Retail Prices Of Food And Coal, 1941 : Bulletin Of The .

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U N ITED STATES D EPARTM EN T OF LABO RFrances Perkins, SecretaryB U R E A U O F L A B O R ST A T IST IC SIsador Lubin, Commissioner (on leave)A . F. Hinrichs, Acting Commissioner R etail Prices o f Foodand Coal1941 Prepared byR E TA IL PRICE DIVISIONE T H EL D . H O O V E R , ChiefBulletin J lo. 707U N IT E D S T A T E SG O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G OFFICEW A S H IN G T O N : 1942F or sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, Washington, D . C.Digitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. LouisPrice 10 cents

CONTENTSFood:PageTrends of food prices after the outbreak of the warAnnual average indexes, 1913 to 1941Review of food prices during the year 1941Details by commodity groupsOutstanding changes bv regions andcitiesCoal:Prices in December 1941Review of coal prices during the year 1941:BituminousAnthracitePrices, 1929 to 1941, inclusive11341017182835Letter of TransmittalU nited States D epartment of L abor,B ureau of L abor Statistics,Washington, D. (7., April 17, 191 .The Secretary of L abor:I have the honor to transmit herewith a report presenting indexesof retail costs of food and coal in the United States from 1913 to De cember 1941, together with average retail prices of individual articlesof food and of various kinds and sizes of coal for the year 1941.Previously a review of retail prices for each year was published inthe issue of the printed monthly pamphlet, “ Retail Prices/7 forJanuary of the following year.However, as a measure of wartime economy the Bureau of LaborStatistics discontinued the publication of its printed monthly pam phlets with the December 1941 issue, and substituted therefor mimeo graphed monthly reports. These mimeographed reports have themerit of quick publication, but there remains a widespread demandfor a formal annual review, which might also incorporate any revisionsthat may have become necessary.The prices were collected and the report was prepared by theRetail Price Division of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.A. F. H inrichs, Acting Commissioner.Hon. F rances P erkins,Secretary of Labor.nDigitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Bulletin T o. 707 o f theUnited States Bureau o f Labor StatisticsR etail Prices o f Food and Coal, 1941FOODTrends o f Food Prices A fter the Outbreak of the WarRetail food costs advanced 21.0 percent between August 15, 1939,immediately preceding the outbreak of the European war, and De cember 16, 1941. In August 1939 food costs were relatively lowcompared with 1937 and 1938 levels, due to the existence of plentifulsupplies of nearly all foods at that time. With the outbreak of thewar, in Europe early in September 1939, many housewives, remem bering the skyrocketing prices of most foods during the first WorldW ar, rushed to their grocers with large orders for sugar, navy beans,canned goods, and other foods which could be stored away for futureuse. The sudden change from day-to-day buying to quantity buyingsoon resulted in the depletion of stocks of certain foods in the handsof retail merchants and wholesalers, and speculation contributed to arising market which caused the average retail cost of food in largecities to increase 5 percent between August 15 and September 19.Sugar prices jumped 25 percent. This panicky situation lasted foronly a short time, however, as assurance of plentiful supplies wasgiven to the public. The success of measures taken by the Govern ment and private organizations to avert a further increase in priceswas reflected in a substantial price decline by mid-October and thereturn of prices by January 1940 to levels only slightly higher thanthose which existed in August 1939.During the year 1940 and the first quarter of 1941, food pricesadvanced moderately with the usual seasonal fluctuations. In April1941, however, after the enactment of the Lend-Lease Act, whichopened the way for exports of foodstuffs in large quantities, and theinauguration of an agricultural policy designed to support farm pricesof pork, dairy products, eggs, and poultry, retail prices of food beganto advance rapidly, rising 14.9 percent during the 9-month periodbetween March 18, 1941, and December 16, 1941. Increased in dustrial activity, with larger pay rolls, Government purchases underthe Lend-Lease Act, speculative activities, and inadequate transpor tation were also responsible for these price advances.Annual Average IndexesTable 1 and the accompanying chart show the trend of costs of allfoods at retail for the period from January 1913 to December 1941.Digitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis1

RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD AND COAL, 1941Digitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

FOODT a ble 1 .— Indexes o f retail food costs in 51 large cities combined, by years from1913 to 1941) and by months, January 1941 to December 1941 , inclusive[1935- 39 100]All foodsindexYear1013101410 11 0 1 fi1017101310101 0 9 ft1091109210931094109K1 0 9 ft1927.YearAll 7103310301 0 4 ft1041.Year and monthAll 106.7108.097.895.296.6105.5September. 998.4tmMR eview o f Food Prices During the Year 1941Food costs averaged 9.2 percent higher in 1941 than in 1940, and8.2 percent above the 1939 average level. The index for all foods forthe year 1941 was 105.5 percent of the 1935-39 average. After slightincreases during the first 3 months of 1941, food costs rose at an aver age rate of about 1.5 percent per month during the remainder of theyear up to December 1941, when seasonal declines for some foodsslowed the advance. Increases of more than 50 percent were reportedfor lard, shortening in cartons, and eggs, between mid-March andmid-December. Red salmon rose about 40 percent during thisperiod as the Government purchased about half of the total pack forthe armed forces and for shipment abroad. Large Government pur chases were also partly responsible for substantial advances in pricesof canned peaches, navy beans, cheese, canned pink salmon, evaporatedmilk, and canned green beans. Coffee prices advanced 30 percentfrom the unusually low level of January 1941. Trade agreementswere concluded during the year providing for the payment of higherprices for green coffee in the coffee-producing countries. Prices ofshortening in tin or similar containers and oleomargarine were about25 percent higher in December than in March following much largergeneral advances in wholesale prices of fats and oils of ail kinds. Im portant increases were also reported for pork products, flour, rice,sugar, canned tomatoes, and salad dressing. Sugar prices advanced16.5 percent between mid-March and mid-December, reflecting theincreased use of sugar for various purposes, one of the more importantof which was the manufacture of industrial alcohol. The sugar situa tion became critical by mid-December with the threatened loss ofsupplies from the Pacific area. Many retail stores began early tovoluntarily limit sales to 2, 5, or 10 pounds per customer and thepractice of restricting sales was later adopted throughout the country.Prices of bread and milk, two of the most important commoditiesin the food budgets of moderate-income families, advanced betweenmid-March and mid-December of last year in nearly every city coveredby the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ survey. Increases m milk pricesDigitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

4RETAIL PRICES OP FOOD AND COAL, 19 41ranged from 1 to 4 cents per quart while bread prices advancedgenerally about 1 cent per loaf.Details by Commodity GroupsCereals and bakery 'products.— Average costs of cereals and bakeryproducts during the year 1941 showed less increase, with an advanceof 1.1 percent over 1940 average levels, than any other major groupof foodstuffs. Prices of bread, which represents over 40 percent of theaverage workingman’s expenditures for products in this group,changed very little during the first 7 months of the year, but betweenmid-July and mid-August advanced in 30 of the 51 cities coveredby the Bureau’s survey. This rise was general throughout the NewEngland, Middle Atlantic, and North Central States. The increasefor the most part was in the form of a 1-cent per loaf advance withno reduction in the size of the loaf. In a few cities, however, the priceper loaf remained the same, but the loaf was reduced in size. Therewere additional increases for bread during September and the re maining months of the year, with declines occurring only in Chicago,Dallas, and Pittsburgh, among the cities for which reports are avail able. Flour prices advanced earlier than bread and rose 19 percentbetween mid-April and mid-December. Other commodities in thecereals and bakery-products group also advanced moderately.Meats.— Meat costs averaged 12 percent higher in 1941 than in1940 largely because of a considerable advance in prices of porkproducts over the relatively low levels which prevailed during theearly months of 1940, when retail prices of pork were lower than at anytime since the spring of 1935. Between mid-March and mid-Septem ber 1941, average prices of pork rose 28 percent. Beef prices were 7percent higher in 1941 than in 1940 in spite of larger supplies of cattlebeing marketed. Contrary to their usual seasonal trend, pricesdeclined gradually from January through June but advanced sharplybetween mid-June and mid-September. As supplies began to appearon the market in increasing volume during the early fall, prices moveddownward. A decline amounting to 3.6 percent between mid-Septem ber and mid-November was followed by an advance of more than 2percent by mid-December, reflecting a strengthening demand. Lambprices averaged 7 percent higher in 1941 than in 1940 as the higherprices paid to farmers were reflected in the retail markets. Becauseof the rising price of wool, more lambs were held on farms for wool growing purposes, reducing the number of lambs marketed for slaugh ter. Roasting chickens and fresh and frozen fish were up more than7 percent during the year. An advance of 13 percent in fish pricesoccurred between mid-August and mid-December, as supplies of cer tain varieties were reduced on account of the smaller number ofvessels available for fishing. Salmon prices advanced steadily duringthe year as a result of the large purchases of red salmon (45 percentof the total pack) by the Government. In mid-December, cannedred salmon was 40 percent higher than in mid-January, and pinksalmon was 27 percent higher, notwithstanding the unusually heavycatch.Digitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

FOOD5Dairy products.— Prices of dairy products averaged 10.5 percenthigher in 1941 than in 1940 as large quantities of cheese and evap orated milk were purchased by the Government for shipment abroadand more fresh milk was diverted from regular distribution channelsfor use in the production of cheese and canned milk. This diversionof fresh milk to other than retail channels, together with increasedcosts of production and distribution resulted in advances in the priceof milk during the year in nearly every city covered by the Bureau’ssurvey, with increases ranging from 1 to 4 cents per quart. Cheeseprices in 1941 were 16 percent above the 1940 average. Evaporatedmilk was 11.4 percent and butter 14 percent higher, although butterproduction during the latter part of 1941 was greater than usual,with the result that the price declined contraseasonally. Therewere unusually large stocks of butter on hand on January 1, 1942.Eggs.— The average retail price of eggs for the year 1941 was 20percent higher than the average for 1940 notwithstanding increasedegg production during the year. In the first quarter of the year, eggprices were lower than for the same period of 1940. Beginning inApril, however, they advanced rapidly, ranging from 18 to 34 percentabove average prices for the corresponding months of the previous year.The average price of eggs rose from 29 cents per dozen in March1941 to 52 cents per dozen in November in a greater-than-seasonaladvance, and declined 3 cents per dozen between mid-November andmid-December, as is usual for that time of the year.Fresh fruits and vegetables.—For fruits and vegetables, average costsduring 1941 were 7 percent above the 1940 average due in part toshort supplies resulting from bad weather conditions during the grow ing season for some crops. There were the customary seasonalvariations during the year. Cabbage sold on the average at prices27 percent above those of 1940. Prices of green beans, lettuce,onions, spinach, and bananas ranged from 11 to 15 percent higher,while carrots, sweetpotatoes, oranges, and apples were from 4 to 7percent higher. The average price of potatoes was the same for 1941as for 1940, although potato prices began to advance at the end ofthe year because of the short 1941 crop. For canned and dried fruitsand vegetables, prices averaged about 6 percent higher in 1941 thanin 1940 with the advances for canned peaches, corn, green beans,tomatoes, and navy beans ranging from 7 to 12 percent.Fats and oils.— Costs of fats and oils in retail stores averaged 14percent higher in 1941 than in 1940. The greatest increase was forlard which went up 9.3 cents per pound in January 1941 to 15.2 centsin mid-December. On the average, lard prices in 1941 were 35 percenthigher than the low level which prevailed in 1940. Prices of shorten ing in cartons averaged 23 percent higher and shortening in othercontainers followed the same general price trend except that increaseswere smaller. Prices of oleomargarine advanced 27 percent duringthe year.Table 2 presents indexes of retail costs of foods, by commoditygroups, 1923 to December 1941, and the accompanying chart showstrends, by commodity groups, January 1929 to December 1941.Table 3 gives average retail prices of 65 foods in 51 cities combined,by months in 1941.Digitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

6RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD AND COAL, 1 9 4 1RETAIL COST OF FOODAVERAGE FOR SI LARGE CITIESUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABORBUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICSDigitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

7FOODT a ble 2 *— Indexes of retail costs of food in 51 large cities combined,1 by commoditygroups, 1928-41, inclusive[1935-39 100]Y ea r, m on th , an d d a yA llfo o d sF r u it s a n d v e g e t a b le sC e rea lsF a tsD a ir yandB ev andb a k M e a ts p r o d E g g sera gesu ctso ilseryT o ta l F resh C a n n ed D rie dprod u ctsSugarBY YEARS1923. .1924. - . .1925. .1926.1927. .124 .0122 .8132.9137.4132.31 05 .510 7 .2116.0115.7113.31 01 .210 2 .4111.3117.8116.0129 .4124.1128 .2127.4130 .7136.1139.0151.2141.7133.2169 .5159.5185.1210 .8183.8173 .6162.7193 .52 2 6 .2194.41 24 .812 8 .2132.3122 .91 20 .8175.4159 .6159.0152.4145.9131 .5147 .6170.3170.4163.31 2 6 .2134.1149.1145 .0132.8175.4159.1124.61 2 0 .0127 .219 2 8 . -1929. - -----------------------1930. - .—1 9 3 1 .------------- --------------------1932.—13 0 .8132.5126 .0103.98 6 .5110.1107 .6104.39 1 .48 2 .6123.1127.1119.1101.17 9 .3131 .4131.0121.0102 .88 4 .9137.3143.8121.49 5 .68 2 .3161.4169.0177.5125.7103.5166 .5173.5185.7128.7105 .91 2 0 .6124 .3118.6103 .391.1153 .9171.0158.7118 .79 1 .216 5 .2164 .8143.41 24 .6112.6128.3127 .2119 .29 6 .07 1 .1123.1114.3107 .49 9 .18 9 .61933 - . 8 4 .11934. 9 3 .71935 100.41936 - 101.31937.- ---------- --------------- 105.38 4 .79 8 .3101.8100 .7103.36 8 .97 8 .99 9 .99 8 .9105.88 2 .89 0 .99 7 .5101 .6105.47 7 .98 8 .6104 .2103.3101.2113.8119.19 9 .7104 .8107.9118 .9122.39 8 .81 0 6 .21 08 .68 7 .9103 .9106 .21 00 .91 03 .28 8 .4101.1100 .89 6 .6116 .0102 .4107 .6104 .09 9 .4103 .66 6 .47 6 .4110 .3102.8105 .89 4 .39 7 .9100 .79 9 .6101 .21938. . 9 7 .81939------- ---------------------------- 9 5 .21940------- --------------------------- 9 6 .61941—.— . 105.59 9 .89 4 .59 6 .89 7 .99 8 .99 6 .69 5 .8107 .59 9 .69 5 .9101 .4112 .010 0 .39 1 .09 3 .8112 .29 3 .29 4 .59 6 .5103 .29 2 .195 .19 7 .310 4 .29 7 .49 2 .39 2 .49 7 .99 3 .39 3 .310 0 .6106 .79 7 .79 5 .59 2 .5101.59 3 .58 7 .78 2 .29 4 .09 7 .9100 .69 6 .8106 .4B Y P R I C E - R E P O R T I N G P E R I O D S F O R 1941J a n . 14------- ---------------------- 9 7 .89 7 .9F e b . 18 9 8 .4M a r . 18. .A p r . 15----------------------------- 100 .6M a y 1 3 - - ------------------------- 102.1105.9J u n e 17. . —9 4 .99 5 .095 .19 5 .29 5 .49 5 .9101.1102.5102.5103 .5104 .2106.8105.1104 .4104 .6106 .3107 .7109 .79 7 .48 5 .08 3 .09 2 .09 4 .3104.49 3 .39 5 .697 .1100 .6103.5112.19 3 .49 6 .398.11 02 .5105.8116.59 1 .49 1 .89 2 .59 3 .19 4 .29 6 .29 9 .69 9 .59 9 .3100 .0102.7105.19 0 .99 1 .59 3 .59 5 .09 6 .19 8 .78 0 .381. i8 1 .385 .18 8 .09 2 .59 5 .39 6 .09 8 .11 04 .6106 .9107.4106.7108.0110.7111.6113.1113.19 6 .29 9 .0100 .9102 .2102 .2102 .5108.7111.2115.5112 .9110.4111.1112.3114.5118.5119 .9120.912 0 .5114.7120 .7132.9137.3146.1138.1107.0103.4100 .5104.0110.3110.5109 .3103 .89 9 .4103.5111 .2111.09 7 .91 00 .2102 .5103.7105 .2106.3106.5109.1111.0112.7116.2118.3101.4103.8109 .2111.0112.9114.1'9 6 .69 9 .2103.0105.6106.7108.5107 .8109 .0111.8112.5112.9114 .4J u l y 15. —A u g . 1 2 ----------------------------S e p t . 1 6 - . - ---------------------O c t . 14. .N o v . 18---------------------------D e c . 16-------- ---------------------1 Aggregate costs in each city, weighted to represent total purchases of families of wage earners and lowersalaried workers, have been combined with the use of population weights. Comparable indexes for theyears 1923-34 have been computed by converting indexes from the 1923-25 base to the 1935-39 base.4 5 7 4 1 6 — 42--------2Digitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

T able3 .— Average retail prices of 65 foods in 51 large cities combined , by months in 1941ArticleDigitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. LouisJan. .79.49.625.815. .451.432.319.738.436.052. 538.2Feb. 18 Mar. 18 Apr. 15 May 13 June 17 July 15 Aug. 12 Sept. 16Oct. 14 Nov. 18 Dec. .714.343.433.814.543.334.214.742.334.514.8RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD AND COAL, 1941Cereals and bakery products:Cereals:Flour, wheat. .10 pounds.Macaroni. . pound.Wheat cereal1 .28-ounce package.Corn flakes 8-ounce package.Corn meal. . pound.R ice 1doRolled oats 1 doBakery products:Bread, white d o .Bread, whole-wheat. d o .Bread, rye . . .do . . .Vanilla cookiesdoSoda crackers---------------- .d o .Meats:Beef:.d o . .Round steakRib roast. . — doChuck roast do. .Veal:Cutlets .d o .—Pork:Chops.Bacon, sliced . . doHam, sliced1 . .doHam, w h ole do—Salt pork do—Lamb:Leg. .- doRib chops doPoultry:Roasting chickens. .d oFish: 2Salmon, pink. .16-ounce can.Salmon, red 1. . . .d o .—Dairy products:Butter. . pound.Cheese. doMilk, fresh (delivered).1941Aver age fortheyear1941

1 Not included in index.Digitized for FRASERhttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/Federal Reserve Bank of St. 25.95.89.74.15.310.06.941.87.06.59.1 . .537.58 613.69.210.911.813.69.411.111.813.79.621.222.08 60.614.113.561.414.113.621.62 Costs of fresh and/or frozen fish are included in index, but average prices are not computed.FOODMilk,fresh (store) . . doMilk, fresh (delivered and store) l. d o .Milk, evaporated 14J4-ounce can.Eggs.------ -------------------------------------- .dozen.Fruits and vegetables:Fresh:Apples-----pound.Bananas------- d o .Oranges----- dozen.Grapefruit1------- each .Beans, green— poundCabbage.do—Carrotsbunch.Lettuce i------- head—Onions-----poundPotatoes16 pounds.Spinach-----pound.Sweetpotatoes.------- doCanned:Peaches .N o. 2H can.Pineappledo.Grapefruit ju ice1-No. 2 can.Beans, green i------- d o .Cornd o .Peas------- d o .Tomatoes. . . d o. .Dried:Prunespound—Navy beans.d o —Beverages:Coffee----------d o .Tea ,--M pound.Cocoa18-ounce can.Fats and oils:L ard.pound. .Shortening, other than lard:In cartons.d o .In other containers. . .—doSalad dressing.—p in tOleomargarinepound—Peanut butter.- d oSugar and sweets:Sugar. . . .10 pounds.Corn sirup1. . 24-ounce can.Molasses1. . .18-ounce can.8 Priced first time on Oct. 14,1941.CO

10RETAIL PRICES OP FOOD AND COAL, 1941Outstanding Changes b y R egions and CitiesThe average cost of food for 1941 was higher than for 1940 in all 51cities included in this survey. The largest increases were reportedfor Norfolk (13.1 percent), Mobile (13.0 percent), and Portland, Oreg.(12.4 percent); while the smallest increases occurred in Omaha and inManchester, N. H. (each 7.0 percent), Newark (7.2 percent), andBoston (7.3 percent).Index numbers of the retail cost of food by cities are presented intable 4 for the year and for each month of 1941.T a b l e 4 .— Indexes of the average retail cost of all foods, by cities, by months in 1941 1[1935-39 100]1941Aver ageforRegion and citythe Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.1312 16 14 18 1618 I 1815year 1417151941i 98T4102.197.9100.6105.9106.7ToO97.8110.7 111.6 113.1 T IOUnited States. 105.5 New England:Boston----------------------------- 103.2 95.2 96. 2! 96.1 98.3 99.5 102.6 104.7 107.3 108.4 108.5 111.5 110.1Bridgeport 104.9 96. 5 96.4 96.8 100.6 102.3 106.6 107.6 108.4 110.1 109.9 111.5 111.9Fall River 104.9 97.5 98.4 98.4 100.4 102.2 106.0 107. 5 107.1 109.5 110.1 111.7 110.5Manchester, N. H 104.8 96.6 96.7 97.2 99.5 101.3 104.6 107.1 108.4 110.4 110.9 112.8 111.7New Haven 103.9 95.7 96.1 96.3 99.8 101.4 105.8 105.9 107.2 108.5 108.3 110.5 111.1Portland, Maine 103.8 295.3 296.0 2 95.9 98.6 100.7 104.2 106.3 107.9 109.2 109.3 111.2 110.7Providence-. 104.6 96.3 97.3 97.0 99.2 101.1 104. 5 107.0 108.9 110.8 110.9 112.1 110.2Middle Atlantic:Buffalo 108.5 100. 2 100.3 100.8 103.2 106.0 110.1 110.8 111.8 114.1 114.4 115.2 115.4Newark. . 105.7 98.8 100. 2 : 99.2 101.9; 102.7 106.9 106.1 108.0 109.4 111.2 111.9 112.1New York. 106.0 99.51100.4 99.8i101.61102.3 106.7 107.0 107.8 109.8 111.4 113.1 112.5Philadelphia 102.4 95.0! 94.9i1 95.2 ! 97.0 100.1 103.3 103.3 104.7 107.5 109.0 108.7 109.8Pittsburgh 106.2 98.0i 97.5 1 98.51101.1 103.6 107.3 108.7 109.0 111.9 111.8 112.9 113.7Rochester 106.9 99.9 99.8 100.1 103.1 105.0 108.6 109.7 110.2 111.1 111.1 112.1 112.2Scranton 104.9 97.5 97.7 97.6 100.4 102.9 105.2 106.8 108.8 110.3 109.8 109.5 111.8East North Central:Chicago . . 106. 2 98.2 97.9 98.41100. 5 101.9 105.8 107. 5 108.1 114.0 113.5 114.8 113.2Cincinnati. . 105.0 96. 5 96.5 97. 6; 100.1 100.9 104.8 104.8 109.0 110.0 112.6 114.3 112.7Cleveland 107.7 99.2 99.3 100.31102.1 103.4 107.8 108.7 112.1 114.1 114.0 116.4 115.0Columbus, Ohio. 102.2 93.4 ! 93 2 94.0 96.9 98.6 102.9 104.5 104.4 107.6 109.2 110.4 111.1104.9 97.0 97l2 98.4 101.3 100.7 107.0 107.2 107.1 108.9 111.1 112.0 111.4DetroitIndianapolis 106.3 98.2 97.9 98.8 101.1 103. 5 106.5 106.9 108.5 111.3 112.6 114.9 115.2Milwaukee 104. 0 95.9 95.4 96.3 99.2 101.1 106.5 106.8 107.1 109.2 109. 2 111.3 110.5Peoria 108.2 99.0 99.4 100.3 103. 5 104.0 108.2 110.2 111.0 115.2 114.7 116.1 116.7Springfield, 111 105.6 96.2 96.5 97.0 100.3 100.8 105.6 106.7 107.4 111.9 112.8 115.7 115.8West North Central:Kansas City. 101.2 92.4 93.6 94.8 97.4 97.9 101.3 101.2 101.8 107.3 107.1 109.6 109.7Minneapolis. 106.6 99.0 100. 5 100.2 101.5 103.1 107.4 108.2 110.0 112.0 112.5 112.9 111.9Omaha. . . . 103.7 97.9 97.3 97.4 100.4 101.9 104.6 103.4 105.7 108.2 108.0 109.4 110.5St. Louis. . 107. 5 99.2 99. 3 99.5 101.4 102.4 107.2 108. 5 109.4 114,5 114.6 117.0 117.5St. Paul. . 104.1 98.6 98. 6 98.0 99.6 101. 5 104.3 103.9 104.7 108.2 109.3 111. 4 111.5South Atlantic:Atlanta. . . 103.8 94.3 95.8 96.7 99.7 99.0 103.4 105.2 107.0 110.0 112.2 111.1 111.1Baltimore .107. 0 97.9 98.3 99.1 101. 5 103.7 108. 7 106.6 109.6 113.1 113.6 114.3 116.1Charleston, S. C 104. 7 95.9 95.9 96.1 98. 2 100.0 103.5 107.6 107.9 111.0 112.6 113.1 115.1Jacksonville 108.6 98.8 99.2 99.0 101.7 103.1 107.6 111.4 113.6 114.6 117.5 119.2 117.3Norfolk. 107.4 95.8 99.5 100.6 102.1 102.1 107.0 108.4 110.8 113.1 115.2 116.7 117.6Richmond.

Retail Prices o f Food and Coal, 1941 FOOD. Trends of Food Prices After the Outbreak of the War. Retail food costs advanced 21.0 percent between August 15, 1939, immediately preceding the outbreak of the European war, and De cembe