Alloy Data S E C T I O N 3

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Alloy DataSection ContentssectionNADCA No.FormatFrequently Asked Questions (FAQ)Page3-21 Die Casting Alloy Cross Reference Designations3-22 Aluminum Alloys3-4Selecting Aluminum Alloys33-4Aluminum Alloy Chemical CompositionA-3-1-15Standard3-5Aluminum Alloy PropertiesA-3-2-15Standard3-6Aluminum Alloy CharacteristicsA-3-3-15Guidelines3-73 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites33-12Selecting Aluminum Composites3-12Aluminum Composites Chemical CompositionA-3-4-15Standard3-13Aluminum Composites PropertiesA-3-5-15Standard3-14Aluminum Composites CharacteristicsA-3-6-15Guidelines3-154 Copper Alloys3-16Selecting Copper Alloys3-16Copper Alloy Chemical CompositionA-3-7-15Standard3-17Copper Alloy PropertiesA-3-8-15Standard3-18Copper Alloy CharacteristicsA-3-9-15Guidelines3-195 Magnesium Alloys3-20Selecting Magnesium Alloys3-20Magnesium Alloy Chemical CompositionA-3-10-15Standard3-21Magnesium Alloy PropertiesA-3-11-15Standard3-22Magnesium Alloy CharacteristicsA-3-12-15Guidelines3-236 Zinc and ZA Alloys3-26Selecting Zinc and ZA Alloys3-26Zinc and ZA Alloy Chemical CompositionA-3-13-15Standard3-27Zinc and ZA Alloy PropertiesA-3-14-15Standard3-28Zinc and ZA Alloy CharacteristicsA-3-15-15Guidelines3-29High Fluidity (HF) Properties and Composition3-307 Selecting An Alloy Family3-328 Quick Guide to Alloy Family Selection3-339 Elevated Temperature Properties3-3410 Property Comparison3-3811 Cross Reference: Alloy Designation andComposition3-42NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 20153-1

Alloy DataThe cross reference designations shown are for alloyspecifications according towidely recognized sources.References apply to the metalin the die cast conditionand should not be confusedwith similar specificationsfor metal ingot. A “—“ ina column indicates that thespecific alloy is not registered by the given source.Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)1) Is there a cross reference available for different alloy designations?See pages 3-2, 3-3 all charts and pages 3-42 through 3-45.2) W hat type of material best fits my application?See page 3-33, Quick Guide to Alloy Family Selection.3) How do die cast properties compare to sand cast properties?See pages 3-38 through 3-41, Property Comparison.4) W here can I find general material properties for Aluminum Alloys?See pages 3-4 through 3-11.5) How can I determine if certain die casting alloys would be a better choice for thermal conductivity? See row “Thermal Conductivity” in tables found on pages 3-6, 3-14, 3-18, 3-22, 3-28,and 3-30.1Die Casting Alloy Cross Reference DesignationsAluminum Alloy SpecificationsCommercial360A360 a380 cA380 a383Table of SymbolsUNS —UnifiedNumberingSystemANSI — AmericanNationalStandardsInstituteASTM — AmericanSociety forTesting SG100Ac A13800 840B390A23900A13 aA141301343218SC84B383.0384A384 �305304—bDIN g1725JIS H 5302233ADC3226A e ADC10 CD226A e ADC12 CDADC12 CDADC12 CD231D fADC1 c341a Similar to preceding entry with slight variations in minor constituents. b The Federal specification for aluminum alloyAA —AluminumAssociationSAE —Society ofAutomotiveEngineersdie castings uses the Aluminum Association designations for individual alloys. Military designations superseded by Federalspecifications. c NADCA and Japanese specifications allow 0.3 magnesium maximum. d Japanese specifications allow 1.0zinc maximum. e DIN 1725 spec allows 1.2 max zinc and up to 0.5 max magnesium. f DIN 1725 spec allows 0.3 maxmagnesium. g Alloy compositions shown in DIN 1725 tend to be “primary based” and have low impurity limits making itdifficult to correlate directly to U.S. alloys.FED —FederalSpecificationsNote: Some of these standards are obsolete but included here for historical purposes. For closest cross-reference refer to the tables of foreignalloy designations and chemical constituencies at the end of this section. All specifications are for castings only.MIL —MilitarySpecificationsJIS —JapaneseIndustrialStandardDIN —GermanIndustrialStandard3-2NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 2015

Alloy DataAluminum Metal Matrix Composite Alloy SpecificationsRio Tinto AlcanCANADAUNSCopper Alloy SpecificationsAACommercialUNSASTM B176 SAE 2997C99700——997.5C99750——3Magnesium Alloy SpecificationsCommercialUNSASTMB93 & B94FormerSAE A——M10412———Federal aDIN1729QQ-M-38 3.5912.05JIS H 2222& H �———a Th is Federal Specification has been canceled and is shown for historic reference only.Note: For closest cross-reference refer to the tables of foreign alloy designations and chemical constituencies at the end of this section.Zinc and ZA Alloy SpecificationsCommercialUNSASTMB86FormerSAE J469Federal JIS H 5301ZDC-2ZDC-1——a This Federal Specification has been canceled and is shown for historic reference only.Note: For closest cross-reference refer to the tables of foreign alloy designations and chemical constituencies at the end of this section.NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 2015Table of SymbolsUNS —UnifiedNumberingSystemANSI — AmericanNationalStandardsInstituteASTM — AmericanSociety forTesting andMaterialsAA —AluminumAssociationSAE —Society ofAutomotiveEngineersFED —FederalSpecificationsMIL —MilitarySpecificationsJIS —JapaneseIndustrialStandardDIN —GermanIndustrialStandard3-3

Alloy Data2Aluminum AlloysSelecting Aluminum AlloysAluminum (Al) die casting alloys have a specific gravity of approximately 2.7 g/cc, placing them amongthe lightweight structural metals. The majority of die castings produced worldwide are made fromaluminum alloys.Six major elements constitute the die cast aluminum alloy system: silicon, copper, magnesium, iron,manganese, and zinc. Each element affects the alloy both independently and interactively.This aluminum alloy subsection presents guideline tables for chemical composition, typical properties, and die casting, machining and finishing characteristics for 11 aluminum die casting alloys.This data can be used in combination with design engineering tolerancing guidelines for aluminumdie casting and can be compared with the guidelines for other alloys in this section and in the designengineering section.Alloy A380 (ANSI/AA A380.0) is by far the most widely cast of the aluminum die casting alloys,offering the best combination of material properties and ease of production. It may be specified formost product applications. Some of the uses of this alloy include electronic and communicationsequipment, automotive components, engine brackets, transmission and gear cases, appliances, lawnmower housings, furniture components, hand and power tools.Alloy 383 (ANSI/AA 383.0) and alloy 384 (ANSI/AA 384.0) are alternatives to A380 for intricatecomponents requiring improved die filling characteristics. Alloy 383 offers improved resistance to hotcracking (strength at elevated temperatures).Alloy A360 (ANSI/AA A360.0) offers higher corrosion resistance, superior strength at elevatedtemperatures, and somewhat better ductility, but is more difficult to cast.While not in wide use and difficult to cast, alloy 43 (ANSI/AA C443.0) offers the highest ductilityin the aluminum family. It is moderate in corrosion resistance and often can be used in marine gradeapplications.Alloy A13 (ANSI/AA A413.0) offers excellent pressure tightness, making it a good choice forhydraulic cylinders and pressure vessels. Its casting characteristics make it useful for intricate components.Alloy B390 (ANSI/AA B390.0) was developed for automotive engine blocks. Its resistance to wear isexcellent but, its ductility is low. It is used for die cast valve bodies and sleeve-less piston housings.Alloy 218 (ANSI/AA 518.0) provides the best combination of strength, ductility, corrosion resistance and finishing qualities, but it is more difficult to die cast.* Different sets of properties can be achieved with alternate processes (such as high vacuum, squeeze,and semi-solid casting) and alternate alloys (such as A356, Aural 2 or 356, and Silafont 36). Information on these processes and alloys can be found in the Product Specification Standards for Die castingsproduced by Semi-Solid and Squeeze Cast Processes (NADCA Publication #403) and the HighIntegrity Die Castings book (NADCA Publication #404).Machining CharacteristicsMachining characteristics vary somewhat among the commercially available aluminum die castingalloys, but the entire group is superior to iron, steel and titanium. The rapid solidification rate associated with the die casting process makes die casting alloys somewhat superior to wrought and gravitycast alloys of similar chemical composition.Alloy A380 has better than average machining characteristics. Alloy 218, with magnesium themajor alloying element, exhibits among the best machinability. Alloy 390, with the highest siliconcontent and free silicon constituent, exhibits the lowest.Surface Treatment SystemsSurface treatment systems are applied to aluminum die castings to provide a decorative finish, to forma protective barrier against environmental exposure, and to improve resistance to wear.Decorative finishes can be applied to aluminum die castings through painting, powder coat finishing, polishing, epoxy finishing, and electro-chemical processing. Aluminum can be plated by applyingan initial immersion zinc coating, followed by conventional copper-nickel-chromium plating procedure3-4NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 2015

Alloy DataNADCAA-3-1-15STANDARDsimilar to that used for plating zinc metal/alloys.Protection against environmental corrosion for aluminum die castings is achieved through painting,anodizing, chromating, and iridite coatings.Improved wear resistance can be achieved with aluminum die castings by hard anodizing.Where a part design does not allow the production of a pressure-tight die casting through control ofporosity by gate and overflow die design, the location of ejector pins, and the reconfiguration of hardto-cast features, impregnation of aluminum die castings can be used. Systems employing anaerobicsand methacrylates are employed to produce sealed, pressure-tight castings with smooth surfaces. Adetailed discussion of finishing methods for aluminum die castings can be found in Product Design ForDie Casting.Table A-3-1 Chemical Composition: Al Alloys3All single values are maximum composition percentages unless otherwise stated.Aluminum Die Casting Alloys aECommercial: 360ANSI/AA360.0A360A360.0380 b380.0A380 bA380.0383383.0384 ominalComp:Mg 0.5Si 9.5Cu 3.5Si 8.5Cu 3.5Si 8.5Cu 2.5Si 10.5Cu 3.8Si 11.0Cu 4.5Si 17.0Si 12.0Si 12.0Si 5.0Mg 8.0Mg 0.5Si 9.0Deta i led Composit ckelNiZincZnTinSnTitaniumTiOthersEachTotalOthers 0.5-12.0 16.0-18.0 11.0-13.0 11.0-13.0 4-0.60.4-0.60.30 f0.30 nceBalanceBalanceBalanceBalanceBalanceBalancea Analysis shall ordinarily be made only for the elements mentioned in this table. If, however, the presence of other elements is suspected, or indicated in the course of routineanalysis, further analysis shall be made to determine that the total of these other elements are not present in excess of specified limits. b With respect to mechanical properties, alloysA380.0, 383.0 and 384.0 are substantially interchangeable. c For RoHS (the European Union’s Directive on Restriction of Hazardous Substances) compliance, certificationof chemical analysis is required to ensure that the “total others” category does not exceed the following weight percent limits: 0.01% cadmium, 0.4% lead, and 0.1% mercury.Hexavalent chromium does not exist in the alloys and therefore meets the 0.1% limit. D Notched Charpy. Sources: ASTM B85-92a; ASM; SAE; Wabash Alloys. E Registrationfor REACH (the European Union’s Directive on Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of Chemicals) is not required for die castings, even if coated, since die castings areconsidered articles. Notification may be required if some contained substances in the die casting or coating exceed the 0.1% total weight of the article level and are listed as SVHC(substances of very high concern). f NADCA allows 0.30 maximum magnesium as opposed to 0.10. A380 with 0.30 magnesium has been registered with the AluminumAssociation as E380 and 383 with 0.30 magnesium as B383.* Two other aluminum alloys, 361 and 369, are being utilized in limited applications where vibration and wear are of concern. There are also other heat treatable specialty alloysavailable for structural applications, such as the Silafonts and AA365, and high ductility, high strength alloys such as Mercalloy and K-Alloy. Contact your alloy producer for moreinformation. Sources: ASTM B85-92a; Aluminum Association.NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 20153-5

Alloy DataNADCAA-3-2-15Typical values based on “as-cast” characteristicsfor separately die cast specimens, not specimens cutfrom production die castings.STANDARDTable A-3-2 Typical Material Properties: Al AlloysAluminum Die Casting AlloysCommercial:ANSI/AA360360.0A360380A360.0 380.0A380 EF 383 EA380.0 383.0384384.0B390*B390.013413.0A1343218A413.0 C443.0 518.0Mecha nica l Proper t iesUltimate Tensile 4(97)28(193)2.53.53.53.53.52.5 )0.096(2.66)0.097(2.69)0.093(2.57)Yield Strength aksi25(172)(MPa)Elongation% in 2in.(51mm)Hardness bBHNShear Strengthksi(MPa)Impact Strengthft-lb—(J)Fatigue Strength cksi20(138)(MPa)Young’s Moduluspsi x 10 610.3(71)(GPa)Physica l Proper t iesDensitylb/in 3(g/cm3)Melting Range F( C)Specific HeatBTU/lb F(J/kg C)0.095(2.63)1035-1105 1035-1105 1000-1100 1000-1100 960-1080 960-1080 950-1200 1065-1080 1065-1080 1065-1170 995-1150(557-596) (557-596) (540-595) (540-595) (516-582) (516-582) (510-650) (574-582) (574-582) (574-632) (535-621)0.230(963)0.230(963)0.230(963)Coefficient of Thermal Expansionm in/in F11.611.612.2(21.0)(21.0)(22.0)(m m/m K)Thermal ConductivityBTU/ft hr F65.3(113)(W/m K)Electrical Conductivity30% IACSPoisson’s 32227313137240.330.330.330.33————0.33—a 0.2% offset. b 500 kg load, 10mm ball. c Rotary Bend 5 x 10cycles. d Notched Charpy. Sources: ASTM B85-92a; ASM; SAE; Wabash Alloys. E A 0.3% Mgversion of A380 and 383 have been registered with the Aluminum Association as E380 and B383. F Higher levels of Mg and the addition of Sr to alloy A380 have shownpositive results. The limited data on pages 3-7 - 3-11 shows the effect.8* Two other aluminum alloys, 361 and 369, are being utilized in limited applications where vibration and wear are of concern. There are also other heat treatable specialty alloysand processes available for structural applications, such as the Silafonts and AA365 (Aural 2), and high ductility, high strength alloys such as Mercalloy and K-Alloy.Contact your alloy producer for more information. More information can also be obtained from Microstructures and Properties of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys Book, NADCAPublication #215 and the High Integrity Aluminum Die Casting Book, NADCA Publication #307.3-6NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 2015

Alloy DataNADCAA-3-3-15GUIDELINESDie casting alloy selection requires evaluation not only of physical and mechanical properties,and chemical composition, but also of inherent alloy characteristics and their effect on diecasting production as well as possible machining and final surface finishing.This table includes selected die casting and other special characteristics which are usuallyconsidered in selecting an aluminum alloy for a specific application.The characteristics are rated from (1) to (5), (1) being the most desirable and (5) being theleast. In applying these ratings, it should be noted that all the alloys have sufficiently goodcharacteristics to be accepted by users and producers of die castings. A rating of (5) in one ormore categories would not rule out an alloy if other attributes are particularly favorable, butratings of (5) may present manufacturing difficulties.The benefits of consulting a custom die caster experienced in casting the aluminum alloy beingconsidered are clear.3Table A-3-3 Die Casting And Other Characteristics: Al Alloys(1 most desirable, 5 least desirable)Aluminum Die Casting Alloys360 A360 380 A380 383 384 390*13A1343218360.0 A360.0 380.0 A380.0 383.0 384.0 B390.0 413.0 A413.0 C443.0 518.0Commercial: ANSI/AAResistance toHot Cracking a11221241135Pressure TightnessDie-Filling Capacity b2222224113533221111145Anti-Soldering to the Die c22112221145Corrosion Resistance d22443532221Machining Ease & Quality e33332354453Polishing Ease & Quality f33333355541Electroplating Ease & Quality g22111233325Anodizing (Appearance) h33333455521Chemical Oxide Protective Coating i33444553321Strength at Elevated Temp. j11332233354a Ability of alloy to withstand stresses from contraction while cooling through hot-short or brittle temperature ranges. b Ability of molten alloy to flow readily in dieand fill thin sections. c Ability of molten alloy to flow without sticking to the die surfaces. Ratings given for anti-soldering are based on nominal iron compositions ofapproximately 1%. d Based on resistance of alloy in standard type salt spray test. e Composite rating based on ease of cutting, chip characteristics, quality of finish,and tool life. f Composite rating based on ease and speed of polishing and quality of finish provided by typical polishing procedure. g Ability of the die casting to takeand hold an electroplate applied by present standard methods. h Rated on lightness of color, brightness, and uniformity of clear anodized coating applied in sulphuricacid electrolyte. i Rated on combined resistance of coating and prolonged heating at testing temperature. Sources: ASTM B85-92a; ASM; SAE* Two other aluminum alloys, 361 & 369, are being utilized in limited applications where vibration and wear are of concern. There are also other heat treatablespecialty alloys available for structural applications, such as the Silafonts and AA365, and high ductility, high strength alloys such as Mercalloy and K-Alloy.Contact your alloy producer for more information.Note: Die castings are not usually solution heat treated. Low-temperature aging treatments may be used for stress relief or dimensional stability. A T2 or T5temper may be given to improve properties. Because of the severe chill rate and ultra-fine grain size in die castings, their “as-cast” structure approaches that of thesolution heat-treated condition. T4 and T5 temper results in properties quite similar to those which might be obtained if given a full T6 temper. Die castings arenot generally gas or arc welded or brazed.Additional A380 Alloy Tensile Data(Data is from separately cast specimines in the naturally aged condition)AlloysTensile ksi (MPa)Yield ksi (MPa)Elong %A380 with 0.26% Mg47.0 (201)26.6 (183)2.8A380 with 0.33% Mg 0.035% Sr*45.7 (177)28.5 (196)2.4A380 at 0.09% Mg45.5 (243)23.8 (135)2.6* Identified as AMC380* in research being conducted by WPI and funded by DoD/DLA. The values in this tableare the average mean values and are provided to indicate the effect of a higher magnesium content and additionalstrontium. The properties shown do not represent design minimums and should be used for reference only.NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 20153-7

Alloy DataTable 1: Composition of Three Experimental Alloys as Compared to A380.Composition (%)A380A380*AMC380AMC 1045SrSiCuMgFeMnZnNiTiSr7.5-9.53-4 0.1 1.3 0.5 3 2.0-3.0 0.1 0.2 –10.5-11.51.8-2.22.3-2.70.27-0.330.37-0.43 0.3 0.050.18-0.22 0.018-0.022 0.010.018-0.022Note: The experimental alloys were developed through research sponsored by NADCA, conducted at WPI, and funded by DOD/DLA.Table 2: T ensile properties of separately die cast specimens of the experimentalalloys compared to separately die cast specimens of alloy A380.AlloyA380A380*AMC 380*AMC 1045SrUTSYSGagelength(inch) Value (Ksi) Vs A380 (%) Value (Ksi) Vs A380 (%)1212121245.6 1.322.7 0.7–42.8 1.146.3 0.642.9 0.849.9 1.146.2 1.253.4 1.3 17.146.2 1.735.2 0.9 13.43.72 0.34-0.22.33 0.28-39.21.16 0.19 56.210.6 1.411.1 0.310.7 1.2-2.72.33 0.13 55.111.3 0.5 20.82.64 0.2Value(103 Ksi)11.0 1.1–4.63 0.38 19.838.0 0.8 8.12.33 0.24 22.929.1 0.6 7.9– 2.827.9 0.7 9.43.83 0.48 4.425.0 0.6 0.3Vs A380 (%)–23.7 0.5 1.4Modulus of ElasticityValue (%)–24.3 0.5–e-50.211.4 0.211.9 0.811.3 0.3Vs A380 (%)––-3.5-1.1-2.8 1.1 8.7 0.3Note: The experimental alloys were developed through research sponsored by NADCA, conducted at WPI, and funded by DOD/DLA. The properties shown do notrepresent design minimums and should be used for reference only.Table 3: T ensile properties measured on specimens that were cut from die cast components.AlloyA380AMC 380AMC 1045SrAMC 1045UTSYSeValue (Ksi) Vs A380 (%) Value (Ksi) Vs A380 (%)39.4 1.847.1 3.254.9 2.653.9 2.8– 19.6 39.4 36.821.4 1.731.0 1.442.2 4.645.7 2.4– 45.0 97.4 114Value (%)2.32 0.472.38 0.641.76 0.681.17 0.29Modulus of ElasticityVs A380 (%)– 2.7-24.3-49.5Value (103 Ksi)235.2 16.0302.6 28.4350.4 21.1339.8 19.2Vs A380 (%)– 28.6 49.0 44.4Note: The experimental alloys were developed through research sponsored by NADCA, conducted at WPI, and funded by DOD/DLA. The properties shown do notrepresent design minimums and should be used for reference only.3-8NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 2015

Alloy DataTable 4: Elevated temperature and room temperature tensile properties of theexperimental alloys and commercial A380 alloy. Tests were conductedat temperature on separately die cast tensile specimens.AlloyTest ConditionTS (Ksi)YS (Ksi)e (%)Modules ofElasticity(X10 3Ksi)25 C (as-cast)45.6 1.322.7 0.73.83 0.4811.0 1.10.5 h42.0 0.623.3 0.34.2 0.6310.2 0.5500 h42.7 0.625.4 0.44.17 0.69.5 0.41000 h43.4 0.326.5 0.24.20 0.19.8 0.50.5 h30.1 0.920.7 0.36.17 0.788.4 0.6500 h25.0 0.317.6 0.36.7 2.08.4 0.71000 h24.2 0.317.0 0.37.2 1.37.6 2.046.3 0.623.7 0.54.63 0.3810.6 1.40.5 h41.1 0.823.6 0.44.46 0.539.6 0.7500 h41.5 0.825.4 0.34.18 0.68.7 0.91000 h42.50.626.5 0.24.29 0.49.8 0.60.5 h30.1 0.623.1 0.45.01 0.148.4 0.6500 h25.6 0.419.2 0.65.8 1.09.2 0.61000 h24.4 0.218.2 0.26.3 0.68.2 1.649.9 1.127.9 0.73.72 0.3410.7 1.20.5 h46.6 1.028.1 0.54.20 0.229.7 0.3500 h46.5 0.730.3 0.43.70 0.29.8 0.41000 h46.9 0.632.2 0.83.21 0.29.9 0.40.5 h36.5 0.528.5 0.54.51 0.358.7 0.4500 h31.8 0.824.9 0.84.3 0.49.1 0.61000 h29.3 0.722.9 0.64.4 1.08.6 1.053.4 1.335.2 0.92.33 0.2811.9 0.80.5 h50.1 1.334.4 1.52.60 0.4310.1 0.2500 h50.2 2.737.0 0.62.27 0.69.8 0.41000 h50.4 1.139.0 0.91.89 0.310.0 0.40.5 h45.0 0.436.3 0.63.18 0.298.8 0.5500 h33.5 0.225.0 0.24.0 0.49.5 0.71000 h30.8 0.522.3 0.55.0 0.68.4 0.4100 CA380200 C25 C (as-cast)100 CA380*200 C25 C (as-cast)100 CAMC380200 C25 C (as-cast)100 CAMC1045Sr200 C3Note: The experimental alloys were developed through research sponsored by NADCA, conducted at WPI, and funded by DOD/DLA. The properties shown do not represent design minimums and should be used for reference only.NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 20153-9

Alloy DataTable 5: Tensile properties of the experimental alloys at temperature and afterexposure to temperature. Specimens were separately die cast.AlloyA380Test ConditionTS (Ksi)YS (Ksi)e (%)Modules ofElasticity(X10 3Ksi)25 C (as-cast)45.6 1.322.7 0.73.83 0.4811.0 1.10.5 h45.0 0.921.8 0.23.25 0.4711.8 1.2500 h38.4 0.722.2 1.92.91 0.7711.5 0.51000 h38.5 0.222.4 1.52.81 0.4912.4 1.70.5 h30.1 0.920.7 0.36.17 0.788.4 0.6500 h25.0 0.317.6 0.36.7 2.08.4 0.71000 h24.2 0.317.0 0.37.2 1.37.6 2.046.3 0.623.7 0.54.63 0.3810.6 1.40.5 h41.4 3.125.0 1.92.72 0.4211.2 1.6500 h39.0 0.222.7 0.43.34 0.509.1 0.81000 h37.3 0.121.3 0.23.13 0.1112.5 0.110.5 h30.1 0.623.1 0.45.01 0.148.4 0.6500 h25.6 0.419.2 0.65.8 1.09.2 0.61000 h24.4 0.218.2 0.26.3 0.68.2 1.649.9 1.127.9 0.73.72 0.3410.7 1.20.5 h48.0 0.727.6 0.53.13 0.2212.5 1.7500 h43.9 0.829.3 1.02.33 0.3611.6 2.01000 h45.1 1.429.5 0.82.68 0.3112.2 2.50.5 h36.5 0.528.5 0.54.51 0.358.7 0.4500 h31.8 0.824.9 0.84.3 0.49.1 0.61000 h29.3 0.722.9 0.64.4 1.08.6 1.053.4 1.335.2 0.92.33 0.2811.9 0.80.5 h49.5 3.536.0 3.31.42 0.3912.7 1.4500 h45.1 1.328.5 0.62.47 0.5212.2 1.71000 h44.1 1.225.7 0.73.13 0.0912.0 0.30.5 h45.0 0.436.3 0.63.18 0.298.8 0.5500 h33.5 0.225.0 0.24.0 0.49.5 0.71000 h30.8 0.522.3 0.55.0 0.68.4 0.4Cooledto25 CTestedat200 C25 C (as-cast)A380*Cooledto25 CTestedat200 C25 C (as-cast)AMC380Cooledto25 CTestedat200 C25 C (as-cast)AMC1045SrCooledto25 CTestedat200 CNote: The experimental alloys were developed through research sponsored by NADCA, conducted at WPI, and funded by DOD/DLA. The properties shown do not represent design minimums and should be used for reference only.3-10NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 2015

Alloy DataTable 6: Fatigue strength of experimental alloys as compare to A380. Specimens wereseparately die cast and tested using the R.R Moore rotating bending fatigue test.AlloyCyclesMaximumstress (ksi)Change vs.A380A380A380*AMC380AMC1045Sr1x10 85x10 81x10 85x10 81x10 85x10 81x10 85x10 % 3.34% 1.39% 8.33% 8.98%Note: The experimental alloys were developed through research sponsored by NADCA, conducted at WPI, and funded by DOD/DLA. The properties shown do not represent design minimums and should be used for reference only.3Table 7: Composition of suggested alloys and company specific alloys as compared to A380A380Si7.5-9.5CuMgFeHigh Mg A3807.5-9.53-40.53-40.1Composition .25Gibbsalloy 5Table 8: Tensile properties of separately die cast specimens of the suggested and companyspecific alloys compared to separately die cast specimens of alloy A380.UTS (ksi)YS (ksi)e (%)Hi Mg 38045.827.23.0Hi Mg 0AlloyB360-T547.023.03.55237.13.6Gibbsalloy MN30.615.912.1Gibbsalloy MN-T532.518.511.7Note: This data was developed through research sponsored by NADCA and funded by DOD/DLA and NADCA. Theproperties shown do not represent design minimums and should be used for reference only.NADCA Product Specification Standards for Die Castings / 20153-11

Alloy Data3Aluminum Metal Matrix CompositesSelecting Aluminum CompositesAluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) are aluminum-based alloys reinforced with up to 20%silicon carbide (SiC) particles, which are now being used for high-performance die cast components.The mechanical properties of ASTM test specimens made from these materials typically exceedthose of most aluminum, magnesium, zinc and bronze components produced by die casting, andmatch or approach many of the characteristics of iron castings and steel at lighter weight.The expected properties of MMC parts are higher stiffness and thermal conductivity,improved wear resistance, lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and higher tensile and fatiguestrengths at elevated temperature, with densities within 5% of aluminum die casting alloys.These composites can also yield castings with reduced porosity.Preliminary data also indicates that less vibrational noise is generated by parts made from thesecomposites, under certain conditions, than by identical parts made from unreinforced aluminum.Duralcan F3D.10%v/v and 20%v/v aluminum metal matrix composites reinforced with SiCceramic powder are general purpose die casting alloys.Duralcan F3N.10%v/v and 20%v/v aluminum metal matrix composites reinforced with SiCceramic powder contain virtually no copper or nickel and are designed for use in corrosionsensitive applications. All of these composites are heat treatable.Machining CharacteristicsAl-MMCs are significantly more abrasive to cutting tools than all other aluminum die cast andgravity cast alloys, except for hypereutectic Al-Si alloys (those containing primary Si phases).Coarse grades of polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tools are recommended for anything morethan prototype quantities of machining.With the proper tooling, A

ASTM B85 Former SAE J452 Federal QQ-A-591 b DIN g 1725 JIS H 5302 360 A03600 360.0 SG100B — b A360 a A13600 A360.0 SG100A 309 b 233 ADC3 380 c A03800 380.0 SC84B 308 b A380 a c A13800 A380.0 SC84A 306 B 226A e ADC10 CD 383 A03830 383.0 SC102A 383 b 226A e ADC12 CD 384 A03840 384.0 SC114A 303 b ADC12 CD A384 a —A384.0 b ADC12

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