Lesson 1: Introduction To Hospitality And Tourism

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Lesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and TourismUnit: Hospitality and TourismLesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and TourismNational Content StandardsGrade Level 10-1210.1.1 Determine the roles and functions of individuals engaged in hospitality, tourism, and recreation careers.10.1.2 Explore opportunities for employment and entrepreneurial endeavors.10.1.4 Examine the impact of hospitality, tourism, and recreation occupations on local, state, national, and globaleconomies.ObjectivesUpon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:Explain what the Hospitality and Tourism industry is and how it affects economiesGive examples of jobs relating to and/or affected by the different sectors of the H & T industry.Show how tourism dollars flow into an economy because of the H & T industryIntroductionThe word hospitality comes from the Latin word hospes, which means host or guest. Hospitality has come tomean meeting the needs of guests with kindness and goodwill. The hospitality and tourism industry (H &Tindustry) meets the needs of people with kindness and goodwill while they are away from their homes. The H & Tindustry is broken into four service sectors: food and beverage, lodging, recreation, and travel and tourism.According to the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC), H & T is the world’s largest industry, and has a currentannual growth rate of 4.2% worldwide. In USA dollars, the world H & T industry is expected to generate over 6.4trillion in 2007. By 2016 it is projected to generate 12.1 trillion. Hospitality creates jobs, allows economies to grow,and helps people explore the world for personal satisfaction or business. Below are some hospitality statistics thatsupport these claims.These statistics are from the WTTC and were collected in 2006; they are representative of the worldwide hospitalityindustry.For more information visit: t – number of jobs generatedby hospitality industryVisitor Exports – foreign visitor spendingin an economy8.7% of total employment worldwide or 1 inevery 11 ½ jobs11.8% of total exports (US 1.6 trillion)Personal Hospitality – amount spent onhospitality by residents in their country oforigin9.5% of total personal consumption, or US 2.8 trillion.Business Hospitality – amount spent onhospitality for business purposesUS 672 billion, projected to almost doubleby 2016Capital Investment – hospitalitycapital investments (money spent in publicand private sectors investing in hospitalityindustry)9.3% of total investmentPage 1

Lesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and TourismGovernment Expenditures – spending bygovernments worldwide on hospitalityindustry and visitors300 billion or 3.8% of total governmentspendingIn the United States alone, over 1.6 trillion was generated in 2006 from the hospitality industry. The hospitalityndindustry is the 2 largest employer in country; the healthcare industry is first (Reynolds, 20). More than 15 millionpeople work in the industry, which is equivalent to 1 in every 9.2 jobs across the country or 10.9% of totalemployment. Americans spent, on average, 9.4% of their personal consumption dollars on hospitality and theUnited States as a whole spends more on hospitality than any other country in the world.In Kentucky, hospitality is the second largest industry; agriculture is the first.The H & T industry is about service. The industry provides service to people when they are away from their home,and sometimes even when they are home. For example, home delivery of food would be part of the hospitalityindustry as would a masseuse that does home visits or a cook that does at-home cooking lessons or catering.The H &T industry is about diversity. There are small, large, privately owned, and publicly owned businesses.There are people of every socioeconomic class, cultural background, race, age, and religion involved with H &T,both in providing and receiving the services. The H & T industry reaches every corner of the globe, while providingjobs, entertainment, food, transportation, and a place sleep.The H & T industry is about entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs are people that start businesses. The H & T industry isfull of businesses that serve people and are owned by a single person or family. This means not only are theremany H & T jobs working for someone else, there is a lot of H &T opportunity to work for yourself. Worldwideexamples of entrepreneurs creating small businesses that became big business are: McDonalds, Marriott hotels,Holiday Inn hotels, Albertsons food stores, and Southwest Airlines.The hospitality industry is complex. It covers a wide range of jobs, locations, activities, and economic brackets.There are 4 sectors of the hospitality industry: food and beverage, lodging, recreation, and travel and tourism.The food and beverage industry, also known as the foodservice industry, consists of businesses that preparefood for customers. It is the largest segment of the hospitality industry in the US. It is estimated that thefoodservice industry provides 50% of all meals eaten in the US today; with so many people eating out, manyopportunities for food entrepreneurs exist. A business in this industry can range from casual to fancy, large tosmall, expensive to inexpensive. The number of people employed in foodservice industry is expected to doubleby 2015 to approximately 22 million people (Reynolds 23)Lodging, also known as accommodation, is a place to sleep for one or more nights. A business in the lodgingindustry is a business that provides a place for people to sleep overnight. It can be one of many sleeping placessuch as a fancy hotel, a youth hostel, an elder hostel, a campground, or highway side motel.Recreation is any activity that people do for rest, relaxation, and enjoyment. The goal of recreation is to refresh aperson’s body and mind. Any business that provides an activity for rest, relaxation, and enjoyment in order torefresh a person’s body and mind is in the recreation business. Recreation businesses are incredibly diversebecause people have varying ideas on what activities they participate in for rest, relaxation and enjoyment. Thereare four general types of recreation businesses: entertainment, attractions, spectator sports, and participatorysports.The travel industry is in the business of moving people from place to place while the tourism industry providesthose people with services that promote travel and vacations. Busses, planes, cabs, boats, and passenger trainsare all part of the travel industry while travel agencies, tour operators, cruise companies, convention planners, andvisitors bureaus are all part of the tourism industry.The H & T industry helps other industries around it grow, thus creating a basis for an economy. In “tourist towns”,for example, the entire economy is built up around the H & T industry. In places like this, a lawyer is not directlypart of the hospitality industry, but a lawyer that works for a hotel chain is supported by the hospitality industry anda school teacher that teaches in this type of community is also supported by the hospitality industry. Shop owners,Page 2

Lesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and Tourismbusiness providers, government agencies, and other service providers all rely on the tourism to bring people intotheir businesses.Other, non-tourist based economies also rely on the H & T industry for growth. For example, an agriculturecommunity that raises lots of barley may supply much of their crop to alcohol manufacturing, which in turn is servedin the foodservice sector of the H & T industry. Another example would be a M.D. that specializes in orthopedicsurgery and lives in a town where many injuries are due to recreational activities.Ultimately, any town with a hotel, restaurant, or recreational activity is affected by and employs people in thehospitality industry.The ability to serve people food, give them a place to sleep, and provide them with entertainment is the back boneof many economies the globe over.Brainstorm list:ooooooooVacation placesFood EatenActivities doneHow to get there?Where did you stay?What did you buy?What to do if you stay home instead?Answer the following question:If you could take a 4-day vacation this weekend, anywhere inthe world, where would you go?List all the employees/businesses that would be needed to maketheir weekend happen Defining H & T: The hospitality and tourism industry (H & T industry) meets the needs ofpeople with kindness and goodwill while they are away from their homes.Discussing EntrepreneursThe H & T industry is about entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs are people that startbusinesses. The H & T industry is full of businesses that serve people and are owned by asingle person or family. This means not only are there many H & T jobs working forsomeone else, there is a lot of H &T opportunity to work for yourself.Worldwide examples of entrepreneurs creating small businesses that became big businessare: McDonalds, Marriott hotels, Holiday Inn hotels, Albertsons food stores, and SouthwestAirlines.Discussing how H & T affects economiesThe H & T industry helps other industries around it grow, thus creating a basis for aneconomy. In “tourist towns”, for example, the entire economy is built up around the H & Tindustry. In places like this, a lawyer is not directly part of the hospitality industry, but alawyer that works for a hotel chain is supported by the hospitality industry and a schoolteacher that teaches in this type of community is also supported by the hospitality industry.Shop owners, business providers, government agencies, and other service providers allrely on the tourism to bring people into their businesses.Page 3

Lesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and TourismOther, non-tourist based economies also rely on the H & T industry for growth. Forexample, an agriculture community that raises lots of barley may supply much of their cropto alcohol manufacturing, which in turn is served in the foodservice sector of the H & Tindustry. Another example would be a M.D. that specializes in orthopedic surgery andlives in a town where many injuries are due to recreational activities.Ultimately, any town with a hotel, restaurant, or recreational activity is affected by andemploys people in the hospitality industry.The ability to serve people food, give them a place to sleep, and provide them withentertainment is the back bone of many economies the globe over.Body of Lesson 25 minutesToday’s lesson will focus on guided reading for the transfer of information from teacher to student.Page 4

Lesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and TourismPass out Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism information sheetGive students 20 minutes to read information sheet in class and create a concept map of the information read.Pair IEP students with readers.IEP students use an alternate mindmap.ConclusionEconomic Impact of Hospitality and Tourism HomeworkReview with students what was learned by having a few students share something they learned today.Discuss (2-3 minutes) the question: Why is the hospitality industry important to economies?Pass out Economic Impact of Hospitality and Tourism HomeworkWhen Homework is collected, put a couple of the Economic Impact flow charts on the bulletin board, or put up theexample one at the end of this lesson plan.Additional activity: This activity is designed to address the logic/math minded students.Have students visit the World Travel and Tourism Council web site http://www.wttc.orgHave students search out one statistic related to Hospitality and Tourism and write one paragraph on howthat statistic affects the economy that the statistic is taken from.MaterialsBrainstorm lists and questionIntroduction to Hospitality and Tourism information sheetsEconomic Impact of Hospitality and Tourism HomeworkWorks CitedReynolds, J.S. Hospitality Services. (2004). The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.Page 5

Lesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and TourismGrading Rubric for Hospitality and Tourism MindmapName:The following topics must be represented in your mindmap. You may add more detail if you like.Topics to be representedPoints PossibleFood ServiceLodgingRecreationTravel and Tourism.5.5.5.5At least one example of a job ineach sector of H & TAt least one statisticDiversity41.5Service orientedEntrepreneurs.5.5At least one example of anentrepreneur in H & TSupport to other industries1PointsEarned.5At least three examples of jobs inother industries created by H & TLegible31Total Points EarnedTotal Points PossibleTotal Score:14/14Page 6

Lesson 1: Introduction to Hospitality and TourismNameDateClassEconomic Impact of Hospitality HomeworkDirections: Study the following picture. Choose a traveler in the figure and create a flow chart that describes his/hertrip and shows how the money the traveler spends flows through the entire economy. You can use words, pictures,drawings, etc to enhance your flow chart; you can do your flow chart on the computer or by hand. Attach flow chartto this page.Page 7

The word hospitality comes from the Latin word hospes, which means host or guest. Hospitality has come to mean meeting the needs of guests with kindness and goodwill. The hospitality and tourism industry (H &T industry) meets the needs of people with kindness and goodwill while they are away from their homes.

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