Assessing Participants Readiness To Change

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Assessing Participants’ Readiness to ChangeParticipants entering the lifestyle change program must be prepared to make lifelongchanges to their behaviors and surroundings. If participants enroll in the programresistant and unwilling to change their current behaviors, the likelihood that they willachieve success in reaching their goals decreases. This section will help you to betterunderstand the behavior change process and evaluate a potential participant’s readinessto change.This section will cover: The meaning of readiness to changeThe stages of change processTools to assess readiness to changeReadiness to Change: What is it?Readiness to change refers to how willing someone is to change their behavior. To ensurethat participants receive the greatest benefits from the lifestyle change program, it’simportant to assess the readiness level of each individual.Ways to Assess a Participant’s Readiness to ChangePrior to enrollment in the lifestyle change program, it is important to assess participants’readiness to change. There are numerous ways to assess participant readiness, but thisoverview will focus on the Readiness to Change Questionnaire and a Readiness to ChangeScreening tool.This document was created or adapted by DTTAC for use in the National Diabetes Prevention Program andis available at Common Ground, www.lccommonground.org.

Transtheoretical Model: Stages of ChangeNorcross, J.C., Krebs, P.M., & Prochaska, J.O. Stages of Change. (2012). Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67(2), 143-154.The Transtheoretical Model describes a five stage process of behavior change. This modelis helpful because recognizing the stage a participant is in allows you to gain insight intothe likelihood of success of a potential participant in the program, and determine whetherthey should begin the lifestyle intervention or delay entry until they have a strongercommitment.The stages of change process includes the following: Precontemplation- Participants in the precontemplation stage do not have anyintention of changing their behavior within the near future. They may be unawarethat they need to make a behavior change. Contemplation – If a participant is in the contemplation stage, they will have justbegun to think about making a change within the near future (6 months). Changingis on their mind, but they are not ready to take action yet. Preparation – A participant in this stage is planning on making a change soon,often within the next month. Action – Participants in this stage have changed their behavior within the last 6months. Tips for maintaining a commitment to the behavior are important forparticipants in this stage. Maintenance – In the maintenance stage, participants have sustained a behaviorchange for more than 6 months. Participants will need to continue to take steps toprevent from relapsing back into old behaviors that can lead to weight gain.This document was created or adapted by DTTAC for use in the National Diabetes Prevention Program andis available at Common Ground, www.lccommonground.org.

Readiness to Change QuestionnaireWhere am I right now?Thinking about your physical activity and eating over the past three months, please answer the followingquestions. Please circle one number to indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the followingstatements. (Check “Don’t know or refused” if you do not know or do not want to answer.)StronglyAgreeNot SureDisagreeAgreeStronglyDisagreeI eat healthily.54321I get enough physicalactivity.54321I want to eat morehealthily.54321I want to be morephysically active.54321Don’tKnow orRefusedHow confident are you that you can make changes now?Please circle one number to indicate how confident you are that you can make the following changes.(Check “Don’t know or refused” if you do not know or do not want to answer.)Physical Activity:Sure I canThink IcanNot sure Don’t thinkI canI canGet physical activity more often4321Be physically active for longer time4321Don’t knowor refusedThis document was created or adapted by DTTAC for use in the National Diabetes Prevention Program andis available at Common Ground, www.lccommonground.org.

Eating:Sure I canThink IcanNot sureI canDon’tthink IcanEat more healthful food4321Overeat less often4321Don’t know orrefusedNatioAdapted from: National Diabetes Education Program. (2008). Power to Prevent: A Family Lifestyle Approach toDiabetes Prevention. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.Retrieved from This document was created or adapted by DTTAC for use in the National Diabetes Prevention Program andis available at Common Ground, www.lccommonground.org.

Readiness to Change Screening Tool1.Are you here because YOU want to make changes? If you feel pressured into coming byyour spouse, doctor or a friend, you may not be ready to lose weight. There a good chanceyou’ll be setting yourself up to fail.2.Are you ready to make a life-long commitment to healthy moderate eating habits andregular physical activity? Think about the amount of weight you want to lose. Everyonewants to lose weight instantly, but in this program you will lose weight gradually. If you’rewilling to spend time developing new eating and activity patterns over the next severalmonths, there’s good chance this program is for you.3.Are you ready to make this a priority in your life? Changing long upheld behaviors andlosing weight takes time and effort. Besides attending the session weekly for 16 weeks thenmonthly for the next year, you’ll need to spend time recording your food and activity eachday. If you’re already overcommitted, this might not be the right time for you to start. Thisprogram will be available when it works best for you to begin.4.Are you willing to be accountable for your food and physical activity choices? Youmay have been in other programs where everything is laid out for you. The key of thisprogram is to find what works best for you. This will involve some serious thinking anddecisions about what you are willing to change.5.Are you ready to create a target goal weight that is realistic and healthy for you?Studies have shown that a weight loss of 7% is sufficient to provide health benefits andreduce risks for type 2 diabetes. If you have a substantial amount to lose, you may haveintermediate goals. The success of this program involves achieving a weight that can bemaintained by staying active and eating at sufficient levels.Your commitment is important as it takes hard work to change habits. We know this programworks, as it’s based on years of research. To be successful, we ask you think about yourreadiness, sign a contract and make a commitment to the goals of 7% weight loss and 150minutes of weekly physical activity.Signature:Date:This document was created or adapted by DTTAC for use in the National Diabetes Prevention Program andis available at Common Ground, www.lccommonground.org.

Think about the amount of weight you want to lose. Everyone wants to lose weight instantly, but in this program you will lose weight gradually. If you’re willing to spend time developing new eating and activity patterns over the next several months, there’s good chance this program is for you. 3. Are you ready to make this a priority in .

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