OUTBACK ALLIED HEALTH “REALISING POTENTIAL AND

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OUTBACK ALLIED HEALTH“REALISING POTENTIAL ANDINSPIRING CHANGE”Inaugural Allied Health ForumThursday 8th June 2017Mount Isa, QueenslandProgram of EventsandPresentation Abstracts

Table of ContentsTABLE OF CONTENTS . IIPUBLISHING INFORMATION. 1SPONSORS . 2ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS . 3FORUM WELCOME . 4KEYNOTE SPEAKERS . 5FORUM SCHEDULE . 6PEER REVIEW AND AVAILABILITY OF PROCEEDINGS . 9WHO’S DOING WHAT AFTER THE WET? . 10FORUM ABSTRACTS (IN ORDER OF PRESENTATION) . 11LIGHTNING ROUND 1 . 11SPEAKER 1: SAMANTHA TATE; . 11Caring for an amputee post-surgery and the challenges faced when discharged into a remotecommunity hospital . 11SPEAKER 2: LOUISE TERRY; . 11Rural Generalists and Therapy Specialists; Promoting skill sharing and delegation throughtelehealth across the remote North West . 11SPEAKER 3: SARAH HUGHES;. 11To be confirmed. 11LIGHTNING ROUND 2: . 11SPEAKER: GRACE TANNER; . 11Indigenous Nutrition Services Project: A multi-disciplinary approach to Type 2 Diabetes groupeducation sessions. 11ABSTRACT PRESENTATIONS. 12ABSTRACT 1: SUSAN ELLIOTT/ILSA NIELSEN; .12Grasping opportunities and realising benefits of Rural Generalist Training Positions; the NorthWest experience .12ABSTRACT 2: CATRINA FELTON-BUSCH/KYLIE STOTHERS/SHAUN SOLOMON; . 13Collaboration of Indigenous Allied Health . 13

ABSTRACT 3: SARAH JACKSON;.14An update on rural and remote stroke survivors’ perspective on their recovery journey in NorthWest Queensland .14ABSTRACT 4: MARTINA TAYLOR; . 15It’s just the beginning; Development of student-led Allied Health Services in the Lower Gulf . 15ABSTRACT 5: DEB PHILLIPS; .16Occupational Therapy led paediatric telehealth review clinic – keeping kids closer to home .16ABSTRACT 6: NATASHA HART/JAYNE HENSHALL; . 171800SPEECH – Sorry your call cannot be connected. Please check your bandwidth and tryagain . 17ABSTRACT 7: SARAH PIZZEY;.18Rural Generalist Training: Service development project in HHS dual funded Physiotherapyposition.18ABSTRACT 8: BONNIE COLLINS; .19Expansion of Physiotherapy serviced in ED and fracture clinic at Mount Isa Hospital .19ABSTRACT 9: LYNETTE STENHOUSE AND REBECCA LISTER; . 20From safety boots to safety minds – creating a mentally healthy work place. . 20POSTERS . 211. GRACE TANNER (DIETITIAN – NORTH AND WEST REMOTE HEALTH); .21Indigenous nutrition services project; A multi-disciplinary approach to Type 2 Diabetes groupeducation sessions.212. COURTNEY HOFFMAN (DIETITIAN – NORTH WEST HOSPITAL & HEALTH SERVICE); .21Harnessing the potential of rural telehealth in dietetics. .213. SELINA TAYLOR (PHARMACIST – MOUNT ISA CENTRE FOR RURAL AND REMOTE HEALTH, JAMESCOOK UNIVERSITY); .21Rural Pharmacy – Endless opportunities in the bush. .214. SHANNON MORLEY (SENIOR DIETITIAN – NORTH WEST HOSPITAL & HEALTH SERVICE) & EMILYMISSENDEN (SENIOR SPEECH PATHOLOGIST – NORTH WEST HOSPITAL & HEALTH SERVICE); .21Food for thought – moulded modified meals improving patient nutritional outcomes andsatisfaction. .21NOTES PAGE. 22

Publishing InformationInaugural Outback Allied Health – “Realising potential and inspiring change”Formal Title of the Proceedings: Outback Allied Health – “Realising potential and inspiringchange”Editor (s): Melinda DuncanForum Date: Thursday 8th June 2017Forum Location: Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health, James Cook University,Mount Isa Hospital Campus, Joan Street entrance, Mount Isa, QLD 4825Forum Email Address: NWQAHforum@jcu.edu.auPublisher: Outback Allied Health Forum committee 2017Year of Publication: 2017Volume: 1Note to Presentation Authors who submit to this forum and agree to the following term:1. Authors retain copyright over their work, while allowing the forum to place thisunpublished work under a Creative Commons Attribute License, which allows others tofreely access, use, and share the work, with an acknowledgement of the work’sauthorship and its initial presentation at this forum.2. Authors are able to waive the terms of the Creative Commons license and enter intoseparate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution andsubsequent publication of this work (e.g. publish a revised version in a journal, post it toan institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initialpresentation at this forum.3. In addition, authors are encouraged to post and share their work online (e.g. ininstitutional repositories or on their website) at any point before and after the forum.1

SponsorsThe Outback Allied Health Forum committee acknowledges the contributions and supportfrom the following organisations’ listed below in making this forum possible. North West Hospital and Health Service (NWHHS) Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health, James Cook University (MICRRH, JCU) Western Queensland Primary Health Network (WQPHN) Australian Council of Deans of Health Sciences (ACDHS) Allied Health Professions Office of Queensland Gidgee Healing North and West Remote Health (NWRH) Education Queensland2

AcknowledgementsThe inaugural Outback Allied Health – “Realising Potential and Inspiring Change” forumcommittee members would like to acknowledge the contributions of all key stakeholders thathave forged strong partnerships in the process of raising the profile of the dedicated NorthQueensland Allied Health Professionals.The collaborative response by the Allied Health clinicians to the call for abstracts, sponsorshipand participation has been remarkable. It has afforded the many inspiring health professionalsof North Queensland the unique opportunity to present their exciting work within their owncommunity, for their communities.A special acknowledgement for the incredible support the clinicians have received must bemade to Andrea Leigh, Professor Sabina Knight and Robyn Adams for their leadership, clinicalexpertise and encouragement in bringing the forum together.The forum committee comprises of a collaborative of organisations working together underthe leadership by Andrea Leigh, Professor Sabina Knight and Robyn Adams and wouldparticularly like to acknowledge:Forum Committee: Andrea Leigh, Professor Sabina Knight, Robyn Adams, Melinda Duncan,Rahni Cotterill, Louise Massie, Sarah Jackson and Alexander LauerAbstract Committee Oversight: Professor Sabina Knight and Robyn AdamsAbstract Committee: Melinda Duncan, Louise Massie, Alexander Lauer and Rahni CotterillInformation Technology: Amanda Kaminski and Sanjay NarayanForum Registration and Website: Amanda Kaminski and Catherine HaysForum Administration: Rachel Moore and Amanda KaminskiVenue Development: Professor Sabina Knight, Louise Massie and Melinda Duncan3

Forum WelcomeWelcome to the inaugural Outback Allied Health Forum “Realising Potential and InspiringChange”.The Outback Allied Health Forum was an initiative of the NWHHS Allied Health team under theleadership of Andrea Leigh, former Director of Allied Health, North West Hospital and HealthService. The forum presents the collaborative innovations of the many Allied HealthProfessionals within outback North Queensland.The forum focuses on the themes of realising potential and inspiring change by examining thevast and unique delivery of health services within rural and remote areas. The impetus for thecollaboration came from the many health professionals working with rural and remotecommunities who are overcoming the many challenges of developing and implementing clientcentered and evidence based care.The conference comprises of abstract presentations and posters. It aims to raise the profile ofAllied Health Professionals within an ever expanding health care system and bring to theforefront the significant contributions allied health professionals make to patient care.4

Keynote SpeakersLisa Davies Jones – Chief Executive, North West Hospital and Health ServiceJulie Hulcombe – Chief Allied Health Officer, Allied Health Professions Office of Queensland,Department of HealthIlsa Nielson – Principle Workforce Officer, Allied Health Professions Office of Queensland,Department of HealthRobyn Adams – Executive Officer, Australian Council of Deans of Health Services (ACDHS),Division of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook UniversityAndrea Leigh – Director of Regional Allied Health – Gidgee Healing; Former - Director of AlliedHealth, North West Hospital and Health ServiceProfessor Sabina Knight – Director, Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health (MICRRH),James Cook University (JCU)Dallas Leon – Chief Executive Officer, Gidgee HealingDominic Sandilands – Executive Manager Primary Healthcare and Human Resources, NorthWest Remote Health. Commencing with North and West Remote Health 2011, DominicSandilands has 15 years’ experience in tertiary and regional hospitals; remote primary andcommunity healthcare centres and 9 years’ experience as a health service manager. With aclinical background in Podiatry, Dominic is passionate about fostering leadership pathways inregional, rural and remote areas and in 2015 was elected as a member of the QueenslandBranch Council for the Australasian College of Health Service Managers and Secretary since2016; Dominic is a Fellow of the ACHSM; an MBA Graduate and a Graduate with the AustralianInstitute of Company Directors.Alexander Lauer – Physiotherapist, Department of Education and Training Queensland.Working in the Mount Isa area for the past 7 years. Working across local and outreach schoolsettings has fostered his passion for seeing good transitions between primary health and thecommunity setting. This has included work supporting new graduate staff, new servicedeliveries (e.g. telehealth) and working closely with families returning to community. Alex alsohas interests in hydrotherapy and mobility equipment.5

Forum ScheduleTime10:30 amChair30 minsRegistrationZonta will be available at MICRRH to purchase coffee11:00 amAndreaLeighWelcome to Country – Aunty Karen West10 mins11:10 am15 minsOpening Address – Lisa Davies JonesChief Executive Officer, North West Hospital and HealthService11:25 am30 minsAllied Health – Julie HulcombeChief Allied Health Officer, Allied Health Professions’Office of Queensland, Department of Health11:55 amWho’s Doing What After the Wet? – Innovative Modelsof Care5 minsNWHHS – Kathryn Fulton5 minsMICRRH – Professor Sabina Knight5 minsNWRH – Dominic Sandilands5 minsDepartment of Education and Training Queensland –Alexander Lauer20 minsGidgee Healing – Dallas Leon5 minsQuestions & comments12:50 pm40 mins1:30 pmJulieHulcombe5 minsBreak – LunchLightning Round 1:Samantha Tate; Caring for an amputee post-surgery andthe challenges faced when discharged into a remotecommunity hospital6

5 minsLouise Terry; Rural Generalists and Therapy Specialists;Promoting skill sharing and delegation through telehealthacross the remote North West5 minsSarah Hughes; to be confirmedGroup Questions; Telehealth Initiatives1:45 pm15 minsLightning Round 2:Grace Tanner; Indigenous Nutrition Services Project: Amulti-disciplinary approach to Type 2 Diabetes groupeducation sessions2:00 pm5 minsRobyn Adams; SARRAH promotion5 minsKylie Stothers; IAHA promotion5 minsRhonda Fleming; PHN promotion2:15 pm15 minsSusan Elliott/Ilsa Nielsen; Grasping opportunities andrealising benefits of Rural Generalist Training Positions;the North West experience2:30 pm10 minsCatrina Felton-Busch/Kylie Stothers/Shaun Solomon;Collaboration of Indigenous Allied Health2:40 pm10 minsSarah Jackson; An update on rural and remote strokesurvivors’ perspective on their recovery journey in NorthWest Queensland2:50 pm10 minsMartina Taylor; It’s just the beginning; Development ofstudent-led Allied Health Services in the Lower Gulf3:00 pm30 mins3:30 pmIlsa Nielson Deb Phillips; Occupational Therapy led paediatrictelehealth review clinic – keeping kids closer to home15 mins3:45 pm15 minsBreak – Afternoon TeaNatasha Hart/Jayne Henshall; 1800SPEECH – Sorryyour call cannot be connected. Please check yourbandwidth and try again7

4:00 pm7.5 minsSarah Pizzey; Rural Generalist Training: Servicedevelopment project in HHS dual funded Physiotherapyposition7.5 minsBonnie Collins; Expansion of Physiotherapy serviced inED and fracture clinic at Mount Isa Hospital4:15 pm15 minsLynette Stenhouse and Rebecca Lister; From safetyboots to safety minds – creating a mentally healthy workplace4:30 pm15 mins4:45 pmChristineMann45 mins5:30 pmProfessorSabinaKnight10 minsBreakKeynote Presentation; Robyn AdamsExecutive Officer, Australian Council of Deans of HealthSciences (ACDHS). Division of Tropical Health andMedicine, James Cook UniversityForum Wrap Up and Summary; Professor SabinaKnightDirector, Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health,James Cook University5:30 pm5:30 pm – 2 hrs7:30 pmClosure of ForumNetworking Mixer and Poster Stalls8

Peer Review and Availability of ProceedingsAll abstracts were reviewed by the forum abstract committee and overseen by academicsProfessor Sabina Knight and Robyn Adams.The process the abstract committee undertook to review the submission involved thefollowing steps:1) The committee was selected from clinicians already participating in the forum.2) Each submission was reviewed individually by all members of the abstract committee.Acceptance was based on the demonstration of innovative care provision and relevanceto the forum theme.3) Following acceptance at committee level, all acceptance recommendations went forfinal approved by Professor Sabina Knight and Robyn Adams.4) In cases were submissions did not meet the criteria for a presentation, a posterpresentation was offered as an alternative.9

Who’s Doing What After the Wet? Andrea Leigh – Director of Regional Allied Health – Gidgee Healing; Former Director ofAllied Health, North West Hospital and Health Service Professor Sabina Knight – Director, Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health,James Cook University Dallas Leon – Chief Executive Officer, Gidgee Healing Dominic Sandilands – Executive Manager Primary Healthcare and Human Resources,North and West Remote Health Alexander Lauer – Physiotherapist, Department of Education and Training Queensland10

Forum Abstracts (in order of presentation)Lightning Round 1Speaker 1: Samantha Tate;Caring for an amputee post-surgery and the challenges faced when discharged into aremote community hospitalSpeaker 2: Louise Terry;Rural Generalists and Therapy Specialists; Promoting skill sharing and delegationthrough telehealth across the remote North WestSpeaker 3: Sarah Hughes;To be confirmedLightning Round 2:Speaker: Grace Tanner;Indigenous Nutrition Services Project: A multi-disciplinary approach to Type 2 Diabetesgroup education sessions11

Abstract PresentationsAbstract 1: Susan Elliott/Ilsa Nielsen;Grasping opportunities and realising benefits of Rural Generalist Training Positions; theNorth West experienceBACKGROUND: Recruitment and retention of Allied Health Professionals in someprofessional streams at North West Hospital and Health Service (NWHHS) has historicallybeen challenging. Motivated by the goal of supporting an “own grown” workforce toaddress this trend, the NWHHS has successfully secured non-recurrent funding andimplemented a supernumerary Allied Health Rural Generalist Training Position (AHRGTP)since 2014.AIMS: NWHHS aimed to use the AHRGTP initiative to increase recruitment and workforcesustainability and to enhance allied health service access and outcomes.METHODS: NWHHS received funding for one position from 2014-16, implementingsequential twelve-month roles in dietetics, speech pathology and occupational therapy.Host work units implemented structured and guided learning and development activitiesfor the position holder and developed, implemented and evaluated a service developmentproject.RESULTS: Position incumbents have reported positive experiences of supported learningand project opportunities. The initiative has enabled NWHHS to develop and implementnew models that improve service access for the community. Outcomes include newspeech pathology telehealth services to Cloncurry, a full review of Mt Isa Hospital foodservice, and an occupational therapy outpatient paediatric assessment clinic.CONCLUSIONS: These positions have provided the means for service model reviews andchange at NWHHS Allied Health, while developing the generalist skills of early careerprofessionals. There is the potential to consider: skill sharing models; reviewing skill mix inrural and remote generalist positions; and better using assistants. The successfulimplementation through 2014-16 resulted in an additional two years AHPOQ funding for aphysiotherapy position and the redesign of an existing NWHHS role to a rural generalisttraining position. These roles will join early career practitioners from four other states incompleting the James Cook University Rural Generalist Program, the first formal ruralgeneralist education program offered in Australia.12

Abstract 2: Catrina Felton-Busch/Kylie Stothers/Shaun Solomon;Collaboration of Indigenous Allied HealthBACKGROUND: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals play a vital role inaddressing the health needs of our people. To close the gap in Indigenous health outcomes,we need more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider becoming allied healthprofessionals and to also increase the opportunities for those living in remote Australia tohave access to allied health professionals.AIMS: Increase the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce in remote andregional QLD and Northern Australia to improve the health and well-being of Aboriginal andTorres Strait Islander people.METHODS: Collaboration Agreement between Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) andMount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health, James Cook University (MICRRH).RESULTS: Intended results include: Improved student placement opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres StraitIslander allied health students to experience a remote or rural placement inQLD and/or Northern Australia. Increased cultural responsiveness of all staff involved in student placementactivities Increased learning opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanderallied health students that involve local based learning and multidisciplinarylearning opportunities Increased awareness around the role and need for allied health workforce inremote and rural Australia13

Abstract 3: Sarah Jackson;An update on rural and remote stroke survivors’ perspective on their recovery journey inNorth West QueenslandBACKGROUND: One-third of Australian stroke survivors (131,100 approximately) continue tolive their lives with disability. Rural and remote Australians are more likely to be hospitalisedfor stroke than their urban counterparts yet have access to a proportionally smaller healthworkforce and infrastructure. Northwest Queensland (NWQ) represents a culturally diversepopulation spread across a large area classified as rural and remote. For NWQ stroke survivorsinpatient rehabilitation may not be part of their story for a variety of reasons. Technology hasbeen identified as a possible mode to promote access, yet there has been limitedinvestigation into its application to enable stroke survivors’ to actively participate in theirrecovery in the rural and remote context.AIMS: The aim of this study was to explore rural and remote stroke survivors’ perspectives ontheir recovery journey, giving consideration to the diverse NWQ population. This studyformed the first phase of a larger PhD project investigating the use of technology to enablestroke survivors to actively participate in their recovery in rural and remote areas.METHODS: A qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews was undertaken.Data was collected and analysed thematically using constructivist grounded theory principles.Adult stroke survivors living, working and travelling through NWQ were purposefullyrecruited.RESULTS: A summary of the preliminary results will be presented including participant andinterview characteristics. Emerging themes that will be described will highlight theimportance of stroke survivors ‘being connected’ and believing ‘recovery is ongoing’ to theindividual’s recovery journey.CONCLUSIONS: This study will inform subsequent phases of the PhD, culminating in a seriesof case studies trialing technology options that enable stroke survivors to actively participatein their recovery journey.14

Abstract 4: Martina Taylor;It’s just the beginning; Development of student-led Allied Health Services in the LowerGulfBACKGROUND: The undersupply of allied health (AH) professionals working in rural andremote Australia is nationally recognized. To develop the AH workforce in and for outbackQueensland and reduce workforce maldistribution, the Mount Isa Centre for Rural andRemote Health (MICRRH) is attempting to address this issue by developing models ofstudent placement that not only complements existing health services but develops workready AH graduates who are passionate about rural and remote, and Indigenous health.AIMS: To utilize service learning to enable the development of inter-professional, student-ledAH services that respond to unmet needs identified by rural and remote communities inoutback Queensland.METHODS: MICRRH recruited Allied Health Clinical Leads to develop AH clinical placementopportunities and provide clinical supervision and education. A partnership agreement wasestablished between MICRRH and an independent school in the lower Gulf community ofNormanton to pilot an AH student placement for SP and OT. Furthermore, PlacementCoordinators within Queensland universities were provided with information regarding theplacement to facilitate student allocation. Two SP students and one OT student spent 4weeks of their 4th year placement with MICRRH providing clinical services to the childrenwithin the school. The clinical services were provided directly by the AH students under thesupervision of experienced health professionals and included a combination of assessmentand individual, group and whole class intervention based on each child’s developmental goals.RESULTS: Feedback from the AH students indicated that the placement allowed them todevelop their clinical skills and feel as though they made a valuable contribution to thecommunity. Preliminary teacher feedback indicated that the clinical services provided wereprofessional and responsive to the identified needs.CONCLUSIONS: Based on the results and feedback received, service learning may provideNorth West Queensland communities access to alternative AH services whilst contributing tothe growth and development of work-ready AH graduates.15

Abstract 5: Deb Phillips;Occupational Therapy led paediatric telehealth review clinic – keeping kids closer to homeBACKGROUND: The Occupational Therapy (OT) Led Paediatric Burn Telehealth Review clinicprovides reviews to children in rural and remote communities in North Queensland followingburn injury. Children post burn injuries require lengthy rehabilitation and those from rural andremote communities are geographically disadvantaged compared to Townsville residents.The North Queensland Paediatric Burns Service (NQPBS) at The Townsville Hospital (TTH)identified rural and remote children require an alternative service such as telehealth.AIMS: The OT Led Paediatric Burn Telehealth review clinic was developed to maximizeefficiencies and reduce the burden of travel for children and families post burn injury fromregional, rural and remote communities in North Queensland. These efficiencies are obtainedby having the Occupational Therapist replace the paediatric surgeons’ reviews of scars and todelegate clinical and non-clinical tasks to an Allied Health Assistant (AHA).METHODS: An Allied Health Professional Office of Queensland (AHPOQ)Expanded/Extended Scope of Practice grant was secured to develop the model. This grantallowed guideline establishment including clinical governance, outcome measurement, anddelegation to AHA frameworks. Telehealth consultations have been delivered into healthfacilities or directly into family’s homes using the Queensland Telehealth Portal.RESULTS: The OT Led Telehealth Paediatric Burn Telehealth Review Clinic has recruitedmore than twenty families to date. Families have received between one and three individualtelehealth consultations, with savings in travel of between two and twelve hours perconsultation.CONCLUSIONS: We recommend the OT Led Paediatric Burn Telehealth Review cliniccontinue on as a method of rehabilitation service delivery from the NQPBS for children fromregional, rural and remote communities in the future. Success of this local study will provide atemplate; including resources we have developed, for other Health Services to implement themodel.16

Abstract 6: Natasha Hart/Jayne Henshall;1800SPEECH – Sorry your call cannot be connected. Please check your bandwidth and tryagainBACKGROUND: Therapists within the Department of Education and Training (DET) arecommitted to ongoing evaluation of evidence based practices and innovation to improveoutcomes for students. Queensland has a large number of schools based in rural and remoteareas, which face the challenges of limited allied health support. Demographic data indicatesvery remote areas have as little as 1/8th the number of allied health workers compared tomajor capitals. These geographical factors contribute to disadvantage for students in ruraland remote areas.DET Allied Health services in the western portion of North Queensland region are based inMount Isa. In order to try and effectively support a service district twice the size of Tasmania,the region utilises a hub and spoke model. For the SLP team 50hours each term is spent onoutreach travel, effectively reducing direct service time by seven days.Schools based in rural and remote locations receive their services in a block of time (e.g. SLPvisits once per term for a number of days, with follow up support provided via programmingand phone support). However, s

The Outback Allied Health Forum was an initiative of the NWHHS Allied Health team under the leadership of Andrea Leigh, former Director of Allied Health, North West Hospital and Health Service. The forum presents the collaborative innovations of the many Allied Health Profes

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