LESAT: The Lean Enterprise Self Assessment Tool

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LESAT: The Lean EnterpriseSelf Assessment ToolProfessor Deborah NightingaleOctober 25, 2005

Outline LESAT Architecture and Practices Assessment Process Case Studies Discussion Assessment Results Transformation InsightsESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 2

How Do I Assess My Progress? Enterprise transformation experience identified need forassessment tool Lean Enterprise Self Assessment Tool (LESAT)developed by joint industry / government / MIT team incollaboration with UK LAI LESAT supports both “As-Is” AnalysisAND “To-Be” Vision Targeted at Enterprise Leadership TeamESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 3

What Is LESAT?Tool for executiveself-assessment ofthe present state of“leanness” of anenterprise and itsreadiness to change12345AssessmentMatrixWorldClassESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean ls Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 4

LESAT Tool Requirements Simple, easy to use by enterprise leadership Focus on lean attributes Alignment with business performanceplanning (goals and results) Provides guidance for “next steps” Gap analysis capability Ability to accommodate both single andaligned organizations (teaming, partnerships,suppliers) within an enterpriseESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 5

Process ArchitectureView of Lean EnterpriseLife Cycle ProcessesEnabling InfrastructureProcessesEnterprise LeadershipProcessesESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean EnterpriseSource: Lean Aerospace Initiative, MIT 2001 Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 6

LESAT Structure is Consistentwith Enterprise ArchitectureSection ISection IISection re/ LeadershipProcessesProcessesProcessesLife Cycle ProcessesEnabling InfrastructureProcessesEnterprise LeadershipProcessesSource: Lean Aerospace Initiative, MIT 2001ESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 7

Process Capability Maturity Levels Exceptional, well-defined, innovative approach is fullydeployed across the extended enterprise (across internaland external value streams); recognized as best practice.Level 5Level 4Level 3Level 2Level 1 On-going refinement and continuous improvement acrossthe enterprise; improvement gains are sustained. A systematic approach/methodology deployed in varying stagesacross most areas; facilitated with metrics; good sustainment. General awareness; informal approach deployed in a few areaswith varying degrees of effectiveness and sustainment. Some awareness of this practice; sporadic improvement activities maybe underway in a few areas.Source: U.S. and U.K. Lean Aerospace Initiative, 2001ESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 8

Lean Enterprise Practices There are 54 lean enterprise practices in theassessment, divided amongst the three major sections Section 1 Leadership/Transformation (28 practices) Section 2 Lifecycle Processes (18 Practices) Section 3 Enabling Infrastructure (8 Practices) Each practice is assessed on a capability maturityscale of 1 to 5 There is a practice maturity definition for everymaturity level in every practice, provided on a maturitymatrix assessment sheetESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 9

Enterprise LevelSection ISection I:Lean Transformation/Leadership Practices directly linked toenterprise Transition to LeanModel (TTL) Assesses the followingelements: Strategic integrationLeadership and commitmentValue stream analysis and balancingChange managementStructure and systemsLean transformation planning,execution and monitoringESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 10

Enterprise LevelRoadmapI.BI.BEntry/Re-entryCycleDecision toPursueEnterpriseTransformationI.AI.AFocus on the ValueStreamAdopt LeanParadigmBuild VisionConvey UrgencyFoster Lean LearningMake the CommitmentObtain Senior Mgmt.Buy-inLong Term CycleI.DI.DI.CI.CInitialLeanVisionMap Value StreamInternalize VisionSet Goals & MetricsIdentify & Involve KeyStakeholdersDetailedLeanVisionDevelop Lean Structure &BehaviorOrganize for Lean ImplementationIdentify & Empower Change AgentsAlign IncentivesAdapt Structure & Systems EnvironmentalCorrectiveAction IndicatorsI.GI.GEnterpriseStrategicPlanningFocus on ContinuousImprovementDetailedCorrective ActionIndicatorsMonitor Lean ProgressNurture the ProcessRefine the PlanCapture & Adopt New KnowledgeOutcomes onEnterpriseMetricsESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean EnterpriseShort Term CycleI.FI.FI.EI.ELeanTransformationFrameworkCreate & RefineTransformation PlanIdentify & Prioritize ActivitiesCommit ResourcesProvide Education & Training Implement Lean InitiativesDevelop Detailed PlansImplement Lean Activities Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyEnterpriseLevelTransformationPlanPage 11

LESAT Section I28 Lean PracticesI.A. Enterprise Strategic PlanningI.A.1 Integration of Lean in strategic planningprocessI.A.2 Focus on customer valueI.A.3 Leveraging the extended enterpriseI.B. Adopt Lean ParadigmI.B.1 Learning and education in “Lean” forenterprise leadersI.B.2 Senior management commitmentI.B.3 Lean enterprise visionI.B.4 A sense of urgencyI.C. Focus on the Value StreamI.C.1 Understanding current value streamI.C.2 Enterprise flowI.C.3 Designing future value streamI.C.4 Performance measuresI.D Develop Lean Structure and BehaviorI.D.1 Enterprise organizational orientationI.D.2 Relationships based on mutual trustI.D.3 Open and timely communicationsESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean EnterpriseI.D.4 Employee empowermentI.D.5 Incentive alignmentI.D.6 Innovation encouragementI.D.7 Lean change agentsI.E. Create & Refine Transformation PlanI.E.1 Enterprise-level Lean transformation planI.E.2 Commit resources for LeanimprovementsI.E.3 Provide education and trainingI.F. Implement Lean InitiativesI.F.1 Development of detailed plans based onenterprise planI.F.2 Tracking detailed implementationI.G. Focus on Continuous ImprovementI.G.1 Structured continuous improvementprocessesI.G.2 Monitoring lean progressI.G.3 Nurturing the processI.G.4 Capturing lessons learnedI.G.5 Impacting enterprise strategic planning Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 12

LESAT Section I: ExampleI.B.3 Lean Enterprise Vision - new mental model of the enterpriseLevel 1Senior leaders have varying visions of lean, from none towell-definedLevel 2Senior leaders adopt common vision of leanLevel 3Lean vision has been communicated and is understoodby most employeesLevel 4Common vision of lean is shared by the extendedenterpriseLevel 5Stakeholders have internalized the lean vision & are anactive part of achieving itSource: U.S. and U.K. Lean Aerospace Initiative, 2001ESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 13

LESAT Section IISection II: Life Cycle ProcessesAssess: Enterprise level core processes AcquisitionProgram ManagementRequirements DefinitionProduct/Process DevelopmentSupply Chain ManagementProductionDistribution and Support Key integrative practicesESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 14

Life Cycle Processes SupportValue DeliveryGeneric Product Value erviceProductDispose/UpdateProductII. A Business Acquisition & Program ManagementII. B Requirements DefinitionII. C Develop Product and ProcessII. D Supply Chain ManagementII. E Produce ProductII. F Distribute & Service ProductESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 15

LESAT Section II18 Lean Practices II.A. Business Acquisition and Program Management II.A.1 Leverage Lean capability for businessgrowth II.A.2 Optimize the capability and utilizationof assets II.A.3 Provide capability to manage risk, cost,schedule and performance II.A.4 Allocate resources for programdevelopment effortsII.B. Requirements Definition II.B.1 Establish a requirements definitionprocess to optimize lifecycle value II.B.2 Utilize data from the extendedenterprise to optimize future requirementdefinitionsII.C. Develop Product and Process II.C.1 Incorporate customer value into designof products and processes II.C.2 Incorporate downstream stakeholdervalues into products and processes II.C.3 Integrate product and processdevelopmentESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise II.D. Manage Supply Chain II.E. Produce Product II.D.1 Define and develop supplier networkII.D.2 Optimize network-wide performanceII.D.3 Foster Innovation and knowledgesharing throughout the supplier networkII.E.1 Utilize production knowledge andcapabilitiesII.E.2 Establish and maintain a leanproduction systemII.F. Distribute and Service Product II.F.1 Align sales and marketing toproductionII.F.2 Distribute product in a lean fashionII.F.3 Enhance value of delivered productsand services to customers and the enterpriseII.F.4 Provide post-delivery service, support,and sustainability Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 16

LESAT Section II: ExampleII.C.2 Incorporate Downstream Stakeholder Values (Manufacturing,Support, etc.) into Products & Processes - Understanding downstreamstakeholders allows value to flow seamlessly to customerLevel 1Manufacturing issues are considered late in designLevel 2Manufacturing & assembly issues are considered earlier in projects,but in an ad hoc manner. Supplier & cost considerations are limitedLevel 3Multi-functional teams include some downstream disciplines and keysuppliersLevel 4Priorities of downstream stakeholders are quantified as early aspossible in design, and used for process evaluation and improvementLevel 5Downstream stakeholders’ values in the extended enterprise arequantified, and balanced via tradeoffs, as a continuous part of theprocessESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 17

LESAT Section IIISection III: Enabling InfrastructureAssess critical supporting processes FinanceInformation TechnologyHuman ResourcesEnvironmental Health & Safety8 Lean Practices Lean Organizational Enablers Lean Process EnablersESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 18

LESAT Section III:Diagnostic Questions Are common tools and systems being used across theenterprise? How well have the financial and accounting systems beenintegrated with non-traditional measures of value creation? How well can stakeholders retrieve financial information asrequired? Are human resource practices reviewed to assure intellectualcapital matches process needs? Are enabling infrastructure processes being aligned to valuestream flow? Do processes create the least amount of environmentalhazards practical? Is the information technology system compatible withstakeholder communication and analysis needs?ESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 19

LESAT Supporting Materials Introductory Presentation LESAT Matrices &Facilitator’s Guide TTL Roadmap & Guide Summary ScoreCalculator Glossary of TermsESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 20

Outline LESAT Architecture and Practices Assessment Process Case Studies Discussion Assessment Results InsightsESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 21

Suggested Methodology forEmploying LESATStep 1: Facilitated meeting to introduce tool.Enterprise leader championsStep 2: Enterprise leaders and staff conductLESAT assessmentStep 3: Leadership reconvenes to jointlydetermine present maturity levelStep 4: Leadership determinesdesired level and measures gapStep 5: Develop actionplan and prioritizeresourcesESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 22

Summary Form ExampleLESAT Enterprise Self-Assessment Tool (LESAT)Section I - Lean Transformation/LeadershipProcess Definition: Develop and deploy lean implementation plans throughout the enterprise leading to (1)- long-term sustainability, (2)acquiring competitive advantage and (3) satisfaction of stakeholders.Capability LevelTTL LinkLean PracticeLean CharacteristicCurrent DesiredI.A. EnterpriseI.A.1 - Integration of Lean in strategicLean impacts growth, profitability and marketStrategic Planningplanning processpenetrationI.A.2 - Focus on customer valueCustomers pull value from enterprise value streamI.A.3 - Leveraging the extended enterprise Value stream extends from customer through theenterprise to suppliersAverageI.B. Adopt LeanI.B.1 - Le arning and education in “Lean”“Unlearning” the old, learning the newParadigmfor enterprise leadersI.B.2 - Senior management commitmentSenior management leading it personallyI.B.3 - Le an enterprise visionNew mental model of the enterpriseI.B.4 - A sense of urgencyThe primary driving force for LeanAverageI.C. Focus on theI.C.1 - Unde rstanding current value stream How we now deliver value to customersValue StreamI.C.2 - En terprise flow“Single piece flow” of materials and informationI.C.3 - Des igning future value streamValue stream to meet the enterprise visionI.C.4 - Performance measuresPerformance measures drive enterprise behaviorAverageI.D. Develop LeanI.D.1 - Enterprise organizational orientation Organize to support value deliveryStructure andI.D.2 - Relationships based on mutual trust “Win-win” vs. “we-they”BehaviorI.D.3 - Open and timely communicationsInformation exchanged when requiredI.D.4 - Employee empowermentDecision-making at lowest possible levelI.D.5 - Incentive alignmentReward the behavior you wantI.D.6 - Innovation encouragementFrom risk aversion to risk rewardingI.D.7 - Lean change agentsThe inspiration and drivers of changeAverageESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 23

LESAT Desired Score Can beTailored for Each Process AreaA Companyʼs Strategic Plan for a TailoredCapability Goal matched to the business objectives.Capability Level543GapCurrent Capability210LESAT Enterprise Process AreasESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 24

Ground Rules Perform the assessment from a total enterpriseperspective, NOT individual functional area Attempt to assess every practice; leave blank if N/A orif you don’t know Scoring the practices Each level assumes that lower level criteria are met If between levels, score at the lower level Note “evidence” for level selected Identify opportunities to increase maturity level Seek assistance from company facilitatorESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprise Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 25

Enterprise Level RoadmapLong Term CycleEntry/Re-entryCycleAdopt LeanParadigm Build Vision Convey Urgency Foster Lean Learning Make the Commitment Obtain Senior Mgmt.Buy-inDecision cPlanningFocus on the ValueStreamDevelop Lean Structure &Behavior Map Value Stream Organize for Lean ImplementationDetailed Internalize Vision Identify & Empower Change AgentsLean Set Goals & Metrics Align IncentivesVision Identify & Involve KeyStructure & SystemsSECTION I: LEAN on: Develop, deploy, and manage lean implementation plans throughout theenterprise, leading to: (1)- long-term sustainability, (2)- acquiring competitive advantage,and (3)- satisfaction of stakeholders; along with a continuous improvement in all threeEnvironmentalShortTerm Cycleparameters.LeanCorrectiveTransformationAction IndicatorsI.A Enterprise Strategic Planning - thedecision to pursue a lean transformation is strategic in nature. Its impact throughout theFrameworkDetailedenterprise is profound and pervasive, affecting all business practices and processes. The lean enterprise will behave in a fundamentallyCorrectiveActionFocus on Continuousnew manner,significantly eliminatingand enhancing relationships with all stakeholders.Create & wasteRefineIndicatorsDiagnostic Questions TransformationImprovementleaders aware of the strategic opportunities (i.e., greater growth, profitability, and market Are enterprisePlanpenetration)associated with transitioning to a “lean enterprise”? Monitor Lean Progress Identify & Prioritize Activities Areenterpriseleaders familiar with the dramatic increases in competitiveness that many companies have Nurture the Process Commit Resourcesrealized as a result of transitioning to lean? Refine the Plan Provide Education & Training Has a suitable strategy for growth been identified to utilize resources freed up by improvements? Capture & Adopt New KnowledgeLean Indicators Lean implementation is included explicitly in the enterprise strategic plan.Enterprise Results oflean implementation impact future strategic planning.Outcomes onImplement Lean InitiativesLevel is strongly influenced by stakeholders and customers value. Strategic planningEnterpriseLPLeanCapability LevelsTransformation Develop DetailedPlansMetrics#Level 1Level 2Level 3Level 4Level 5PracticesPlan ImplementA.1Lean IntegrationActivitiesStrategic plansleverageLean is recognized butObjectiveThe business growthTransitioning to leanConcepts and benefitsofImpactsrelegated to lowerimplications of lean are adopted as a keyof lean principles andthe results of leanLean in Strategiclevels & is fragmentedunderstood and leanenterprise strategy andpractices are notimplementation toPlanning Processimplementation plansis included in strategicevident in culture orachieve growth,InitialLeanVision Lean Roadmap Action Plan Lean impacts growth,profitability and marketpenetrationA.2Focus onCustomer ValueCustomers pull valuefrom enterprise valuestreamA.3Leveraging theExtendedEnterpriseValue stream extendsfrom customer throughthe enterprise tosuppliersESD.61J / 16.852J: Integrating the Lean Enterprisebusiness plansare formulated, but notintegrated into thestrategic planplanprofitability & marketpositionMeans of definingvalue to customer(s) isinformal &unstructuredStructured process fordefining value isapplied to selectedcustomersHow the enterprise canbest contribute tocustomer's success iswell definedCustomer valuestrongly influences thestrategic directionCompetitiveness isenhanced as customervalue becomespredominant drivingforce throughout theextended enterpriseRelations withcustomers and suppliersreflect a "We-They"mentalityInitial opportunitiesidentified forestablishing extendedenterprise linkagesStrategic planningprocess explicitlyincludes considerationof key stakeholders invalue streamsIntegration & balancingof stakeholder valuesvia collaborativesupplier relations &strategic partneringIntegration of theextended enterprisecontributes toinnovation, growth,increased profitability& market positionSuccess Criteria/ IssuesMajor Milestones Deborah Nightingale, 2005 Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPage 26

I.B.3 Lean Enterprise Vision - new mental model of the enterprise Senior leaders have varying visions of lean, from none to well-defined Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Senior leaders adopt common vision of lean Lean vision has been communicated and is understood by most employees C

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