Primary Sources In Lesson Planning Unit Outline

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Primary Sources in Lesson PlanningUnit OutlineCreated by: Aubrey SmithSt. Frances of Rome Schoolth6 grade Language Arts & Social StudiesHistorical Fiction Genre Study: Esperanza RisingUnit OverviewThis Historical Fiction genre study is based around the novel, Esperanza Rising, by Pam MunozRyan and incorporates Primary Sources in order to create a context for the historical setting inwhich the book was written. The book begins in 1924 in Aguascalientes, Mexico (prior to theGreat Depression). The novel depicts Esperanza’s immigration to Los Angeles, California,where her family moves into the migrant farm worker camps and struggles to earn a living.Throughout the unit, the class will examine the following historical events using primary sourcedocuments: The Mexican Revolution: 1910-1920 Mexican Immigration to the United States: post Revolution – 1920’s – 1940’s Cesar Chavez and the formation of the UFW (United Farm Workers): 1960’sA unit overview has been provided, depicting the sequence of the lessons and the integration ofprimary sources. The primary sources within this unit are being used primarily to buildbackground knowledge about the time period in which the novel is taking place and create acontext for the conflicts within the story. Detailed, individual plans for the lessons using primarysources have also been provided within this unit outline.The following methods/strategies will be used throughout the unit:Literature Circles: Students will be reading this novel within Literature Circles. Inliterature circles, students break into small groups during reading time to discuss a pieceof literature in depth. Discussions are student lead and guided by students' response towhat they have read. I prefer to have students come to class everyday with their owndiscussion questions pertaining to what they have read. This may include events andcharacters in the book, the author's craft, or personal experiences related to the story. Inaddition, students usually take on a “role” each day. These roles may include DiscussionDirector, Predictor, Visualizer or Connector (See Appendix A). Discussion Directorsthen record their discussion on a group sheet each day (See Appendix B). Followingtheir discussions, students begin reading the next set of chapters as a group.Admit Slips: On some occasions, students will be assigned “Admit Slips” for homework.These are short, manageable expository texts (no longer than a page long) that preparestudents for what they will be learning in class the following day. Admit slips are meant toactivate a reader’s schema and add background knowledge prior to introducing newcontent. The admit slip should include prompts 2 or 3 prompts asking students to respondto the reading. Admit slips also provide a good opportunity for students to formulatequestions and come to class ready to inquire about new content.

Primary SourcesLesson 1: Pre-reading The Mexican Revolution Broadside: 1904 glorias de México! Porfirio Díaz y Ramón Corral“1904 glorias de México! Porfirio Díaz y Ramón Corral electos por el voto unánime del pueblo para presidentey vice-presidente de la República Mexicana." Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. AntonioVanegas Arroyo (Firm), 1904. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/99615821 Newspaper: Valentine Democrat, April 4, 1912"Bandit is a Hero." Chronicling America, Library of Congress. Valentine Democrat, April 4, 1912. 780/1912-04-04/ed-1/seq-3/ Photo: Diaz Jr., P. Diaz: "Diaz Jr., P. Diaz." Prints and Photographs, Library of Congress. Bain News Service, Circa 1910-1915. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ggb2004009392 ;. Photo: Wounded man and insurrecto with rifle along brick wall "Wounded man and insurrectowith rifle along brick wall." Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Scott Photo Co., Circa 1911.Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/93514463 . Painting: Emiliano Zapata, full, standing, with horseRivera, Diego. "Emiliano Zapata, full, standing, with horse." Prints and Photographs Division, Library ofCongress. Valentine Democrat, 1931. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2007678774 .Lesson 5: Pre-reading Mexican Immigration to the U.S. 1920’s-1940’s Photo 1: Inspecting a freight train from Mexico for smuggled immigrants. El Paso, TexasLange, Dorothea. "Inspecting a freight train from Mexico for smuggled immigrants. El Paso, Texas." Prints andPhotographs Division, Library of Congress. N.p., 1938. Web. mig/mexican4.html . Photo 2: Mexicans entering the United States. United States immigration station, ElPaso, TexasLange, Dorothea. "Mexicans entering the United States. United States immigration station, El Paso, Texas."Prints and Photographs Division. Library of Congress, 1941. Web. mig/mexican4.html . Photo 3: Group of children posing under sign that reads "U.S. Department of AgricultureFarm Security Administration Farm Workers Community"Hemmig, Robert. "Group of children posing under sign that reads "U.S. Department of Agriculture FarmSecurity Administration Farm Workers Community"." Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd andRobert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection. Library of Congress, 1941. Web. :@field(DOCID @lit(p014)) .Lesson 8: Living and working conditions in FSA camps in California. Early 1940’s Interview: Interview about FSA camp governance, camp work, non-FSA migrant camps,labor issues, attitude toward "Okies."Flores, Jose. "Interview about FSA camp governance, camp work, non-FSA migrant camps, labor issues,attitude toward "Okies."." Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin MigrantWorker Collection, 1940-1941. Library of Congress, Circa 1940. Web. 3 Aug 2010. temp/ ammem QXKj:: .

Lesson 9: Living & working conditions in FSA camps in California.1930’s -1940’sCesar Chavez and the UFW 1960’s-1970’s Poster: “Boycott Lettuce and Grapes”Chicago Women's Graphics Collective. "Boycott Lettuce & Grapes." Circa 1978. Printsand Photographs Division, Library of Congress.School Demographics St. Frances of Rome School is a K-8 Catholic School located on the West Side of Chicago. The school is fairly small, with enrollment ranging from 250 – 300 students each year. The student population is 80% Hispanic and over 50% of students speak a foreign languagefluently. The 6th grade classroom in which this unit will be taught is typically 23-25 students.Prior Knowledge This unit would have been taught following a unit on the Spanish conquest of Mexico and theMexican War of Independence. Students would have learned about the development of aclass system, beginning under Spanish rule and continuing after the War of Independence, inwhich most of the land was owned by an elite ruling class. Students would have an understanding of Literature Circles and their roles within theirgroups. (This should be taught and modeled through mini-lessons prior to this unit.)Overall ObjectivesStudents will: examine a collection of primary source documents and infer the major causes of theMexican Revolution. draw conclusions about the social & emotional climate of Mexico following the MexicanRevolution. examine a collection of primary source photographs and make observations andinferences about the immigrant experience. draw conclusions about the difficulties faced by immigrants during the Great Depression. write a diary entry describing the immigrant experience from the main character’sperspective. combine background knowledge with information gained from a farm worker interview inorder to answer questions concerning migrant camps. discuss and formulate questions surrounding the struggles of farm workers during theDepression Era.

Compare historical events with events in Esperanza Rising (A historical fiction novel) Synthesize observations of a primary source (poster) with background knowledge. evaluate the options of farm workers and identify possible consequences of boycotts.Investigative Questions1. How/Why do our experiences change us and cause us to grow? (Characterdevelopment)2. How can we effectively bring about change when faced with injustice in our society?Time Required3 Weeks (Fifteen 45 min - 1 hour class periods)Recommended Grade Range5th – 6th gradeSubjectLanguage Arts & Social Studies (Integrated Unit)StandardsReadingSTATE GOAL 1: Read with understanding and fluency.B. Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency. 1.B.2a Establish purposes for reading; survey materials; ask questions; makepredictions; connect, clarify and extend ideas. 1.B.4a Preview reading materials, clarify meaning, analyze overall themes andcoherence, and relate reading with information from other sources. 1.B.3b Identify text structure and create a visual representation (e.g., graphicorganizer, outline, drawing) to use while reading.C. Comprehend a broad range of reading materials. 1.C.3a Use information to form, explain and support questions and predictions. 1.C.3d Summarize and make generalizations from content and relate them to thepurpose of the material.LiteratureSTATE GOAL 2: Read and understand literature representative of various societies, erasand ideas.A. Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning. 2.A.3b Describe how the development of theme, character, plot and setting contributeto the overall impact of a piece of literature.

B. Read and interpret a variety of literary works. 2.B.3a Respond to literary material from personal, creative and critical points of view. 2.B.3b Compare and contrast common literary themes across various societies anderas. 2.B.3c Analyze how characters in literature deal with conflict, solve problems andrelate to real-life situations.HistorySTATE GOAL 16: Understand events, trends, individuals and movements shaping thehistory of Illinois, the United States and other nations.A. Apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation. 16.A.3b Make inferences about historical events and eras using historical maps andother historical sources. 16.A.2c Ask questions and seek answers by collecting and analyzing data from historicdocuments, images and other literary and non-literary sources.C. Understand the development of economic systems. 16.C.2c (US) Describe significant economic events including industrialization,immigration, the Great Depression, the shift to a service economy and the rise oftechnology that influenced history from the industrial development era to the present. 16.C.3b (US) Explain relationships among the American economy and slavery,immigration, industrialization, labor and urbanization, 1700-present.Social SystemsSTATE GOAL 18: Understand social systems, with an emphasis on the United States.C. Understand how social systems form and develop over time. 18.C.3b Explain how diverse groups have contributed to U.S. social systems over time.EconomicsSTATE GOAL 15: Understand economic systems, with an emphasis on the UnitedStates.A. Understand how different economic systems operate in the exchange, production, distributionand consumption of goods and services. 15.A.3b Explain the relationship between productivity and wages. 15.B.3b Explain the effects of choice and competition on individuals and the economyas a whole.

Materials Used Esperanza Rising, by Pam Munoz Ryan (novel) Primary source documents from The Library of Congress website Primary source analysis worksheets & organizersGeneral Procedure1. Students will complete a pre-reading activity in which they will examinedocuments/photos from the Mexican Revolution. Students will complete a KWL chart,which they will add to throughout the unit.2. For homework, students will complete an Admit Slip detailing a brief history of theMexican Revolution & answer 3 questions in response to the reading.3. Students will read a brief biography about Emiliano Zapata and formulate questionsbased on their reading. Students will then begin a parallel timeline, chronicling historicalevents, and parallel events occurring in Esperanza Rising. Students will add to thistimeline as they read.4. Students will begin reading Esperanza Rising in Literature Circles.5. Students will be given their first set of vocabulary and complete a word sort. (They willreceive two sets of vocabulary, one at the beginning and middle of the unit in order tosupport their reading.-See Appendix C, D & E)6. A reading mini-lesson will be given on the elements of Historical Fiction.7. Before reading Chapter 6, students will observe 3 pictures depicting the Mexicanimmigrant experience & complete a photographic analysis worksheet.8. Students will write a diary entry from Esperanza’s perspective detailing her experience onthe way to Los Angeles.9. While reading Chapter 7, students will chart Esperanza’s journey on a map, labelingcities, states & countries, and noting the geography & climate of these regions.10. Students will take their first Quiz & receive their second set of vocabulary words.11. For homework, students will complete an Admit Slip about Cesar Chavez and theformation of the UFW & answer 3 questions in response to the reading.12. Before reading chapter 8, students will listen to an FSA interview with a Mexican farmworker and answer questions about the interview as they listen.13. Before reading chapter 9, students will view the poster “Boycott Lettuce and Grapes” andrespond to a short essay prompt. The class will then discuss the strikes/boycotts and thereasons they took place.

14. As they read chapters 9 & 10, students will discuss the problems that arise in the migrantcamps, and some of the solutions that are proposed in the book. With their groups,students will complete a “Looking at Our Options” organizer and evaluate each optionand its consequences.15. Students will choose the option they think best (the teacher may want to delegate if thesides are substantially unequal) and the class will have a debate: “To Strike or Not toStrike ”16. Following the debate, students must draft a written response to their debate experience,detailing the option they believe to be best. Students should provide reasons andexamples to support their choice.17. After completing the novel, students will take a final quiz.18. As a final evaluation, students will complete a venn diagram comparing the lives offarmers in Mexico and farmers in California in the 1930’s & 1940’s. Students will use thisvenn diagram to write a letter to Abuelita from Esperanza’s perspective, discussing thechanges that have taken place in her own life since moving from Aguascalientes toCalifornia.Evaluation/Assessments “Mission Impossible” Primary Source Analysis Worksheet (Mexican Revolution)KWL Chart (Continuous)Admit Slip QuestionsImmigration Photo Analysis WorksheetEsperanza’s Diary entry rubricFSA Interview WorksheetDBQ Worksheet (Boycott Poster)“Looking at our Options” organizer (Strike Debate)Strike Debate Response PaperAguascalientes/California Venn Diagram & Esperanza’s Letter Home

*Social Science*ScienceThis unit covers the 1920’s – 1940’s in bothMexico & the U.S. The unit specifically focuses onthe lives of Mexican farm workers & the reasonsfor immigration to the U.S. during this timeperiod. It also examines the struggle ofimmigrant farm workers to improve workingconditions and secure fair wages in the face ofboth an economic depression and racialprejudices.*Math*Language ArtsThis unit explores the lives of farm workersduring the Great Depression through the use of ahistorical fiction novel, Esperanza Rising. Asstudents read this novel in Literature Circles,they will be making connections between eventsin the book & the historical time period.Through the use of Literature Circles, this unitalso includes multiple opportunities for studentsto write about their reactions to their readingexperience.Lastly, this unit provides students with theopportunity to write from the perspective ofcharacters in the book & reflect on hen creating Literature Circle groups, theteacher may consider scaffolding the groups sothat struggling readers are placed within agroup of students who can support theirreading.Additional extension activities, researchchallenges and discussion/ writing prompts canbe given to gifted students in order to provide anextra challenge.In addition, after observing groupdiscussions/reading, the teacher will most likelyneed to spend more time with certain groupsthan others, supporting discussions & guidingreading groups.

Unit OverviewEsperanza Rising: Historical Fiction Genre StudyMondayPRE‐READING1. Mission Possible2. Discuss thoughts& predictions3. Create KWL4. HW–Admit Slip 1TuesdayPRE‐READING1. Add to KWL2. Read Biographyof EmilianoZapata3. Questions Game4. Return to KWL5. Begin paralleltimeline6. Read AloudPrologue & Ch 1WednesdayThursdayFriday1. Vocab Set 1 :Word Sort2. LiteratureCircles throughCh 31. Mini‐Lesson:Elements ofHistorical Fiction2. LiteratureCircles throughCh 41. Reaction &Response 3Pictures ofimmigration2. LiteratureCircles throughCh 63. HW – DiaryEntry1. ChartEsperanza’sjourney (Map)2. LiteratureCircles Ch. 71. Quiz 12. Vocab Set 2: List‐Group‐LabelActivity3. HW–Admit slip 21. FSA Interview &Response2. LiteratureCircles throughCh 81. Poster Analysis2. LiteratureCircles throughCh 93. Begin “Lookingat Our Options”organizer1. Complete“Looking at OurOptions”Organizer2. Strike DebatePrep3. LiteratureCircles throughCh. 101. Strike Debate2. Opinion Paper1. LiteratureCircles throughCh. 121. LiteratureCircles throughCh. 13 (FinishNovel)1. Quiz 21. Complete VennDiagram:Farmers inMexico/ Farmersin California.2. Write“Esperanza’sLetter Home”

LESSON 1Lesson 1OverviewPre-ReadingActivityObjectivesTime RequiredGrade Level(s)Topic(s)Format(s) ofprimarysources usedDetailsStudents will build background knowledge by examining and analyzing amanila envelope filled with primary source documents illustrating thecauses of the Mexican Revolution. Following this examination, students willdiscuss their thoughts, observations and questions, eventually completing aKWL chart to document their thinking.Students will: examine a collection of primary source documents and infer themajor causes of the Mexican Revolution. draw conclusions about the social & emotional climate of Mexicofollowing the Mexican Revolution. formulate questions about the Mexican Revolution.45 minutesGrades 5-61900-1920The Mexican Revolution: Causes and Effects Broadside: 1904 glorias de México! Porfirio Díaz y Ramón Corral Newspaper: Valentine Democrat, April 4, 1912 Photo: Diaz Jr., P. Diaz“1904 glorias de México! Porfirio Díaz y Ramón Corral electos por el voto unánime delpueblo para presidente y vice-presidente de la República Mexicana." Prints andPhotographs Division, Library of Congress. Antonio Vanegas Arroyo (Firm), 1904. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/99615821"Bandit is a Hero." Chronicling America, Library of Congress. Valentine Democrat, April 4,1912. Web. 1912-04-04/ed-1/seq-3/: "Diaz Jr., P. Diaz." Prints and Photographs, Library of Congress. Bain News Service,Circa 1910-1915. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ggb2004009392 ;.Photo: Wounded man and insurrecto with rifle along brick wall "Woundedman and insurrecto with rifle along brick wall." Prints and Photographs Division, Library ofCongress. Scott Photo Co., Circa 1911. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/93514463 . Painting: Emiliano Zapata, full, standing, with horseRivera, Diego. "Emiliano Zapata, full, standing, with horse." Prints and PhotographsDivision, Library of Congress. Valentine Democrat, 1931. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2007678774 .StandardsAddressedReadingSTATE GOAL 1: Read with understanding and fluency.B. Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.

1.B.2a Establish purposes for reading; survey materials; askquestions; make predictions; connect, clarify and extend ideas.C. Comprehend a broad range of reading materials. 1.C.3a Use information to form, explain and support questions andpredictions. 1.C.3d Summarize and make generalizations from content andrelate them to the purpose of the material.HistorySTATE GOAL 16: Understand events, trends, individuals andmovements shaping the history of Illinois, the United States and othernations.A. Apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation. 16.A.3b Make inferences about historical events and eras usinghistorical maps and other historical sources. 16.A.2c Ask questions and seek answers by collecting andanalyzing data from historic documents, images and other literaryand non-literary sources.Preparation-MaterialsUsed1.2.3.4.Manilla Envelope containing 5 primary sources“Mission Possible” Analysis WorksheetKWL Chart (2 sided)Admit Slip: Photocopy a brief history of the Mexican htm-ResourcesUsedProcedure(Activity/s)1. Pass out manilla envelopes containing 5 primary source documentsillustrating the causes of the Mexican Revolution to each student.2. Along with this envelope, distribute a “Mission Possible” AnalysisWorksheet.3. Give students 15 minutes to individually examine the documentscontained in their envelopes. As they sort through the documents,students should complete their analysis worksheet.4. After students have examined these primary sources, discuss theirimpressions as a class. For example:a. How did they choose to categorize the sources? Why?b. What observations and/or connections did they make?c. What Inferences/predictions can they make?5. Pass out KWL worksheets. Ask students what background knowledgethey already have, then have them share questions that they have aboutthe Mexican Revolution. What do they want to know? Complete theworksheet together. (The class will return to this KWL chart throughout

the unit. I usually make these KWL charts 2 sided, so that students haveplenty of room to write.)6. Homework: Read brief history of the Mexican Revolution & answer 3questions. The text you choose should be no longer than 1 page andmanageable for all levels of readers in your classroom. Remember, theywill be reading this on their own without support. (Admit Slip 1)Evaluation(Rubric/s) “Mission Impossible” Analysis Worksheet KWL Chart Admit Slip Questions

Mexican President, Porfirio DiazCredit: "Diaz Jr., P. Diaz." Prints and Photographs, Library of Congress. Bain News Service,Circa 1910-1915. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ggb2004009392 ;.

The text in verse extols the social improvements under Díaz's presidency and celebrates his reelection for the eighth term. The office of the vice president was reactivated, and Díaz selectedCorral for this position.Credit: "1904 glorias de México! Porfirio Díaz y Ramón Corral electos por el voto unánime del pueblo para presidente y vice‐presidente de la República Mexicana." Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Antonio Vanegas Arroyo(Firm), 1904. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/99615821

Credit: "Bandit is a Hero." Chronicling America, Library of Congress. Valentine Democrat, April 4, 1912. Web. 1912‐04‐04/ed‐1/seq‐3/A Newspaper article fom the Valentine Democrat ( Valentine, Nebraska) describing Zapata’s role in the Mexican Revolution.

Painting of Emiliano Zapata (date unknown)Credit: Rivera, Diego. "Emiliano Zapata, full, standing, with horse." Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.Valentine Democrat, 1931. Web. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2007678774 .

Photograph of Mexican revolutionaries, one wounded.Credit: " Wo u n d e d m a n a n d i n s u r r e c t o w i t h r i f l e a l o n g b r i c k w a l l . " P r i n t s a n d P h o t o g r a p h sD i v i s i o n , L i b r a r y o f C o n g r e s s . S c o t t P h o t o C o . , C i r c a 1 9 11 . We b . h t t p : / / w w w. l o c . g o v / p i c t u r e s / i t e m / 9 3 5 1 4 4 6 3 .

NameMission Possible!Investigating Primary SourcesWhat types of documents are here?What do you notice about these documents? (Observations)Can you make any predictions or inferences?What questions do you have?

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LESSON 5Lesson 5OverviewPre-ReadingActivity (Ch. 5& 6)ObjectivesTime RequiredGrade Level(s)Topic(s)Format(s) ofprimarysources usedDetailsStudents will build background knowledge by individually examining andanalyzing three different photographs of immigration scenes from the1930’s and 1940’s. They will be given the photographs one at a time, usingeach new photograph to build on their previous predictions and inferences.Following this photo analysis, the class will share what they observed. Theywill then discuss what they know about immigration using the photos, theirown background knowledge, and information from Esperanza Rising.Reading groups will then begin reading chapters 5 and 6.Students will: examine a collection of primary source photographs and makeobservations and inferences. draw conclusions about the difficulties faced by immigrants duringthe Great Depression. formulate questions about immigration. Write a diary entry describing the immigrant experience from themain character’s perspective.60 minutesGrades 5-61920 - 1940Mexican Immigration during the Great Depression. Photo 1: Inspecting a freight train from Mexico for smuggledimmigrants. El Paso, TexasLange, Dorothea. "Inspecting a freight train from Mexico for smuggled immigrants. El Paso,Texas." Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. N.p., 1938. Web. mig/mexican4.html . Photo 2: Mexicans entering the United States. United States immigrationstation, El Paso, TexasLange, Dorothea. "Mexicans entering the United States. United States immigration station,El Paso, Texas." Prints and Photographs Division. Library of Congress, 1941. Web. mig/mexican4.html . Photo 3: Group of children posing under sign that reads "U.S.Department of Agriculture Farm Security Administration Farm WorkersCommunity"Hemmig, Robert. "Group of children posing under sign that reads "U.S. Department ofAgriculture Farm Security Administration Farm Workers Community"." Voices from the DustBowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection. Library ofCongress, 1941. Web. :@field(DOCID @lit(p014)) .StandardsAddressedReadingSTATE GOAL 1: Read with understanding and fluency.

B. Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency. 1.B.2a Establish purposes for reading; survey materials; askquestions; make predictions; connect, clarify and extend ideas.C. Comprehend a broad range of reading materials. 1.C.3a Use information to form, explain and support questions andpredictions. 1.C.3d Summarize and make generalizations from content andrelate them to the purpose of the material.HistorySTATE GOAL 16: Understand events, trends, individuals andmovements shaping the history of Illinois, the United States and othernations.A. Apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation. 16.A.3b Make inferences about historical events and eras usinghistorical maps and other historical sources. 16.A.2c Ask questions and seek answers by collecting andanalyzing data from historic documents, images and other literaryand non-literary sources.C. Understand the development of economic systems. 16.C.2c (US) Describe significant economic events includingindustrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the shift to aservice economy and the rise of technology that influenced historyfrom the industrial development era to the present.Social SystemsSTATE GOAL 18: Understand social systems, with an emphasis onthe United States.C. Understand how social systems form and develop over time. 18.C.3b Explain how diverse groups have contributed to U.S.social systems over ure(Activity/s)5.6.7.8.Three immigration photos from the Library of CongressPhotograph Analysis WorksheetKWL ChartEsperanza Rising novel7. Pass out photo 1 to each student. Give them 5 – 7 minutes to makeobservations and write questions about the photograph on their photoanalysis sheet.8. Follow the same procedure for photos 2 and 3. Give students time tomake observations and formulate questions after passing out eachphoto.9. Ask students to share the observations that they recorded on their photoanalysis sheet.

a. What did they see? What are these photographs showing? Whoare the people in the photos? When were these photos taken?b. What inferences can they make? What conclusions can theydraw?10. After students have shared their thoughts & observations, reveal theorigins and contexts of the photos. (Hopefully, students will haverealized that the photographs are showing the experience of Mexicanimmigrants around the time of the Great Depression. If not, guide themtowards, this conclusion.) As a class discuss the difficulties faced byimmigrants coming to the United States in search of work.11. Have students pull out their KWL charts. As a class, record what weknow, any remaining questions, and anything we have learned throughour discussion. (The class will return to this KWL chart throughout theunit.)12. Students will move into their Literature Circles and begin readingchapters 5 and 6 (Los Melones & Los Cebollas)13. HW – Have students write a diary entry from Esperanza’s perspectiveabout the trip from Aguascalientes to California.Evaluation(Rubric/s) Photo Analysis W

Historical Fiction Genre Study: Esperanza Rising Unit Overview This Historical Fiction genre study is based around the novel, Esperanza Rising, by Pam Munoz Ryan and incorporates Primary Sources in order to create a context for the historical setting in which the book was written. The bo

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The Teaching with Primary Sources Journal Strategies and resources for K-12 classrooms from the Library of Congress Primary Sources and the Common Core State Standards Vol. 5, No. 2, Fall 2012 This issue illustrates how primary sources can support teaching to meet the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Nearly every state in the country

This white paper focuses on how to identify and use primary sources effectively in the classroom to build critical thinking skills. It examines the kinds of primary sources teachers can use to support critical thinking about any subject at any grade level and how primary sources can drive learning that is student-centered and student-directed.

Lesson 5 Giving, Prayer 6:1-15 Lesson 6 Fasting & Treasures in Heaven 6:16-24 Lesson 7 Do Not Worry 6:25-34 Lesson 8 Judging Others 7:1-6 Lesson 9 Ask, Seek, Knock 7:7-12 Lesson 10 The Gates & A Tree and Its Fruit 7:13-23 Lesson 11 Wise & Foolish Builders 7:24-29 Lesson 12 Wrap-up/Review

Unit 1 Lesson 1: A Package for Mrs. Jewls 1 Lesson 2: A Royal Mystery 13 Lesson 3: Off and Running 25 Lesson 4: Double Dutch: A Celebration of Jump Rope, Rhyme, and Sisterhood 37 Lesson 5: Elisa’s Diary 49 Unit 2 Lesson 6: Quest for the Tree Kangaroo 61 Lesson 7: Old Yeller 73 Lesson 8: Everglades Forever:

Welcome to the Geometry Dash Editor Guide! This guide will take you through the editor and its features so you can create your own levels! 1 Table of Contents Lesson 1: Basic Building Techniques 2 Lesson 2: Editing 8 Lesson 3: Deletion 12 Lesson 4: Testing and More 13 Lesson 5: Portals and Other Gameplay Objects 14 Lesson 6: Advanced Building Techniques 19 Lesson 7: Editor Buttons 23 Lesson 8 .

Lesson 19: The English alphabet Lesson 20: Parts of the body Lesson 21: Expressing simple needs Lesson 16: Naming selected countries Lesson 17: Telling where you come from Lesson 18: Giving commands Lesson 13: Seeking and giving information Lesson 14: Expressing likes and dislikes

o Lesson 5: Film and Television Analysis o Lesson 6: Art Analysis o Lesson 7: Annotated Bibliographies o Lesson 8: Literature Reviews o Lesson 9: Reflections o Lesson 10: Scientific or Technical Reports o Lesson 11: Proposals o Lesson 12: Abstracts Section 3: Business Writi

Lesson 1 Conversion of common and decimals fractions 1 Lesson 2 Multiplication and Division by 10, 100, 1 000 7 Lesson 3 Reading Scaled Measurements 9 Lesson 4 Rounding Off 14 Lesson 5 Terminating, Non-terminating and Recurring decimals 16 Lesson 6 Mixed Operations using decimal fractions 18 Lesson 7 Mixed Examples 19 Lesson 8 Costing 26