Paper 2 Writers’ Viewpoints And Perspectives Mark Scheme

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SPECIMEN MATERIAL 2GCSEEnglish LanguagePaper 2 Writers’ viewpoints and perspectivesMark Scheme8700Version 2.0

2MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2Mark schemes are prepared by the Lead Assessment Writer.It must be stressed that a mark scheme is a working document, in many cases furtherdeveloped and expanded on the basis of students’ reactions to a particular paper. Assumptionsabout future mark schemes on the basis of one year’s document should be avoided; whilst theguiding principles of assessment remain constant, details will change, depending on the contentof a particular examination paper.Copyright 2015 AQA and its licensors. All rights reserved.AQA retains the copyright on all its publications. However, registered schools/colleges for AQA are permitted to copy material fromthis booklet for their own internal use, with the following important exception: AQA cannot give permission to schools/colleges tophotocopy any material that is acknowledged to a third party even for internal use within the centre.

3MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2Marking methodsIn fairness to students, all teachers must use the same marking methods. The following advicemay seem obvious, but all teachers must follow it as closely as possible.1.2.3.4.Refer constantly to the mark scheme throughout marking.Always credit accurate, relevant and appropriate answers which are not given in themark scheme.Use the full range of marks. Don’t hesitate to give full marks when the answer meritsthem.The key to good and fair marking is consistency. Do not change your standard ofmarking.

4MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2INTRODUCTIONThe information provided for each question is intended to be a guide to the kind of answersanticipated and is neither exhaustive nor prescriptive. All appropriate responses should begiven credit.Where literary or linguistic terms appear in the Mark Scheme, they do so generally for the sakeof brevity. Knowledge of such terms, other than those given in the specification, is not required.However, when determining the level of response for a particular answer, examiners shouldtake into account any instances where the student uses these terms effectively to aid the clarityand precision of the argument.Level of response marking instructionsLevel of response mark schemes are broken down into four levels. There are two, three, four,five or six marks in each level; dependent upon question.Please note: The sample responses in each Indicative Standard/Content Descriptorcolumn are not intended to be complete, full or model answers. Instead, they are thereas a guide, to provide you with part of an answer, an indicative extract of a response atthe required level. If a student was to continue to develop a response at that standard,they would gain a mark at that level.Step 1 Determine a levelStart at the lowest level of the mark scheme and use it as a ladder to see whether the answermeets the descriptor for that level. The descriptor for the level indicates the different qualitiesthat might be seen in the student’s answer for that level. If it meets the lowest level then go tothe next one and decide if it meets this level, and so on, until you have a match between thelevel descriptor and the answer. With practice and familiarity you will find that for betteranswers you will be able to quickly skip through the lower levels of the mark scheme.Step 2 Determine a markOnce you have assigned a level you need to decide on the mark. You may well need to readback through the answer as you apply the mark scheme to clarify points and assure yourselfthat the level and the mark are appropriate.The Skills Descriptors column indicates the different skills that students need to demonstrate intheir answer for that level. To achieve full marks in a level, students should meet all of the skillsdescriptors in that level. Students achieving marks at the bottom of a level will ideally have metall skills descriptors of the previous level and at least one of the skills descriptors in that level.An answer which contains nothing of relevance to the question must be awarded no marks.

5MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2SECTION A: READING – Assessment ObjectivesAO1 Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. Select and synthesise evidence from different texts.AO2 Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structureto achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subjectterminology to support their views.AO3 Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these areconveyed, across two or more texts.AO4 Evaluate texts critically and support this with appropriate textualreferences.SECTION B: WRITING – Assessment ObjectivesAO5AO6 Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adaptingtone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences. Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical featuresto support coherence and cohesion of texts. Candidates must use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures forclarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. (Thisrequirement must constitute 20% of the marks for each specification as awhole).

6AssessmentObjectiveMARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2Section AAO1 AO2 AO3 AO4n/aSection BAO5 AO6

7MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2Section A: Reading0 1Read again the first part of source A, lines 1 to 14.Choose four statements below which are TRUE. ABCDEFGHShade the boxes of the ones that you think are trueChoose a maximum of four statements.Anton is standing in water, covered in mud.Anton is being carried away by the current.Glastonbury is a scene of near-total devastation.The moorings of the tents are floating down the hillside.The writer is shivering and caught in a thunderstorm.Half-naked people are running after their tents.At first, the writer was not pleased to be sent to Glastonbury.The writer was not surprised to find it was wet and muddy.[4 marks]AO1 Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. Select and synthesise evidence from different texts.This assesses the first bullet point: identify and interpret explicit and implicitinformation and ideas.ABCDEFGHAnton is standing in water, covered in mud. (T)Anton is being carried away by the current. (F)Glastonbury is a scene of near-total devastation. (T)The moorings of the tents are floating down the hillside. (F)The writer is shivering and caught in a thunderstorm. (F)Half-naked people are running after their tents. (T)At first, the writer was not pleased to be sent to Glastonbury. (T)The writer was not surprised to find it was wet and muddy. (F)

80 2MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2You need to refer to source A and source B for this question:The things to see and do at Glastonbury Festival and Greenwich Fair aredifferent.Use details from both sources to write a summary of the differences.[8 marks]AO1 Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas Select and synthesise evidence from different textsThis assesses both bullet points.LevelLevel 4Perceptive,summary7-8 marksLevel 3Clear,relevantSkills DescriptorsShows perceptive synthesisand interpretation of both texts: Makes perceptiveinferences from both texts Makes judiciousreferences/use of textualdetail relevant to the focusof the question Statements showperceptive differencesbetween textsShows clear synthesis andinterpretation of both texts: Makes clear inferencesfrom both textsHow to arrive ata markAt the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theskills descriptors.Indicative StandardThis indicative standard is nota model answer, or acomplete response. Nor doesit seek to exemplify anyparticular content. Rather, itis an indication of thestandard for the level.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveLevel 3 and atleast one of theskills descriptors.There are similar things tosee and do at the two placesbut they happen in verydifferent ways; music is anexample. There are bands atGreenwich, each with threedrums, all play ‘differenttunes at the same time’ so itsounds like disorganisedchaos and just a cacophonyadding to the confusion. AtGlastonbury, we get adifferent idea of the bands:including Elvis Costello andThe Killers, who ‘perform intuxedo jackets and glitter’, sothis seems like it is moreorganised, with spectatorsactually watching. Thiscreates a more refinedatmosphere than atGreenwich. Also, couples canget married at the chapel oflove and loathing.At the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theThe main thing to see andhear at Glastonbury is themusic, with a list of the topbands playing including the

9summary 5-6 marks Level 2Some,attempts atsummary3-4 marksLevel 1Simple,limitedsummary1-2 marksLevel 0No marksSelects clearreferences/textual detailrelevant to the focus of thequestionStatements show cleardifferences between textsMARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2skills descriptors.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveLevel 2 and atleast one of theskills descriptors.Shows some interpretationfrom one/both texts: Attempts some inference(s)from one/both texts Selects some appropriatereferences/textual detailfrom one/both texts Statements show somedifference(s) between textsAt the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theskills descriptors.Shows simple awareness fromone/both texts: Offers paraphrase ratherthan inference Makes simplereference/textual detailsfrom one/both texts Statement(s) show a simpledifference between textsAt the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theskills descriptors.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveLevel 1 and atleast one of theskills descriptors.rock band, The Killers andColdplay. At Greenwich Fairthere are also bands playing,but a main attraction is thestalls selling toys and food,such as the stall selling ‘realspice nuts’ with ‘un-bonnetedyoung ladies’ whose job is tolure you there to buy some.At Greenwich Fair there arelots of stalls, ‘gaily lighted up’selling toys and things to eat,whereas there are lots ofwell-known bands playing atGlastonbury, suggesting thatit is more about music.Glastonbury has bands likeColdplay and Elvis Costelloto see. The Greenwich Fairhas lots of stalls selling thingslike gingerbread and toys.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveat least one of theskills descriptors.Students in this band will not have offered any differencesNothing to rewardAO1 Content may include ideas such as: the different types of musical things / bands to be seen at each event the various stalls and Richardson’s booth at Greenwich and what can be seen and donethere compared with the various areas, e.g. Lost Vagueness and Chapel of Love and Loathing disc-jockeybooth at Glastonbury.

100 3MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2You now need to refer only to source B, Dickens’ description of the fair itself,(line 19 to the end).How does Dickens use language to make you, the reader, feel part of the fair?[12 marks]AO2Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects andinfluence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their viewsThis question assesses Language ie: Words / Phrases / Language Features / LanguageTechniques / Sentence FormsLevelLevel 4Detailed,perceptiveanalysis10-12 marksSkills DescriptorsShows detailed andperceptiveunderstanding oflanguage: Analyses the effectsof the writer’schoices of language Selects a judiciousrange of textualdetail Makessophisticated andaccurate use ofsubject terminologyHow to arrive ata markIndicative StandardAt the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theskills descriptors.The second person direct addresswith the instruction to ‘imagineyourself’ draws the modern readerinto the excitement of the past.Also the description of“Richardson’s” is seductive for thereader: the phrase ‘brightlyilluminated lamps’ and ‘immensebooth’ suggest a promise – ofdrama and expectation – aboutwhat could be inside thatcavernous place. The image of‘pots of burning fat’ has a bizarrebut authentic effect on the sensesof both smell and sight –melodramatic and intriguing of itselffor the modern reader, sinceburning fat has connotations ofdanger and error rather thanentertainment.The authentic direct speech of theman, which enhances his‘countryman’s’ dress, is engagingfor the reader, who is also thenenticed to ‘come for’erd’. Theadjective, ‘tragic’ and the noun,‘swell’, attached to theprofessionals who ‘foot it toperfection’, suggest that theirperformance is beautifully contrivedboth on and off the stage.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveLevel 3 and atleast one of theskills descriptors.This indicative standard is not amodel answer, or a completeresponse. Nor does it seek toexemplify any particular content.Rather, it is an indication of thestandard for the level.

11Level 3Clear, relevantexplanation7-9 marksLevel 2Some,understandingand comment4-6 marksLevel 1Simple, limitedcomment1-3 marksLevel 0No marksMARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2Shows clearunderstanding oflanguage: Explains clearly theeffects of thewriter’s choices oflanguage Selects a range ofrelevant textualdetail Makes clear andaccurate use ofsubject terminologyAt the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theskills descriptors.Shows someunderstanding oflanguage: Attempts tocomment on theeffect of language Selects someappropriate textualdetail Makes some use ofsubject terminology,mainly appropriatelyAt the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theskills descriptors.The writer uses a list of descriptivenouns: ‘the screams of the women,the shouts of the boys, the clangingof gongs ’ to build up the idea ofnoise and excitement for thereader.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveLevel 1 and atleast one of theskills descriptors.It says, ‘you are in the very centreand heart of the fair’ which has theeffect of making the reader feelthey were in the middle of it.Shows simpleawareness of language: Offers simplecomment on theeffects of language Selects simplereferences ortextual details Makes simple useof subjectterminology, notalwaysappropriatelyAt the top of thelevel, a student’sresponse willmeet all of theskills descriptors.It says the stalls were ‘gaily lightedup’ which makes you think theywere bright.The writer uses a list to show thatthere were lots of things to see andbuy, so making you feel that youwere there.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveLevel 2 and atleast one of theskills descriptors.At the bottom ofthe level, astudent will haveat least one of theskills descriptors.No comments offered on the use of languageNothing to rewardDickens’ use of the pronoun ‘you’in ‘Five minutes walking brings youto the fair’ has the effect of puttingthe reader firmly in the action andevents, and the time reference of‘Five minutes’ hurries the readeralong quickly to the ‘fair itself’. Thedescription of the stalls as ‘gailylighted up’ gives the sense of abright, colourful and seductivescene which is also suggested bythe word ‘attractive’ in the phrase‘the most attractive goods’. Thealliteration in ‘pennyworths ofpickled salmon’ helps it seemmouth-watering, whereas the word‘bilious’ in ‘species of snail floatingin a somewhat bilious-lookinggreen liquid’ is revolting and alsomakes the reader feel sick.

12MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2AO2 Content may include the effect of ideas such as: Dickens’ use of descriptive words and phrases, imagery and extended vocabulary Dickens’ use of linguistic features and devices such as lists and alliteration Dickens’ evocation of atmosphere and character the extent to which the reader feels affected, involved, engaged with the text.

130 4MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2For this question, you need to refer to the whole of source A together with thewhole of source B.Compare how the writers have conveyed their different views and experiencesof the festival and fair they describe.In your answer, you could: compare their different views and experiencescompare the methods they use to convey those views and experiencessupport your ideas with references to both texts.[16 marks]AO3Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or moretextsLevelLevel 4Perceptive,detailed13-16 marksSkills Descriptors Compares ideasand perspectivesin a perceptivewayAnalyses howwriters’ methodsare usedSelects a range ofjudicioussupporting detailfrom both textsShows a detailedunderstanding ofthe different ideasand perspectivesin both textsHow to arrive at amarkIndicative StandardAt the top of the level,a student’s responsewill meet all of theskills descriptors.The journeys to the events havebeen presented from verydifferent perspectives. Dickensdescribes a ‘state of perpetualbustle and noise’, and vehicles‘crammed with people atutmost speed’ making thejourney seem risky, perhapsdangerous, even lethal, butdoes so employing an extendedlist of lively sights and sounds,whereas Elizabeth Day, whosegeneral tone is one of wryhumour, describes her trainjourney to Castle Cary as theheight of civilised calm,sophistication and quiet, withstudents ‘sipping Pimms andmaking polite chit-chat’.This indicative standard is not amodel answer, or a completeresponse. Nor does it seek toexemplify any particular content.Rather, it is an indication of thestandard for the level.This difference is connected toother events: The ‘extremelydense crowd’ would be commonto both, but Dickens describesan invitation to the reader to be

14MARK SCHEME – GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE – PAPER 2At the bottom of thelevel, a student willhave Level 3 and atleast one of the skillsdescriptors.Level 3Clear,relevant9-12 marks Compares ideasand perspectivesin a clear andrelevant wayExplains clearlyhow writers’methods are usedSelects relevantdetail to supportfrom both textsShows a clearunderstanding ofthe different ideasand perspectivesin both textsAt the top of the level,a student’s responsewill meet all of theskills descriptors.At the bottom of thelevel, a student willhave Level 2 and atleast one of the skillsdescriptors.Level 2 Some,attempts 5-8 marks Attempts tocompare ideas andperspectivesMakes somecomment on howwriters’ methodsare usedSelects someappropriatetextualdetail/references,not alwayssupporting fromone or both textsIdentifies someAt the top of the level,a student’s responsewill meet all of theskills descriptors.At the bottom of thelevel, a student willhave Level 1 and atleast one of the skillsdescriptors.swung chaotically ‘to and fro,and in and out’. Elizabeth Daypresents a different, civilisedand controlled, 21st centuryversion: ‘It’s a very safe, familyfriendly atmosphere’ says EdThaw, and ‘the crowd remainedgood-humoured throughout.’She cites peoples’ thoughts toreinforce her changingperspective. This perspective is,in contrast to the 19th century,‘ almost nice’.From Elizabeth Day’sperspective, the idea of going toGlastonbury was one of‘undiluted horror’, and her use ofwords like ‘horror’, ‘devastation’and ‘terrible natural disaster’ todescribe the scene reinforce thisinitial view. However, thischanges as she realises that theexperience is not as bad as shefeared and language choicesvary accordingly to describingGlastonbury as ‘almost civilised’and, at the end, ‘almost nice’.Dickens, on the other hand ispositive, enthusiastic, and joyfulabout the Fair all the waythrough. Although he describesladies ‘screaming’, completechaos and a dangerous crowd‘swinging you to and fro’, thetone is always one of joy andcelebration and actually positive.Elizabeth Day thoughtGlastonbury was a nightmarewhen she got there because shedescribes the place as ‘a sceneof near devastation’ and that thepeople ‘look like survivors of aterrible disaster’.On the other han

8 MARK SCHEME –GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE PAPER 2 You need to refer to source A and source B for this question: The things to see and do at Glastonbury Festival and Greenwich Fair are different. Use details from both sources to write a summary of the differences. [8 marks] AO1 Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas

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