corrective actions in the Museum Mitigation Action Plan incollaboration with the curator and other specialists. Recommend and install equipment, utilities, and structural componentsin structures housing collections, including water, HVAC systems,power, and lighting. Develop work orders using the Facility Management Software System(FMSS), Project Management Information System (PMIS) statements,and Scopes of Work for structures and spaces housing collections, incollaboration with the curator. Coordinate new construction and renovation of structures and spaceshousing collections. Coordinate landscaping adjacent to structures housing collections.See Section D.3: Mitigation funding. See also the NPS Denver Service Center Design andConstruction Division website.A.6. What is theinterdisciplinary team’srole in museumemergency planning?The interdisciplinary team, coordinated by the curator, participates inplanning and preparedness for museum emergencies. The team shouldinclude the emergency operations coordinator, facility manager, safetyofficer, Park Structural Fire Coordinator (PSFC), Regional Structural FireManager (RSFM) or Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ), chief ranger,chief of cultural and/or natural resources, and regional curator. Include thehistorical architect advisor, cultural landscape specialist, conservator, andother specialists as needed. The team should meet regularly to discussemergency planning and mitigation projects.A.7. What is the IncidentCommand System(ICS)?The Incident Command System (ICS) is a uniform, scalable commandstructure that can be activated to address park-wide emergency incidents. Itis also used for planned events.NPS emergency operations are conducted using ICS as part of the NationalIncident Management System (NIMS). The Unified Command System isused when other agencies are involved. Under ICS, the IncidentCommander (IC) has overall responsibility for managing the emergencyincident. Once ICS is activated, park emergency response actions,including actions for the museum program, fall under the IC’s authority.The curator should: Ensure that collections and structures housing collections are addressedin park ICS planning documents, including the Continuity ofOperations Plan (COOP). Liaise with the ICS Operations Section Chief and participate inplanning meetings to represent collections needs and coordinate actionsthat impact collections and structures housing collections.NPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapter 10: Emergency Planning (2019)10:5

Arrange for ICS training for all museum staff.In the event that wildland fire impacts collections and structures housingcollections, work with the IC and/or park Fire Management Officer toimplement the steps outlined in the MCEOP.See Section J.1: What training is needed? See also DO 55: Incident Management Program:5.3: Incident and Ev

Emergency Response Steps, and emergency contact and supply and equipment lists. Figure 10.21: Emergency Contact List (Sample), Figure 10.22: Emergency Vendor and Sources of Assistance List (Sample), and Figure 10.23: Emergency Supplies and Equipment (Sample) The Museum Emergency Planning Cycle (Figure 10.1) provides a visual )

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