Hydrologic Conditions Report

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Minnesota Department of Natural ResourcesDivision of Ecological and Water ResourcesHydrologic Conditions ReportAugust 2021Previous reports at: https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/current conditions/hydro conditions.html August 2021 brought some welcome relief to the drought across the central and southern parts of thestate. Precipitation totals were from one to three inches above normal over many places in the south.Parts of northwest Minnesota also saw a surplus of precipitation. Northeast Minnesota in general fellshort of normal. The National Weather Service cooperative observer at La Crescent (far southeasternMinnesota) recorded the highest monthly rainfall total, with 11.85 inches. One of the lower totals wasthe Duluth International Airport with 2.44 inches or 1.29 inches short of normal. In general, the averagestation in the state had around five inches of precipitation. The August 31 U. S. Drought Monitor mapdepicts 8% of the state in the Abnormally Dry category, 23% in the Moderate Drought category, 27% inthe Severe Drought category, 31% in the Extreme Drought category and 7% in the Exceptional Droughtcategory. Beginning with the August 10 Drought Monitor, this was the first time since the inception ofthe U.S. Drought Monitor in 2000 that the Exceptional Drought intensity was reported. The U.S. DroughtMonitor index is a blend of science and subjectivity where drought categories (Moderate, Severe, etc.)are based on several indicators. A majority of stream gages throughout the state used in this report were ranked Below Normal (10-25thpercentile) and Low ( 10th percentile) for August of this year. There was a decrease in the number ofgages ranking lower than normal when compared to last month. 27 watersheds are Low, 16 are BelowNormal, 35 are Normal (25th-75th percentile), and 3 are High ( 90th percentile). One gage did not havedischarge data available because it’s still affected by backwater. Seven of the 20 lakes surveyed in the Lake Level Status map are now showing Low percentiles and one isshowing Below Normal percentiles in August. Eleven of the 20 lakes presented in the Normal percentile.One lake is back to a High percentile in August following rains; two lakes did not report for August. Lakesin Aitkin, Anoka, Becker, Beltrami, Carver, Cook, Crow Wing, Hubbard, Isanti, Meeker, Morrison, OtterTail, Washington and Wright Counties reached their lowest reported lake level in August. Thirty-ninepercent of the statewide reporting lakes were at Low percentiles, with 23% at Below Normal percentiles,when comparing August 2021 lake levels to their entire historic record. Thirty-three percent of thestatewide reporting lakes were still at a Normal percentile, with five percent at High or Above Normalpercentiles. From this statewide group of lakes, 75% are now below their average lake level for the entirehistoric record, while 16% were above their average. For the month of August, 191 of the 333 total groundwater observation wells reported water levelmeasurements. Two percent of reporting wells ranked as High water level ( 90 th percentile). Threepercent of wells ranked Above Normal water level (75th to 90th percentile). Nineteen percent of wellsranked Normal water level (25th to 75th percentile). Twenty-five percent of wells were ranked BelowNormal (10th to 25th percentile). Fifty-one percent of wells were ranked Low water level ( 10th percentile).The information in this report is provided by DNR through long term programs committed to recording and tracking the long term statusof our water resources. The current conditions of precipitation, stream flows, lake levels, and groundwater levels in this report providevaluable information for natural and economic resource management on a state, county, and watershed level. If you have questions onthe content of this report please contact DNR Climatology Office: climate@umn.edu

Minnesota Counties and Major Watershed Index7170KITTSON698079ROSEAU78656875LAKE OF THE WOODS74BELTRAMIMARSHALL6773PENNINGTON6263RED DNR Major Watershed Level 4 Hydrologic Unit R TAILCLAYWILKIN569CASSWADENA11ST. LOUISCROW WING13PINE105455BIG PPEWAANOKA20MEEKER24RAMSEYHENNEPINLAC QUI PARLE25RENVILLE19YELLOW OODHUEDODGE41WABASHA4032WASECA30MARTINDAKOTALE SUEURBROWNMURRAY COTTONWOODROCK LTONWASHINGTON58LAKEAITKIN504948FREEBORN MOWER474346Level 2 Hydrologic Unit (HUC4)Cedar RiverMissouri - Big Sioux RiversLower Mississippi RiverRainy RiverDes Moines RiverMinnesota RiverMississippi - Upper Iowa RiversMississippi River - Headwaters42OLMSTED WINONAFILLMOREMissouri - Little Sioux RiversRed River of the NorthSt. Croix RiverWestern Lake 81.82.83.84.Lake Superior - NorthLake Superior - SouthSt. Louis RiverCloquet RiverNemadji River(none)Mississippi River - HeadwatersLeech Lake RiverMississippi River - Grand RapidsMississippi River - BrainerdPine RiverCrow Wing RiverRedeye RiverLong Prairie RiverMississippi River - SartellSauk RiverMississippi River - St. CloudNorth Fork Crow RiverSouth Fork Crow RiverMississippi River - Twin CitiesRum RiverMinnesota River - HeadwatersPomme de Terre RiverLac Qui Parle RiverMinnesota - Yellow Medicine RiversChippewa RiverRedwood RiverMinnesota River - MankatoCottonwood RiverBlue Earth RiverWatonwan RiverLe Sueur RiverLower Minnesota RiverUpper St. Croix RiverKettle RiverSnake RiverLower St. Croix RiverMississippi River - Lake PepinCannon RiverMississippi River - WinonaZumbro RiverMississippi River - La CrescentRoot RiverMississippi River - Reno(none)Upper Iowa RiverUpper Wapsipinicon RiverCedar RiverShell Rock RiverWinnebago RiverDes Moines River - HeadwatersLower Des Moines RiverEast Fork Des Moines RiverBois de Sioux RiverMustinka RiverOtter Tail RiverUpper Red River of the NorthBuffalo RiverRed River of the North - Marsh RiverWild Rice RiverRed River of the North - Sandhill RiverUpper/Lower Red LakeRed Lake River(none)Thief RiverClearwater RiverRed River of the North - Grand Marais CreekSnake RiverRed River of the North - Tamarac RiverTwo RiversRoseau RiverRainy River - HeadwatersVermilion RiverRainy River - Rainy LakeRainy River - Black RiverLittle Fork RiverBig Fork RiverRapid RiverRainy River - BaudetteLake of the WoodsUpper Big Sioux RiverLower Big Sioux RiverRock RiverLittle Sioux River

ClimatologyU.S. Drought MonitorAugust 31, 2021Total PrecipitationDeparture from Normal:August 2021Total PrecipitationAugust 2021(preliminary)DNR Major WatershedDrought IntensityD0 Drought - Abnormally DryD1 Drought - ModerateD2 Drought - SevereD3 Drought - ExtremeD4 Drought - 04.03.02.01.0inchesAugust 3, 2021August 2021 brought some welcome relief to the drought across the central and southern parts of the state.Precipitation totals were from one to three inches above normal over many places in the south. Parts of northwestMinnesota also saw a surplus of precipitation. Northeast Minnesota in general fell short of normal. The NationalWeather Service cooperative observer at La Crescent (far southeastern Minnesota) recorded the highest monthly rainfalltotal, with 11.85 inches. One of the lower totals was the Duluth International Airport with 2.44 inches or 1.29 inchesshort of normal. In general, the average station in the state had around five inches of precipitation. The August 31 U. S.Drought Monitor map depicts 8% of the state in the Abnormally Dry category, 23% in the Moderate Drought category,27% in the Severe Drought category, 31% in the Extreme Drought category and 7% in the Exceptional Drought category.Beginning with the August 10 Drought Monitor, this was the first time since the inception of the U.S. Drought Monitor in2000 that the Exceptional Drought intensity was reported. The U.S. Drought Monitor index is a blend of science andsubjectivity where drought categories (Moderate, Severe, etc.) are based on several indicators.6.05.04.03.02.01.00.0-1.0-2.0-3.0inches

Surface Water: Stream Flow#KITTSO N67#8071#70Stream Flow ConditionsAugust 202179ROSEAU69#6568MARSHALLLAKE OFTHE WOO 42781LYON82MURRAYPIPESTONE83NO BLESMEEKERRENVILLE282951WATONWANJACKSON84# 5352###BLUEEARTH30MARTIN# Designated major watershed gage* Percentile ranking based on mean daily flows for the currentmonth averaged and ranked with all historical mean daily flowsfor that month.A watershed ranked at zero means that the present month flowis the lowest in the period of record; a ranking of 100 indicatesthe highest in the period of record.A ranking at the 50th percentile (median) specifies that thepresent-month flow is in the middle of the historical distribution.#DAKOTARICELESUEUR#COTTONWO O WN37CHISAGO20HENNEPIN19# 34ANOKA#39#3249DODGE48#This map is based on provisional stream gage datafrom the USGS National Water Information SystemWABASHA41STEELE5038GOO EODREDW OOD##July 202134#ISANTISHERBURNEKANDIYOHI#LINCOLN171825YELLO WMEDICINEBENTON#STEARNS# SWIFT#LAC QUI PARLE# CHIPPEWAMILLELACSPrevious Flow Conditions353621#5CARLTONAITKIN151626#ROCK#MO NO RMAN7#7376KOOCHICHING776159##PENNINGTON6374##67# POLK7578#40#OLMSTED43MOW ER474642WINO NAFILLMOREHOUSTON#4644High Flows ( 90th percentile)Above Normal Flows (75 - 90th percentile)Normal Flows (25 - 75th percentile)Below Normal Flows (10 - 25th percentile)Low Flows ( 10th percentile)Flow affected by iceFlow affected by backwaterRating being developed or revisedNo Data

Surface Water: Lake LevelsLake Level StatusAugust 2021( Lake of the Woods!KITTSONROSEAULAKE OF THE WOODSBELTRAMIMARSHALL(!PENNINGTONKOOCHICHINGRED ar(!COOK(!Turtle TER TAILCLAYWILKINEdwardEast BattleST. LOUISCROW WING(!(!CARLTON(!BIG STONE(!(!Mille CKNOBLES(!BROWNIndianHENNEPINCARVERUpper PriorYELLOW !(!White Bear(!!(!(LE SAGO( Green!CHIPPEWAREDWOODNorth CenterSHERBURNEKANDIYOHI(!PokegamaBENTONSWIFT( Shetek!(!(!KANABECSTEARNSPOPELAC QUI PARLEPrevious ConditionsJuly r Cormorant(!!((!DAKOTAMarion(!NICOLLETWest REEBORNHOUSTONMOWER* Percentile ranking based on last reported reading for the currentmonth compared to all historical reported levels for that month.A lake ranked at zero means that the present reported levelis the lowest in the period of record; a ranking of 100 indicatesthe highest in the period of record.A ranking at the 50th percentile (median) specifies that the presentmonth reported lake level is in the middle of the historical distribution.Source data from: MN DNR Waters Lake Level Minnesota Monitoring ProgramPercentile *!((!(!(!(!!(High Water Levels ( 90th percentile)Above Normal Water Levels (75 - 90th percentile)Normal Water Levels (25 - 75th percentile)Below Normal Water Levels (10 - 25th percentile)Low Water Levels ( 10th percentile)No reading availableLevel 2 Hydrologic UnitDNR Major Watershed(!

GroundwaterGroundwater Level Historical RankingsAugust 2021####""#######"# ###!"!!!!! !!!!!!"""!!!!# ######"####""""""! " " ""!!"""!!"!""""!!"Minnesota Groundwater Provinces 2021East-centralSouth-centralKarst!""!" "!""!!!""!! " !! !!!!""""""""""! """""""" """"""" """""!!!"! """"""""!" ""!!!!!!"" """"""!!!""! ! !"!!!!!"!! !!! !!!" ! !!!!! ! !"!" "!!!""!!CentralWesternArrowhead-shallow bedrock* Percentile ranking based on last reported reading for the current monthcompared to all historical reported levels for that month. A water level ranked atzero means that the present reported level is the lowest in the period of record; aranking of 100 indicates the highest in the period of record. A ranking at the 50thpercentile (median) specifies that the present month reported water level is in themiddle of the historical distribution.Source data from: MN DNR Groundwater Level Monitoring ProgramPercentile *" High Water Levels ( 90th percentile)" Above Normal Water Levels (75 - 90th percentile)" Normal Water Levels (25 - 75th percentile)" Below Normal Water Levels (10 - 25th percentile)" Low Water Levels ( 10th percentile)" No reading availableAquifer Type####!" """"""##""""""""""""# # ### ########"" ""## ##"""""""""!!! !! ""! " " ! !!! !! !""! !!! "## # #### ##""""""""!"#!##"# #""" " "" """""##### #### # ###### ##### ###### ############ ##### # ################ ###### ########## ############# # #""## ##""""" """"""" ""#" """"""""" "" """"""""# ###!############# ## ######### # ### ####### ###"Previous ConditionsJuly " """############""""!###"######## ####"""""##""!"Water TableBedrockBuried Artesian

47. Upper Wapsipinicon River 48. C eda rRiv 49. Shell Rock River 50. W in ebago Rv r 51. Des Moines River - Headwaters 52. Lower Des Moines River 53. East Fork Des Moines River 54. B o is d eS ux Rv r 55. Mustinka River 56. Otter Tail River 57. Upper Red River of the North 58. Buffalo River

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