Rough Path Analysis

3y ago
74 Views
3 Downloads
1.40 MB
116 Pages
Last View : 9d ago
Last Download : 4m ago
Upload by : Francisco Tran
Transcription

Bruce K. DriverRough Path AnalysisFebruary 22, 2013 File:rps.tex

ContentsPart I Rough Path Analysis1From Feynman Heuristics to Brownian Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1 Construction and basic properties of Brownian motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2p–2.12.22.32.43Banach Space p – variation results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213.1 Hölder Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253.2 Metric Space Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264The Bounded Variation Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.1 Integration Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.3 Calculus Bounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Bounded Variation Ordinary Differential Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.5 Some Linear ODE Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.6 Smooth Dependence on Initial Conditions and Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272729323436435Young’s Integration Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.1 Calculus Properties and Estimates of p – Variation Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.2 Additive (Almost) Rough Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3 Young’s ODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.4 An a priori – Bound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.5 An Existence Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .495557606062Variations and Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Computing Vp (x) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brownian Motion in the Rough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Bounded Variation Obstruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56911131516

4Contents5.6 Continuous dependence on the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635.7 Towards Rougher Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646Tensors and Tensor Norms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.1 Algebraic Tensor Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.1.1 Projection Construction of Tensor Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.2 Topological Considerations I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .676771717Rough Paths with 2 p 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.1 Lifting paths to T (V ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.2 Rough Paths with 2 p 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.3 Tensor Norms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.4 Algebraic Preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.5 The Geometric Subgroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.6 Characterizations of Algebraic Multiplicative Functionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .777778797981848Homogeneous Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.1 Lie group p – variation results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.2 Homogeneous Metrics on G (V ) and Ggeo (V ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.3 Carnot Caratheodory Distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89899093Part II Appendices9Bochner Integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 999.1 Banach Valued Lp – Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 999.2 Bochner Integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10210 General Vector Measures and Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10510.1 Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10510.2 Fubini Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2013/12:37

Part IRough Path Analysis

Here are a few suggested references for this course, [2,19,22]. The latter tworeferences are downloadable if you are logging into MathSci net through yourUCSD account. For a proof that all p – variation paths have some extensionto a rough path see, [21] and also see [9, Theorem 9.12 and Remark 9.13]. Forother perspectives on the the theory, see [6] and also see Gubinelli [10, 11] Alsosee, [7,10,12] look interesting. A recent paper which deals with global existenceissues for non-bounded vector fields is Lejay [18].

1From Feynman Heuristics to Brownian Motion1ZtIn the physics literature one often finds the following informal expression,RT 0 21 1ω (τ ) dτdµT (ω) “e 2 0 DT ω” for ω WT ,(1.1)Z (T )where WT is the set of continuous paths, ω : [0, T ] R (or Rd ), such thatω (0) 0,YDT ω “m (dω (t)) ” (m is Lebesgue measure here)0 t Tand Z (T ) is a normalization constant such that µT (WT ) 1.We begin by giving meaning to this expression. For 0 s t T, letZ t2E[s,t] (ω) : ω 0 (τ ) dτ.ZWt 1 Es (ω)Z Z 1 y ω(s) 2C (s, t)e 2F ω [0,s] , y e 2 t s dyDω[0,s]ZtZ (s)Rd Z Z21 y ω(s) C (s, t) F (ω, y) e 2 t s dy dµs (ω) .ZtWsRd γ (s) γ (t) 0, and hencetσ 0 (τ ) · γ 0 (τ ) dτ sZtσ 0 (τ ) · γ 0 (τ ) dτs Taking F 1 in this equation then implies, Z Z21 y ω(s) C (s, t)1 e 2 t s dy dµs (ω)ZtWRdZ shiC (s, t)C (s, t)d/2d/2 (2π (t s)) .(2π (t s))dµs (ω) ZtZtWsω (t) ω (s)· (γ (t) γ (s)) 0.t sThus it follows thatE[s,t] (ω) E[s,t] (σ) E[s,t] (γ) ω (t) ω (s)t s2(t s) E[s,t] (γ)2 ω (t) ω (s) E[s,t] (γ) .t s Thus if f (ω) F ω [0,s] , ω (t) , we will have, e 21 Es (ω) 1 ω(t) ω(s) 2t sF ω [0,s] , ω (t)e 2.Z (s)Multiplying this equation by Z1t Dω[0,s] · dω (t) and integrating the result thenimplies,Z F ω [0,s] , ω (t) dµt (ω)τ s(ω (t) ω (s)) and γ (τ ) : ω (τ ) σ (τ ) ,t sω(t) ω(s),t sand now fixing ω [0,s] and ω (t) and then doing t

Here are a few suggested references for this course, [2,19,22]. The latter two references are downloadable if you are logging into MathSci net through your UCSD account. For a proof that all p{ variation paths have some extension to a rough path see, [21] and also see [9, Theorem 9.12 and Remark 9.13]. For other perspectives on the the theory, see [6] and also see Gubinelli [10,11] Also see .

Related Documents:

of branched rough paths introduced in (J. Differential Equations 248 (2010) 693–721). We first show that branched rough paths can equivalently be defined as γ-Hölder continuous paths in some Lie group, akin to geometric rough paths. We then show that every branched rough path can be encoded in a geometric rough path. More precisely, for every branched rough path Xlying above apathX .

Mini-course on Rough Paths (TU Wien, 2009) P.K. Friz, Last update: 20 Jan 2009. Contents Chapter 1. Rough Paths 1 1. On control ODEs 1 2. The algebra of iterated integrals 6 3. Rough Path Spaces 14 4. Rough Path Estimates for ODEs I 20 5. Rough Paths Estimates for ODEs II 23 6. Rough Di erential Equations 25 Chapter 2. Applications to Stochastic Analysis 29 1. Enhanced Brownian motion as .

Genie GS2032/GS1930/GS1932 Genie GS26/46 Genie GS32/46 Genie GS32/68 Genie 26/68 Scissor - Rough Terrain Genie 32/68 Scissor - Rough Terrain Self Levelling Genie Z30/20N RJ Genie Z34/22 Bi Fuel Genie Z34/22 Rough Terrain Genie Z45/25J Manitou 150ATS Rough Terrain Genie Z51/30 Rough Terrain Genie

DAC DAC ADC ADC. X19532-062819. Figur e 2: RF-ADC Tile Structure. mX0_axis Data Path ADC VinX0 mX1_axis Data Path ADC VinX1 mX2_axisData Path ADC VinX2 mX3_axis Data Path ADCVinX3 mX3_axis mX1_axis ADC mX0_axis Data Path ADC Data Path ADC VinX_23 VinX_01 Data Path Data Path Dual RF-ADC Tile Quad RF-ADC Tile. X23275-100919. Chapter 2: Overview

Rough paths, invariance principles in the rough path topology, additive functionals of Markov pro-cesses, Kipnis–Varadhan theory, homogenization, random conductance model, random walks with random conductances. We gratefully acknowledge financial support by the DFG via Research Unit FOR2402 — Rough paths, SPDEs and related topics. The main part of the work of T.O. was carried out while he .

2 Path Analysis Wright's work on relative influence of heredity and environment in guinea pig coloration Developed analytic system and first path diagrams Path analysis characterized by three components: a path diagram, equations relating correlati ons to unknown parameters, the decomposition of effects 7 8 Path Analysis Little application or interest in path analysis

an O. Henry Award for “A Worn Path.” Her award-winning memoir, One Writer’s Beginnings (1984), was a runaway bestseller. Despite being very articulate about her writing, sitting graciously through countless interviews, and receiving large numbers of young fans at her home, Welty remained a very private person who always maintainedFile Size: 1MBPage Count: 16Explore furtherShort Story Project: "A Worn Path" by Eudora Welty - YouTubewww.youtube.com"A Worn Path" by Eudora Welty - 584 Words Essay Exampleivypanda.comA Worn Path: Study Guide SparkNoteswww.sparknotes.comWhat is the meaning of the short story "A Worn Path" by .www.enotes.comShort Story Analysis: A Worn Path by Eudora Welty - The .sittingbee.comRecommended to you b

Each node maintains distance to destination e.g. 4 hops to network XYZ, . found better E path 4. C is lowest path cost in TENT, place C in PATH, exame C's LSP, found better E path again 5. E is lowest path cost in TENT, place E in PATH, examine E's LSP (no better paths) 6. TENT is empty, terminate . TDC375 Winter 2002 John Kristoff - DePaul University Open shortest path first (OSPF) 27 .