2017-18 LAS Humble

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2017 - 2018 LAS PlanHumble Independent School DistrictDistrict Name:District LAS Contact (primary):Email:Phone:Allowable range 1% - 50%Weighting OverviewLocal / StateLocal Accountability SystemState Accountability SystemAllowable range 50% - 99%When added together, the weightingLocal / State Totalshould equal 100%DomainIf the plan includes 2 or more domains, AcademicsWeighting (%)5050100Weighting (%)Elem – 40the weighting range for each domain is Culture & Climate20% - 60%.Extra / Co-Curricular*Pending TEA approval, someFuture-Ready Learningcomponents may be categorized into LD 1*LD 2*one of four locally-developed (LD)LD 3*domains.LD 4*When added together, the weight of theTotal of LAS DomainsLAS Domains should equal 100%Component Summary*Elem – 30Elem – 30100Districts may use this space to create a master list of all components organized by domain forquick reference. The component summary isnot required* for LAS Plan Submission. Within eachdomain, the total weight of all components should equal 100%.Domain NameAcademicsComponent (A1, B2, etc.)A1A2Culture and ClimateB1B2B3Extra / Co-CurricularNONEFuture ReadyD1D2D3Weighting (%)5050343333343333

Campus ListPlease list the names of all campuses in the district and identify which school type and, if applicable, the schoolgroup* each campus belongs to according to the district LAS Plan.* Pending TEA approval, districts may organize selected campuses within a school type into a school group to ensurea better fit of components for those campuses.School NameSchool TypeSchool Group*(Example 1) Lone Star ESElementaryn/a(Example 2) Mozart MSMSMagnetAtascocita Springs ElementaryElementary SchoolBear Branch ElementaryElementary SchoolDeerwood ElementaryElementary SchoolEagle Springs ElementaryElementary SchoolElm Grove ElementaryElementary SchoolFall Creek ElementaryElementary SchoolFoster ElementaryElementary SchoolGreentree ElementaryElementary SchoolGroves ElementaryElementary SchoolHidden Hollow ElementaryElementary SchoolHumble ElementaryElementary SchoolJack Fields ElementaryElementary SchoolLakeland ElementaryElementary SchoolLakeshore ElementaryElementary SchoolMaplebrook ElementaryElementary SchoolNorth Belt ElementaryElementary SchoolOak Forest ElementaryElementary SchoolOaks ElementaryElementary SchoolPark Lakes ElementaryElementary SchoolPine Forest ElementaryElementary SchoolRidge Creek ElementaryElementary SchoolRiver Pines ElementaryElementary SchoolShadow Forest ElementaryElementary SchoolSummerwood ElementaryElementary SchoolTimbers ElementaryElementary SchoolWhispering Pines ElementaryElementary SchoolWillow Creek ElementaryElementary SchoolWoodland Hills ElementaryElementary School

Domain: AcademicsProvide the name of the component and themetric that will be used to evaluate it.Component Name / MetricComponent A1Paralleled Numbers of BE/ESL-Certified Teachers toNumbers of English Language LearnersElementary, Elementary-Magnet, HS, etc.School Type / School Group Elementary SchoolComponent A2Campus Attendance RatesElementary SchoolProvide the weight assigned to this component Component Weight (%)within the domain.50%50%Why has the district selected this component Rationaleto spotlight in the LAS Plan? How was thiscomponent identified as a high-leverage area?Describe the relevance and utility of thiscomponent - equitable, rigorous, withemphasis on quality of impact and to theextent practicable, focused on growth and/ormaintaining high levels of proficiency.With the increase of English Learners in Humble ISD, thedistrict has placed a focus on providing a comparablepercentage of instructors who are certified in BE or ESL,especially on campuses with the highest number of ELstudents. This component was designed to emphasizethe need for campuses to encourage and support the BEor ESL certification process for more of their teaching staffand to hire new teachers with the BE/ESL certifications,especially on those campuses with the largest ELpopulations.Good student attendance is the foundational componentthat must be in place for effective instruction to impact ALLstudents. In order to emphasize continuous improvement incampus attendance rates, this component has beenincluded. Future work may focus on the category of chronicabsenteeism, which can be a hidden componentcontributing to a campus’ overall low attendance rate, andalso viewing attendance data by subpopulations.Identify the source(s) of data for eachcomponent and the availability of baselinedata.Data Source / Baseline Data Data for this component is compiled from multipleData is collected directly from the student informationsources. The EL population of each campus is captured system for the overall ADA attendance rate for eachas of snapshot date from the Decision Ed datacampus.warehouse, then compared to total campus enrollment forthe percent of EL students. Data on teachers with BEand/or ESL certifications is gathered each year by theDirector of Bilingual and ESL Services and verified byHuman Resources. The total number of teachers on eachcampus is pulled from OnDataSuite and verified with HR.Provide an overview of the process for data Timeline for Data Collectioncollection and analysis, including timelines for and Analysisany related activities such as staff trainingand/or calibration, assessment and surveywindows including make-up testing and followup surveys (if needed), and data analysis.This data is collected following the snapshot date eachyear. Certifications are verified by HR and any newcertifications which are recently acquired added in thespring semester.Data is collected after the processes for day totals are run atthe end of the school year and the final ADA attendancerate is calculated.

Domain: AcademicsDescribe the processes to ensure the data is Methodologyvalid, reliable, and auditable, such as practicesto encourage and assess representativeparticipation in surveys, procedures forcalculating data including determination of cutpoints and growth targets, and protocols fordata storage.Component A1The data is pulled directly from the Decision Ed datawarehouse using a (fixed) search subroutine, whichallows for a consistent and reliable method of tabulatingstudent counts. The data will be validated by two otherdistrict data sources (On Data Suite and PowerSchoolSIS), and search results saved in pdf format for auditingpurposes. These results will be kept electronically on adistrict network server, which is backed up daily. Overallstudent enrollment is calculated at the same time that theEL enrollment information is captured to ensureconsistency in the comparison. Teacher certifications areverified by HR. Cut points were determined based onmethodology from the CaSE process.Component A2Attendance data is verified at a number of levels, from theteacher reviewing and signing off on attendance each 6weeks, principal verification, and the district-level verificationprocesses. The data is pulled directly a PowerSchoolCognos search subroutine, which allows for a consistentand reliable method of tabulating student counts. The datawill be validated by two other district data sources (On DataSuite and Decision Ed), and search results saved in pdfformat for auditing purposes. These results will be keptelectronically on a district network server, which is backedup daily. Cut points were determined based onmethodology from the CaSE process.Describe the scaling process to be used forthis component.SCALINGSCALINGScaling Process

Domain: Culture & ClimateComponent B1Provide the name of the componentParents and Community Members Involved inand the metric that will be used toComponent Name / School Activities and School Cultureevaluate it.MetricElementary, Elementary-Magnet, HS,etcProvide the weight assigned to thiscomponent within the domain.Why has the district selected thiscomponent to spotlight in the LASPlan? How was this componentidentified as a high-leverage area?Describe the relevance and utility of thiscomponent - equitable, rigorous, withemphasis on quality of impact and tothe extent practicable, focused ongrowth and/or maintaining high levels ofproficiency.Component B2Staff and/or Students Involved in CommunityActivities On or Off CampusComponent B3Communication with ParentsSchool Type / SchoolGroupElementary School LevelElementary School LevelElementary School LevelComponent Weight(%)34%33%33%RationaleAs stated in an article in neaToday entitled TheEnduring Importance of Parental Involvement,“Ongoing research shows that family engagement inschools improves student achievement, reducesabsenteeism, and restores parents’ confidence intheir children’s education. Students with involvedparents or other caregivers earn higher grades andtest scores, have better social skills, and showimproved behavior.” (Eskelsen Garcia & Thornton,2014). As part of our CaSE development in 2014, asubcommittee for Parent and CommunityInvolvement developed three areas of importance tobe measured for campus interactions with familiesand the community. The first area addressed in thiscategory focused on measuring the activeparticipation of parents and community members inthe school through volunteering, mentoring, PSTA,parent informational events, etc.As stated in the preceding component, in our CaSEdevelopment in 2014, a subcommittee for Parent andCommunity Involvement developed three areas ofimportance to be measured for campus interactionswith families and the community. The second areaaddressed in this category focused on the staff andstudents themselves becoming involved in thecommunity with an outward focus. This includedcommunity outreach and service, showcase events,charity drives, fundraising for causes, and communityvolunteering.There are many new and creative ways to buildcampus communication with parents/guardians andschools should expand their methods to broaden theirreach and to increase the effectiveness andconvenience of communication. This third componentof Parent and Community Involvement wasincorporated in an effort to encourage campuses toutilize a multitude of methods in reaching out andcommunicating with their families.This component is a campus self-reported itemdetermined by a scoring rubric. The rubric awardspoints for each opportunity available for parents andthe community. Fourteen areas of participationwere listed and campuses were encouraged toprovide ten or more of these areas to score thehighest rating. SEE PARENT/COMMUNITYRUBRIC (PART 1) INCLUDED.This component is a campus self-reported itemdetermined by a scoring rubric. The rubric awardspoints for each opportunity available for outreach toparents and the community. Seven areas ofparticipation were listed and campuses wereencouraged to provide six or more of these areas toscore the highest rating. SEEPARENT/COMMUNITY RUBRIC (PART 2)INCLUDED.This is a campus self-reported item determined by ascoring rubric. The rubric awards a point value foreach method of communication implemented withfamilies, graduated for higher frequency of contact toaward more points. Five overall methods ofcommunication ranging from minimum to maximumfrequency were listed, and campuses wereencouraged to score 60 or higher on the rubric for thehighest rating. SEE PARENT/COMMUNITY RUBRIC(PART 3) INCLUDED.Identify the source(s) of data for eachcomponent and the availability ofbaseline data.Data Source /Baseline Data

Domain: Culture & ClimateProvide an overview of the process fordata collection and analysis, includingtimelines for any related activities suchas staff training and/or calibration,assessment and survey windowsTimeline for Dataincluding make-up testing and follow-upCollection andsurveys (if needed), and data analysis.AnalysisComponent B1Throughout the school year, for each event or typeof parental/community participation, campusesretain supporting documentation/evidence.Campuses are provided a reporting tool to submit tothe district office to determine their ratings in thisarea, based on the scoring rubric and theirsupporting documentation. The campus rubric issubmitted to the district in May and documentation isposted in an online folder and verified by thedepartment of Evaluation.Component B2Throughout the school year, for each event or type ofstudent/staff community involvement activity,campuses retain supporting evidence. Campusesare provided a reporting tool to submit to the districtoffice to defend their ratings in this area, based onthe scoring rubric and their supportingdocumentation.Component B3Throughout the school year, the campus retainssupporting evidence of their family communications.Campuses are provided a reporting tool to submit tothe district office to defend their ratings in this area,based on the scoring rubric and their supportingdocumentation.Describe the processes to ensure thedata is valid, reliable, and auditable,such as practices to encourage andassess representative participation insurveys, procedures for calculating dataincluding determination of cut pointsand growth targets, and protocols fordata storage.Campuses maintain supporting documentation in anelectronic folder throughout the school year to justifyearning the points in each area. The completedrubrics are returned in late spring, at which time theonline supporting documentation is reviewed forcompletion. Results will be saved in pdf format forauditing purposes and kept electronically on adistrict network server, which is backed up daily.Checks for validity and cut points were determinedbased on methodology from the CaSE process.Campuses maintain supporting documentation in anelectronic folder throughout the school year to justifyearning the points in each area. The completedrubrics are returned in late spring and the onlinesupporting documentation is reviewed for completion.Results will be saved in pdf format for auditingpurposes and kept electronically on a district networkserver, which is backed up daily. Checks for validityand cut points were determined based onmethodology from the CaSE process.Campuses maintain supporting documentation in anelectronic folder throughout the school year to justifyearning the points in each area. The completedrubrics are returned in late spring, at which time theonline supporting documentation is reviewed forcompletion. Results will be saved in pdf format forauditing purposes and kept electronically on a districtnetwork server, which is backed up daily. Checks forvalidity and cut points were determined based onmethodology from the CaSE process.SCALINGA – 9 points100 - (10*(12-RAW)/(12-9))B – 6-8 points89-(9*((9 - 1)-RAW)/((9-1) -6))C – 3-5 points79-(9*((6 - 1) - RAW)/((6-1)-3))D – 1-2 points69 - (9*((3 - 1) - RAW)/(3-1)-2))F – 0 points59SCALINGA – 6 points100 - (10*(7-RAW)/(7-6))B – 4-5 points89-(9*((6 - 1)-RAW)/((6-1) -4))C – 2-3 points79-(9*((4 - 1) - RAW)/((4-1)-2))D – 1 point69 - (9*((2 - 1) - RAW)/(2-1))F – 0 points59SCALING - Points are awarded in 5 point increments.A – 75 points100 - (10*(85-RAW)/(85-75))B – 40-70 points89-(9*((75-1)-RAW)/((75-1) -40))C – 20-35 points79-(9*((40 - 1) - RAW)/((40-1)-20))D – 10-15 points69 - (9*((20 - 1) - RAW)/((20-1)-10))F – 0-5 points59-(29*((10-1) - RAW)/(10 - 1))MethodologyDescribe the scaling process to be usedfor this component.Scaling Process

Domain: Future-Ready Learning DomainComponent D1Provide the name of theComponentPortrait of a Graduate Initiation Phasecomponent and the metric that Name / Metricwill be used to evaluate it.Component D2Number of College and Career Enrichment Events Providedon the Campus (i.e. Guest Speakers, College Days, CareerDays, Junior Achievement, etc.)Component D3Number of Student-Centered College and CareerExploration Activities Provided on the Campus (i.e.Biztown, Math Olympians, Ecobots, CommunityGardens, Video Announcements, Science Fair,Science Labs, etc.)Elementary, ElementaryMagnet, HS, etc.Elementary School LevelElementary School LevelSchool Type / Elementary School LevelSchool GroupProvide the weight assigned to Componentthis component within theWeight (%)domain.34%33%33%Why has the district selectedRationalethis component to spotlight inthe LAS Plan? How was thiscomponent identified as a highleverage area? Describe therelevance and utility of thiscomponent - equitable, rigorous,with emphasis on quality ofimpact and to the extentpracticable, focused on growthand/or maintaining high levels ofproficiency.To align with the district vision for our futuregraduates, Humble ISD brought together students,parents, educators, business representatives andcommunity members into a group of about 80 peoplethe district named “The Dream Team.” The DreamTeam discussed what schools should focus on -above and beyond basic academic expectations -- tobest support learners in the 21st century. After muchdiscussion, and consideration of 2,271 thoughtssubmitted online, the Dream Team recommended sixcompetencies to comprise a Portrait of an Humble ISDGraduate: communicator, global citizen, criticalthinker, creative innovator, leader and collaborator,and personally responsible. Humble ISD is buildingimplementation plans so that students haveopportunities to develop these six competencies inaddition to the academic proficiencies expected of allTexas students.In order to create an environment where students andfamilies are college and career ready, there needs to be afoundation built and a dream planted as early as ourelementary grades. As the world around us continues tochange, our students need to be exposed to new futureopportunities and opportunities for acquiring a skillset toreach their desired goals. One areas that can contribute tothe exposure is providing many opportunities for college andcareer enrichment, including drawing in guest speakers fromvarious fields, college days where students become excitedto set a dream for higher education, career days which giveinsight to a variety of career choices, and organizations likeJunior Achievement to build skills for future work.Research shows that students who are hands-on,actively involved in challenging work are mostengaged, more capable of retaining the knowledge,and tend to maintain interest in further growth in thatarea. This component is designed to give studentsthese opportunities for active college and careerexploration.The initial step is to develop as many qualityopportunities as possible on all of our campuses andthen to broaden the scope and increase theparticipation rates. As our LAS is developed for futureyears, the emphasis will be on the actual percent ofstudents attending the College and Career ExplorationThis component is still in the initial stage and is designed to Activities and/or on the percent of positive surveyincrease the number of opportunities offered to ourresponses from participation.elementary students on every campus. As our LAS isdeveloped for future years, the emphasis will be on the actualpercent of students attending the College and CareerEnrichment Events and/or on the percent of positive surveyresponses from participation.

Domain: Future-Ready Learning DomainIdentify the source(s) of data for Data Source /each component and theBaseline Dataavailability of baseline data.Component D1This component represents the progress on theimplementation of this Portrait of a Graduate (POG)vision. This is the initial stage of implementation, andthe rubric used in this component represents ameasure of campus fidelity in the training of theirleadership team, campus staff, developing teacherspecialists, and evidence of individual classroomexperimentation. (SEE POG RUBRIC INCLUDED)Component D2Data collected for this component is self-reported by thecampus principal. Campuses maintain supportingdocumentation in an electronic folder for the evidence ofcampus enrichment events and opportunities.Component D3Data collected for this component is self-reported bythe campus principal and verified by the districtdepartment organizing events. Campuses maintainsupporting documentation in an electronic folder for theevidence of campus enrichment events andopportunities.Provide an overview of theTimeline forThe rating of this component is based on a rubricSupporting documentation is maintained in an electronicprocess for data collection and Data Collection which is comprised of faculty and leadershipfolder throughout the school year and is submitted to theanalysis, including timelines for and Analysis attendance records for Portrait of a GraduateDirector of Evaluation in the May LAS submission report.any related activities such astrainings, campus immersion evidence, and evidencestaff training and/or calibration,of classroom experimentation of techniques learned inassessment and surveythe training.windows including make-uptesting and follow-up surveys (ifneeded), and data analysis.Supporting documentation is maintained in anelectronic folder throughout the school year and issubmitted to the Director of Evaluation in the May LASsubmission report.Describe the processes toMethodologyensure the data is valid, reliable,and auditable, such as practicesto encourage and assessrepresentative participation insurveys, procedures forcalculating data includingdetermination of cut points andgrowth targets, and protocols fordata storage.The online supporting documentation is reviewed bythe Department of Evaluation. Results will be saved inpdf format for auditing purposes and kept electronicallyon a district network server, which is backed up daily.Checks for validity and cut points were determinedbased on methodology from the CaSE process.Campuses maintain supporting documentation in an The online supporting documentation is reviewed by theelectronic folder for the evidence of campusDepartment of Evaluation. Results will be saved in pdf formatexperimentation of POG techniques. The districtfor auditing purposes and kept electronically on a districtcalculates the percent attendance for the staff andnetwork server, which is backed up daily. Checks for validitycampus leadership in the training. The rubrics provide and cut points were determined based on methodology fromup to 12 possible points with 9 or more points earning the CaSE process.the highest rating. The results will be saved in pdfformat for auditing purposes and kept be keptelectronically on a district network server, which isbacked up daily.

Domain: Future-Ready Learning DomainDescribe the scaling process to Scalingbe used for this component.ProcessComponent D1SCALINGA – 9 or more on POG Rubric100 - ((10*(12-RAW)/(12-9))B – 7-8 on POG Rubric89-(9*((9-1)-RAW)/((9-1) -7))C – 5-6 on POG Rubric79-(9*((7 - 1) - RAW)/((7-1)-5))D – 3-4 on POG Rubric69 - ((9*((5 - 1) - RAW)/((5-1)-3))F – 0-2 on POG Rubric59-(29*((3-1) - RAW)/(3 - 1))Component D2SCALINGA – A combination of 3 or more college and careerenrichment events in one academic year100B – Two college and career enrichment events in oneacademic year89C – One college and career enrichment event college-wide inone academic year79D – Once college and career enrichment event for only aportion of the campus or a few grade levels69F – No college and career enrichment events offered59Component D3SCALINGA – A combination of three or more college and careerstudent-centered exploration activities in one academicyear100B – Two college and career student-centeredexploration activities in one academic year89C – One college and career student-centeredexploration activities in one academic year79D – One general college and career awarenessopportunity offered in one academic year69F – No college and career awareness opportunitiesoffered59

District Name:District LAS Contact (primary):Email:Phone:Allowable range 1% - 50%2017 - 2018 LAS PlanHumble Independent School DistrictWeighting OverviewLocal / StateLocal Accountability SystemAllowable range 50% - 99%State Accountability SystemWhen added together, the weighting shouldLocal / State Totalequal 100%DomainIf the plan includes 2 or more domains, theweighting range for each domain is 20% 60%.*Pending TEA approval, some componentsmay be categorized into one of four locallydeveloped (LD) domains.When added together, the weight of the LASDomains should equal 100%Weighting (%)5050100Weighting (%)AcademicsMS – 20Culture & ClimateMS – 30Extra / Co-CurricularMS – 20Future-Ready LearningMS – 30LD 1*LD 2*LD 3*LD 4*Total of LAS Domains100Component Summary*Districts may use this space to create a master list of all components organized by domain for quick reference.The component summary is not required* for LAS Plan Submission. Within each domain, the total weight of allcomponents should equal 100%.Domain NameAcademicsComponent (A1, B2, etc.)A1A2Weighting (%)5050Culture and ClimateB1B2B3343333Extra / Co-CurricularC1C25050Future ReadyD1D2D3343333

Campus ListPlease list the names of all campuses in the district and identify which school type and, if applicable, the school group*each campus belongs to according to the district LAS Plan.* Pending TEA approval, districts may organize selected campuses within a school type into a school group to ensure abetter fit of components for those campuses.School Name(Example 1) Lone Star ES(Example 2) Mozart MSAtascocita Middle SchoolCreekwood Middle SchoolHumble Middle SchoolKingwood Middle SchoolRiverwood Middle SchoolRoss Sterling Middle SchoolTimberwood Middle SchoolWestlake Middle SchoolWoodcreek Middle SchoolSchool TypeElementaryMSMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolMiddle SchoolSchool Group*n/aMagnetOpening Fall 2018

Domain: AcademicsProvide the name of the componentand the metric that will be used toevaluate it.Elementary, Elementary-Magnet, HS,etc.Provide the weight assigned to thiscomponent within the domain.Why has the district selected thiscomponent to spotlight in the LASPlan? How was this componentidentified as a high-leverage area?Describe the relevance and utility ofthis component - equitable, rigorous,with emphasis on quality of impact andto the extent practicable, focused ongrowth and/or maintaining high levelsof proficiency.Identify the source(s) of data for eachcomponent and the availability ofbaseline data.Component Name / MetricComponent A1Percentage of Students Completing One or More Advanced Course(PreAP, Advanced Math, LOTE)School Type / School Group Middle School LevelComponent Weight (%)50%RationaleContinuing research confirms that a student’s path to college actuallybegins in middle school, with a strong correlation between advancedcourses taken in middle school and college admission. Middle schoolcourses build the foundation for advanced courses in high school. Thishas been an area of emphasis for Humble ISD, especially encouragingstudents in advanced math courses and languages, along with otherPreAP courses. Often students who could be successful in an advancedcourse are overlooked, so the emphasis is to encourage as manystudents as possible to try, with multiple supports, at least one advancedcourse in their middle school years. In future years, this component canbe further broken down to compare the enrollments and completions bytypically under-represented subpopulations.Data Source / Baseline Data Course enrollments and completion records for PreAP, Advanced Mathor LOTE courses are gathered from the data warehouse and filtered forunique student counts at each middle school. Total campus enrollmentinformation from the spring semester is used for the calculation.Provide an overview of the process for Timeline for Data Collectiondata collection and analysis, including and Analysistimelines for any related activities suchas staff training and/or calibration,assessment and survey windowsincluding make-up testing and followup surveys (if needed), and dataanalysis.Course enrollment data is gathered in the spring semester and mergedwith course completions at the end of the school year. Student coursefailures are removed, so only completions are included, and the data isfiltered for unique students.

Domain: AcademicsDescribe the processes to ensure thedata is valid, reliable, and auditable,such as practices to encourage andassess representative participation insurveys, procedures for calculatingdata including determination of cutpoints and growth targets, andprotocols for data storage.Describe the scaling process to beused for this component.MethodologyScaling ProcessComponent A1Data is collected centrally by the Department of Evaluation to ensure alldata is gathered consistently. Search results are saved in pdf format forauditing purposes. These results are kept electronically on a districtnetwork server, which is backed up daily. Cut points were determinedbased on methodology from the CaSE process.SCALINGA - 60% or more of unique students completing one or more PreAP,Advanced Math, LOTE100 - ((10*(70-RAW)/(70-60))B – 50-59% of unique students completing one89 - (9*((60 - 1)-RAW)/((60-1) -50))C – 40-49% of unique students completing one79-(9*((50 - 1) - RAW)/((50-1)-40))D – 30-39% of students completing one or more69 - (9*((40 - 1)-RAW)/((40-1)-30))F - 30% or less of students completing one or more59-(29*((30-1) - RAW)/(30 - 1))

Component A2Campus Attendance RatesMiddle School Level50%Good student attendance is the foundational component that mustbe in place for effective instruction to impact ALL students. Inorder to emphasize continuous improvement in campusattendance rates, this component has been included. Future workmay focus on the category of chronic absenteeism, which can bea hidden component contributing to a campus’ overall lowattendance rate, and also viewing attendance data bysubpopulations.Data is collected directly from the student information system forthe overall ADA attendance rate for each campus.Data is collected after the processes for day totals are run at theend of the school year and the final ADA attendance rate iscalculated.

Component A2Attendance data is verified at a number of levels, from the teach

Atascocita Springs Elementary Elementary School Bear Branch Elementary Elementary School Deerwood Elementary Elementary School Eagle Springs Elementary Elementary School Elm Grove Elementary El

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