Bridging Ceremonies - Girl Scouts

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Bridging CeremoniesTable of ContentsCeremonies for Girl Scout Daises.2Ceremonies for Girl Scout Brownies.7Ceremonies for Girl Scout Juniors.10Ceremonies for Service Units or Multi-Level Troops.131

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout DaisiesCeremony 1 –The Basic CeremonySupplies: Bridge, stepping stones or arch AwardsPreparation: Practice lining up near thebridge, reading the Daisy poem, walkingover the bridge, reading the Browniepoem and what to do with the awardsonce received.Formation: Girl Scout Daisies andLeader 1 stand on one side of thebridge. Leader 2 stands on the otherside of the bridge, welcoming them asGirl Scout Brownies.The Bridging CeremonyLeader 1:The Daisy is a flower,As pure and white as can be.Juliette Low was called Daisy,She started Girl Scouts, you see.And now the time is near,Daisies will bridge to brownies,For another Girl Scout year.Girl Scout Daisies walk over the bridgeone at a time and a leader hands themtheir awards.Ceremony #2 – The Brownie ElfSupplies:Bridge, stepping stones or archMirror to represent a pondThe Brownie story (page 18 of The Brownie Girl’s Guide to GirlScouting)Preparation: Invite a Girl Scout Brownie troop to help during the bridging ceremony.Inform them of the time and date of the ceremony and confirm theirattendance. Read the Brownie Story at least one week before the ceremony, so girls willunderstand the meaning of the ceremony. This ceremony has several parts, make sure to tell the girls what to expectand practice! Review the Girl Scout handshake and the Girl Scout slogan (Do a GoodTurn Daily.)Formation: The Girl Scout Daisy troop should be on one side of the bridge withtheir leader closest to the bridge. The Girl Scout Brownie troop should be on theother side of the bridge with their leader in a circle.The Bridging CeremonyCrossing the bridge: A Girl Scout Brownie goes to the bridge and calls out thename of a Girl Scout Daisy. The Girl Scout Daisy goes to her leader to receive herDaisy Ending Certificate. She goes over the bridge and enters the Brownie Circle.Continue this until every Girl Scout Daisy has gone over the bridge and into thecircle.(While the leader is reciting the poem below, the Girl Scout Brownie leader sets upthe “pond.”)Leader 2:Girl Scout Daisy Leader:Brownies you’ll be for two short yearsMake the most of each day that goesby.Be cheerful and helpful and do a goodturn,And greet each Girl Scout with a “Hi.”Our Daisy years were lots of fun.Now it’s over and Brownies has begun!Our troop has read the Brownie Story about Brownie elf and her magical self.Now we, too, will perform a little magic of “let’s pretend.”Please place your certificates on the floor behind you and close your eyes while Iread a poem.Cross your little fingers, stand upon your toes,That’s a bit of magic every Girl Scout Brownie knows.Now we all are standing in a forest glade,Listen very carefully; see the magic made.Open your eyes.Here we are in the big woods,Before you is a pond.You can almost hear the Wise Old OwlAnd the friends of which you’re fond.2

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout Daisies (continued)One at a time a Girl Scout Brownie takes a Girl Scout Daisy to the “pond” andrepeats:Twist me and turn me and show me the elf,I looked in the water and saw “myself.”(Girl Scout Daisy says “myself”)The Girl Scout Brownie then takes the Girl Scout Daisy to the Girl Scout Brownieleader who pins theCeremony #3 – The Girl ScoutPromise and LawSupplies: Bridge, stepping stones, or arch. Materials to make 13 paper orcardboard daisies to representthe three parts of the Girl ScoutLaw and the ten parts of theGirl Scout Promise. Write onepromise or law onto the back ofeach daisy. Copies of this script for each girland adult participating.Girl Scout Brownie pin on her uniform upside down, gives the Girl Scout handshakeand asks the newGirl Scout Brownie to repeat the Girl Scout Promise. The Girl Scout Brownie thentakes the new GirlScout Brownie back to the ring. Repeat this procedure for each Girl Scout Daisy.Preparation:Girl Scout Brownie Leader: You are now all Girl Scout Brownies. The Girl Scoutslogan is “Do a Good Turn Daily.” Go now and do three good turns for your family–one for each part of the Girl Scout Promise. When your good turns are done, have amember of your family turn your pin right side up. Invite a Girl Scout Brownietroop to help during the bridgingceremony. Inform them of thetime and date of the ceremonyand confirm their attendance.Forward a script to them. If a Girl Scout Brownie troopis not available, ask leadersor parents to participate andforward a script to them. Distribute the daisies the girlsmade evenly. Let the girls knowthat they are responsible forreading the promise or law onthe back of each daisy. Help the girls practice and knowwhen their line is coming up.Girl Scout Daisy Leader:Uncross your little fingers,Come down from off your toes.Then the magic goes away,as every Girl Scout knows.Formation: Line girls up in front of thebridge in order of speaking. Girls willstep forward when they read. Afterthe reading girls will line up on one sideof the bridge with one leader whileanother leader stands on the otherside to welcome them as Girl ScoutBrownies.continued on next page3

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout Daisies (continued)The Bridging CeremonyLeader or parent: As our Girl Scout Daisies prepared to bridge to Girl ScoutBrownies we took the time to learn more about Girl Scouting and the Girl ScoutPromise and Law. We’ve invited some friends to help us share what we learned.Older Girl Scout: These flowers represent the spirit of Girl Scouting. This spirit isoften represented with the Daisy, which was our founder, Juliette Low’s, nickname.Older Girl Scout: The first three flowers represent the three parts of the Girl ScoutPromise.Girl Scout Daisy: On my honor, I will try: To serve God and my countryGirl Scout Daisy: To help people at all times.Girl Scout Daisy: And to live by the Girl Scout Law.Girl Scout Daisy: To make the world abetter place.Older Girl Scout: This means you willbe a kind friend to everyone, not just afew people.Older Girl Scout: This means you willhelp with a neighborhood clean up, putlitter in trash cans, and treat all animalskindly.Girl Scout Daisy: To be a sister to everyGirl Scout.Girl Scout Daisy: I will do my best: To be honest and fair.Older Girl Scout: This means that you will always tell the truth and that you willshare things and take turns with others.(Make sure to leave some time forphotos before moving on.)Girl Scout Daisy: To be friendly and helpful.Older Girl Scout: This means that you will ask a new girl to play with you andwhen you see a job that needs to be done, and you can do it, you will be willing tohelp do it.Girl Scout Daisy: To be considerate and caring.Older Girl Scout: This means that you will respect the feelings of others and careabout how they feel and what they think.Girl Scout Daisy: To be courageous and strong.Older Girl Scout: This means you are willing to try new things, even though youmay be a little scared and that you will stand for what is right.Girl Scout Daisy: To be responsible for what I say and do.Older Girl Scout: This means that you will be careful about what you say and doso that you don’t hurt other people or things.Girl Scout Daisy: To respect myself and others.Older Girl Scout: This means you will try to be the best person you can be, andwill be courteous to others.Girl Scout Daisy: To respect authority.Older Girl Scout: This means you will respect adults, obey the law and willcooperate with others.Girl Scout Daisy: To use resources wisely.Older Girl Scout: This means you will try not to waste paper, will turn off thelights, and turn off water faucets after you use them.4Leader: Great job! Now I’d like the girlsto line up on one side of the bridge. AsI call your name you can cross over tobecome a Girl Scout Brownie. (Readnames, use the Girl Scout handshake,and hand out awards.)

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout Daisies (continued)Ceremony #4 – Bake a Batch of Girl Scout BrowniesThe Bridging CeremonySupplies:Leader: We only have a few Girl ScoutBrownies in our troop from last year! Weneed some new Girl Scout Brownies!Oven (very large box decorated to look like an oven with a large opening inthe back) The Brownie Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting (1 per girl) Whisk or spoon Measuring spoons Measuring cups Aprons Sifter Baking pan Spatula Large table Bowl Containers of ‘ingredients’Preparation: Invite a Girl Scout Brownie troop to help during the bridging ceremony.Inform them of the time and date of the ceremony and confirm theirattendance. Forward a script to them. If a Girl Scout Brownie troop is not available, ask leaders or parents toparticipate and forward a script to them. Decorate the box that will serve as the oven. Make sure each bridging girl has a Daisy and Brownie uniform. Help the girls practice and know when their line is coming up.Formation: Bridging Girl Scout Daisies (in uniform) line up behind the oven.Current Girl ScoutBrownies are the ‘bakers.’ Assign speaking parts based on how many girls are in thetroop.Girl Scout Brownie: Yes, what can wedo?Girl Scout Brownie: I know, let’s makesome new Brownies!All girls: Yes, yes, yes!Leader: Let’s look in our handbook forthe recipe. (Girls and leaders pull outtheir Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting).Leader: Here it is! To make GirlScout Brownies, we must mix 3 basicingredients: the Girl Scout Promise, theGirl Scout Law, and a desire to try newthings.(Set the book out where people canread the “recipe” while 1 girl gets out amixing bowl and spoon).Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – In a large bowl, we will creamtogether 1 cup of a promise to serveGod, my country, and mankind.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – To this mixture, add 2 cups ofhonesty and 2 tablespoons of fairness.Mix together until well-blended.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – Stir in one cup of friendlinessand a cup of helpfulness.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – Beat together ½ cup of caringand ½ cup consideration for others.Add to the mixture.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – Now add to the mixture 2 cupsof courage and strength, pour in someresponsibility for what I say and do, andmix well.continued on next page5

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout Daisies (continued)Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading fromthe recipe) – Add one cup of respectfor authority and one cup of respectfor myself and others. Stir untilwell-blended.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – Sift together ½ cup of a wiseuse of resources and 3 tablespoons ofa promise to make the world a betterplace. Stir into mixture.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – Sprinkle on some ‘sisterhoodof Girl Scouting’ and mix well.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading fromthe recipe) – Blend together ½ cup ofDiscover, where they will understandthemselves and their values and usetheir knowledge and skills to explore theworld, ½ cup of Connect, where theywill care about, inspire, and team withothers locally and globally, and TakeAction, where they will act to make theworld a better place.Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading from therecipe) – In a prepared pan, spread thebatter evenly.(Have one or more girls pour the bowlmixture into the pan. Spread it out andthen put it in the oven. Someone insidethe oven should secretly take it sonothing spills.)Girl Scout Brownie: (Reading fromthe recipe) – Bake at a moderatetemperature until done. (Set the dial onthe oven and set the timer).Hidden from the audience view,adults help the Girl Scout Daisieschange into their Girl Scout Brownieuniform.The Daisy Bridging SongWritten by Gina Michael (Tune of Frere Jacques)Goodbye Daisies (wave hand by opening and closing fingers)Goodbye Daisies (wave hand by opening and closing fingers)Sooo long (big arch with hand and arm)Sooo long (big arch with hand and arm)We’re becoming Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)We’re becoming Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)Ooh La La (hands in front, wiggle whole body while open and closing hands)Ooh La La (hands in front, wiggle whole body while open and closing hands)Look out Brownies (pointing finger and moving it up and down)Look out Brownies (pointing finger and moving it up and down)Here we come (arms outstretched, encompassing the whole group)Here we come (arms outstretched, encompassing the whole group)We’re becoming Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)We’re becoming Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)Ooh La La (hands in front, wiggle whole body while open and closing hands)Ooh La La (hands in front, wiggle whole body while open and closing hands)We’ve worked so hard (swiping hand across brow)We’ve worked so hard (swiping hand across brow)All year long (hands open out front, palms pointed up)All year long (hands open out front, palms pointed up)We’re becoming Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)We’re becoming Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)Ooh La La (hands in front, wiggle whole body while open and closing hands)Ooh La La (hands in front, wiggle whole body while open and closing hands)Our time has come (tapping wrist as if pointing to a watch)Our time has come (tapping wrist as if pointing to a watch)We’ve crossed the bridge (fingers make walking movement in front of their face)When the timer rings, the Girl ScoutDaisies enter the oven through the backopening.We’ve crossed the bridge (fingers make walking movement in front of their face)Leader: (Open the oven door and thenew Girl Scout Brownies crawl out of theoven.)We are now Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)All girls: Look! A new batch of Girl ScoutBrownies!The newly-bridged Girl Scout Browniesare welcomed into the troop!6We are now Brownies (pointing thumb in chest)Ooh La La (hands in front, wiggle whole body while open and closing hands)Ooh La La (HAPPY DANCE – hands in front, wiggle whole body while open andclosing hands)

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout BrowniesA Girl Scout Brownie “flies up” to become a Girl Scout Junior. If possible, have yourfly-up ceremony with a Girl Scout Junior troop.Bridging/Fly-Up Ceremony #1 – Take My HandSupplies: Bridge, stepping stones, or archPreparation: Invite a Girl Scout Junior troop to help during the bridging ceremony.Inform them of the time and date of the ceremony and confirm theirattendance. Be sure to provide a script to them. If a Girl Scout Junior troop is not available, ask leaders or parents toparticipate and be sure to provide a script to them. Decorate a bridge, stepping stones, or an arch. Make sure each bridging girl has a Girl Scout Junior uniform with herfly-up wings. Help the girls practice.Formation: Begin with all Girl Scouts standing in front of the bridge. All Girl Scoutsread the poem together. The next part can be done a couple of ways. One way isto pair up the bridging Girl Scout Brownies, have them join hands, and walk acrossthe bridge together. Another way is to pair up a current Girl Scout Junior with eachbridging Girl Scout Brownie and have them join hands, and then cross the bridgetogether.Girl Scout JuniorBridging Poem(J. Brennan)Take my hand in friendshipI give to you this day.Remember all the good timesWe had along the way.Take my hand in helpingOther people that we know.The more we give to others,The more that we will grow.Take my hand in learningTo camp on nature’s ground.Enjoying trails and campfiresWith new friends that we’ve found.Take my hand in givingOur knowledge of true scoutsTo girls we meet and talk toWho have so many doubts.Take my hand in thankingOur leader and our guide.With sincere appreciationFor standing by our side.Take my hand in eagernessTo be an older scout.We’re proud to be bridgingIs what we’re going to shout.So take my hand to followNew scouting paths in sight.We’re joining hands with eachAnd in friendship we’ll unite.(In Unison)We give our hands in PromiseTo hold our country dear,And abide the Girl Scout LawEach day throughout the year!7

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout Brownies (continued)Bridging/Fly-Up Ceremony #2 – Stepping StonesThe Bridging CeremonySupplies:Girl Scout Brownie Leader:Brownies, you are just aboutTo become a Junior Girl Scout.Next year, you will findThat Juniors are true and kind.So we’ve given you Brownie WingsSo you may fly to bigger things.1. Brown construction paper, cut to represent stones2. Markers to write the Girl Scout Law onto the stonesPreparation: Invite a Girl Scout Junior troop to help during the bridging ceremony.Inform them of the time and date of the ceremony and confirm theirattendance. Be sure to provide a script to them. If a Girl Scout Junior troop is not available, ask leaders or parents toparticipate and be sure to provide a script to them. Decorate the construction paper stones. Make sure each bridging girl has a Girl Scout Brownie and Girl ScoutJunior uniform with her fly-up wings. Help the girls practice and know when their line is coming up.Formation: The Girl Scout Brownies sit on one side of the room in a Brownie Ring,wearing their Brownie vests. The Girl Scout Juniors sit in a horseshoe (always makethe open end toward the audience) on the other side of the room. Place your‘stepping stones’ between the two groups and tape them to the floor.Leader holds up a Girl Scout Juniorvest and points to the wings.Girl Scout Junior Leader: Hello there!Who are you dressed in brown withsuch cheerful smiles and not onefrown?Girl Scout Brownies:We are Girl Scout Brownies and we liketo have fun.Girl Scout Juniors we’d like to become.Girl Scout Junior Leader: By what rightdo you ask?Girl Scout Brownies: By the right of ourwings. (Point to their wings)Girl Scout Junior Leader: We see thatyou are ready to fly-up. Once you crossthe bridge we will welcome you as GirlScout Juniors. Please cross the bridgeone at a time.As each girl crosses, she is met by theGirl Scout Junior Leader and a GirlScout Junior. Her Girl Scout Brownievest or sash is removed and she isgiven her Girl Scout vest or sash andled to the horseshoe by the Girl ScoutJunior.Girl Scout Juniors:Welcome to Girl Scout JuniorsYou’re a Girl Scout Brownie nevermore.We’ll have lots of fun and lots of games,As we teach you Girl Scout lore.8

Bridging Ceremonies for Girl Scout Brownies (continued)Bridging/Fly-Up Ceremony #3 – Wings to FlySupplies: A large piece of cardboard to paint a tree branch and nest onto Bridge, stepping stones, or arch Cardboard wings for each girlPreparation: Make tree branch and nest. Make wings. Remind parents and guardians to have Girl Scout Junior vests ready. Practice the ceremony.Nest: Paint a big nest on a tree branch on one long side of a cardboard refrigeratorbox. Make it big enough to cover the entire cardboard piece. Brace the “nest” onthe ends so it will stand up (a triangle of 2x4s works great).Wings: Have each girl in the troop create her own “wings” by choosing what kindof bird she would like to be. Wings are worn across the back of each girl, coveringthe back of their arms, and extending about 6” beyond their fingertips. To wear thewings, the girls put their arms through loops of tape or straps that are attached tothe underside of the wings. Cut a basic wing outline out of heavy paper. Wings should be about 4 to 6feet long. Each girl paints both sides of her own wings like real birds’ wings or designtheir own. After the paint is dry, cover the underside of the wings with clear contactpaper. This adds strength to the wings and keeps paint from rubbing off onclothing (this side will be on the girls’ back). Make handle/loops – two pieces of heavy duty tape, one 15” and one 9”.Center the shorter piece on the longer piece

The Bridging Ceremony Leader or parent: As our Girl Scout Daisies prepared to bridge to Girl Scout Brownies we took the time to learn more about Girl Scouting and the Girl Scout Promise and Law. We’ve invited some friends to help us share what we learned.

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