Reef Life Survey Assessment Of Marine Biodiversity In .

3y ago
24 Views
2 Downloads
6.44 MB
43 Pages
Last View : 19d ago
Last Download : 6m ago
Upload by : Camryn Boren
Transcription

Reef Life Survey Assessmentof Marine Biodiversity inGeographe BayRick Stuart-Smith, Dani Ceccarelli, Paul Day, GrahamEdgar, Antonia Cooper, Liz Oh, Camille MellinReport to Parks Australia, Department of the Environment2020

CitationStuart-Smith RD, Ceccarelli DM, Day PB, Edgar GJ, Cooper AT, Oh ES, Mellin C (2020) Reef Life SurveyAssessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay. Reef Life Survey Foundation Incorporated.Copyright and disclaimer 2020 RLSF To the extent permitted by law, all rights are reserved and no part of this publication coveredby copyright may be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means except with the written permissionof The Reef Life Survey Foundation.Important disclaimerThe RLSF advises that the information contained in this publication comprises general statements based onscientific research. The reader is advised and needs to be aware that such information may be incompleteor unable to be used in any specific situation. No reliance or actions must therefore be made on thatinformation without seeking prior expert professional, scientific and technical advice. To the extentpermitted by law, The RLSF (including its volunteers and consultants) excludes all liability to any person forany consequences, including but not limited to all losses, damages, costs, expenses and any othercompensation, arising directly or indirectly from using this publication (in part or in whole) and anyinformation or material contained in it.ImagesCover: Sponge Gardens, Paul DayRemaining images: Page ii: Hypoplectrodes wilsoni, Hippo Creek, Paul Day, Page vii: Scorpaena sumptuosa,Squiggly Reef, Paul Day; Page 1: Trygonoptera ovalis, Hippo Creek, Paul Day; Page 23: Paristiopterusgallipavo, Hippo Creek, Paul Day, Page 24: Othos dentex, Hippo Creek, Paul Day; Page 26, ParaplesiopsMeleagris, Hippo Creek Paul Day.

1 ContentsExecutive summary . vi1Introduction . 12Methods . 23Results . 74Discussion .225Recommendations .236Acknowledgements .237References .25Appendices.27Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay iii

FiguresFigure 1. Stylised representation of method 1 survey technique . 3Figure 2. Stylised representation of method 2 survey technique . 3Figure 3. Map of the Geographe Bay sites surveyed in 2017 and 2019. . 6Figure 4. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot of reef fish biomass across all sites surveyed in 2017 vs2019, either coded by IUCN status (A) or sites (B; with arrows between 2017 to 2019), and performed onthe Bray-Curtis similarity matrix of the square-root transformed data (stress value 0.07). Speciesscores are shown on C). For clarity, species labels are only shown for species with the best fit. . 8Figure 5. Biomass in kg and species richness of reef fishes per 500 m2 transect at survey sites withinIUCN IV and IUCN VI zones of Geographe Bay. Error Bars 1 SE. 9Figure 6. Biomass in kg of functional group of reef fishes per 500 m2 transect within IUCN IV and IUCN VIsites. Error Bars 1 SE. . 11Figure 7. Biomass in kg per 500 m2 transect of large ( 20cm TL) reef fishes (left) and CommunityTemperature Index (right) within IUCN IV and IUCN VI in 2017 and 2019. Error Bars 1 SE. . 12Figure 8. Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) plot of mobile macroinvertebrate abundance across all sitessurveyed in 2017 vs 2019, either coded by IUCN status (A) or sites (B; with arrows between 2017 to2019), and performed on the Bray-Curtis similarity matrix of the square-root transformed data (stress 0.09). Species scores are shown on C). For clarity, species labels are only shown for species with the bestfit. 14Figure 9. Abundance and species richness of mobile macroinvertebrates per 100 m2 transect at surveysites within IUCN IV and IUCN VI zones of Geographe Bay. Error Bars 1 SE. . 15Figure 10. Total abundance of each phylum of mobile macroinvertebrates per 100 m2 transect at surveysites within IUCN IV and IUCN VI zones of Geographe Bay. Error Bars 1 SE. . 16Figure 11. Abundance and species richness of cryptic fishes per 100 m2 transect at survey sites withinIUCN IV and IUCN VI zones of Geographe Bay. Error Bars 1 SE. 17Figure 12. Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) plot of major benthic categories covers across all sitessurveyed in 2017 vs 2019, either coded by IUCN status (A) or sites (B; with arrows between 2017 to2019) and performed on the Bray-Curtis similarity matrix of the square-root transformed data (stress 0.05). Species scores are shown on C). For clarity, labels are only shown for benthic categories with thebest fit. 19Figure 13. Total live cover (%), total number of categories and percent cover of key benthic categories atsurvey sites within IUCN IV and IUCN VI zones of Geographe Bay. Error Bars 1 SE. Note that plots havedifferent y-axis scales. . 20iv Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay

TablesTable 1. PERMANOVA of fish community structure changes between 2017 and 2019 (Year) and betweenIUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 9Table 2. ANOVA of fish biomass and species richness changes between 2017 and 2019 (Year) andbetween IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 10Table 3. ANOVAs of the change in biomass of fish functional groups between 2017 and 2019, testing fordifferences between IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 12Table 4. ANOVAs of the biomass of large ( 20cm TL) reef fishes (B20) and Community TemperatureIndex (CTI) differences between 2017 and 2019 (Year) and between IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 13Table 5. PERMANOVA of invertebrate community structure changes between 2017 and 2019 (Year) andbetween IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 15Table 6. ANOVAs of the differences in abundance and species richness of invertebrates between 2017and 2019 (Year) and between IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 15Table 7. ANOVAs of the change in abundance and species richness of invertebrate phyla between 2017and 2019, testing for differences between IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 17Table 8. ANOVAs of the differences in the abundance and species richness of cryptic fishes between2017 and 2019 (Year) and between IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 18Table 9. PERMANOVA of benthic community structure changes between 2017 and 2019 (Year) andbetween IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. . 20Table 10. ANOVAs of the differences in the cover of different benthic categories between 2017 and 2019(Year) and between IUCN IV and IUCN VI sites. CCA: Crustose coralline algae. . 21List of acronymsACRONYMEXPANDEDAMP/CMRAustralian Marine Park/ Commonwealth Marine ReserveRLSFThe Reef Life Survey FoundationMPAMarine Protected AreaIUCNInternational Union for Conservation of NatureRLSReef Life SurveyEEZExclusive Economic ZoneCTICommunity Temperature IndexReef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay v

Executive summaryThe Geographe Marine Park is one of 14 Australian Marine Parks established in the South-west MarineParks Network (SWMPN), which emcompasses an area of 508,371 km2 within the South-west MarineRegion that extends from eastern Kangaroo Island, South Australia, to 70 km offshore of Shark Bay,Western Australia (WA). Four zoning categories exist within the Geographe Marine Park: HabitatProtection (IUCN IV), Multiple Use (IUCN VI), Special Purpose (Mining Exclusion, IUCN VI) and National Park(IUCN II) zones (Parks Australia 2019). There has been very little research in the Geographe Marine Park tohelp understand differences in biodiversity values protected in each of these zones and provide adequatebaselines for future evaluation of management effectiveness. This report presents the findings of Reef LifeSurvey (RLS) surveys conducted in 2017 and 2019, which targeted reef habitats in two zoning categoriesbefore and just following implementation of the Geographe Marine Park.Fish, macroinvertebrate and benthic communities in Geographe Marine Park changed little between 2017and 2019, both in the Habitat Protection (IUCN IV) and Multiple Use (IUCN VI) zones. Minor changesobserved reflected largely idiosyncratic trends associated with the small number of surveys (only four siteswere surveyed; two in each zone). The similarity in reef communities between years in both zones wasexpected because the park management plan was formally implemented less than a year prior to the 2019surveys (i.e. there was insufficient time for any ‘management effect’), and because no sites were within theNational Park Zone in the final zoning scheme (IUCN II, with greater fishing restrictions). Stability in fishbiomass and Community Temperature Index values suggested no substantial human or environmentallydriven changes occurred between the 2017 and 2019 surveys either. The high similarity between sitessuggests that sites within the Multiple Use Zone are well matched to the Habitat Protection Zone sites interms of habitat and reef communities, and should therefore act as good reference sites. Similarly, the lackof major differences between years suggests that the overall period investigated should provide a goodbaseline against which future change can be assessed.MANAGEMENT AND RESEARCH RECOMMENDATIONSWe recommend that: ongoing monitoring of shallow reef habitat in the Geographe Marine Park should ideally take placeon annual to biennial basis, using methods consistent with baseline surveys described here and; survey effort should be increased to include at least two sites within the National Park Zone,assuming suitable habitat can be found.vi Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay

Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay vii

2 IntroductionGeographe Bay is a large, sheltered embayment located 270 km south of Perth, Western Australia. Theseabed is varied, and consists of a limestone substratum covered in sand and occasionally protruding in theform of small patch reefs, interspersed with extensive seagrass beds that cover 70% of the bay (McMahonet al. 1997). The seagrass meadows in the bay are among the largest and most continuous temperateseagrass in Australia, with at least ten different seagrass species recorded (McMahon et al. 1997). A lowlimestone reef ridge runs parallel to the shore in seagrass at approximately 16 m depth (Westera et al.2009). The bay also hosts a high diversity of fish species (White et al. 2011).The Geographe Marine Park is one of 14 Australian Marine Parks established in the South-west MarineParks Network (SWMPN). The SWMPN includes Commonwealth waters from the eastern end of KangarooIsland, South Australia, to 70 km offshore of Shark Bay, Western Australia (WA), encompassing a total areaof 508,371 km2. The Geographe Marine Park covers 977 km2, and a depth range of approximately 15 to 40m within Geographe Bay. Three zoning categories exist within the Geographe Marine Park: HabitatProtection (IUCN IV), Multiple Use (IUCN VI), Special Purpose (Mining Exclusion, IUCN VI) and National Park(IUCN II) zones (Parks Australia 2019). The conservation values listed specifically for this Marine Parkinclude foraging areas for seabirds, migratory habitat for humpback whales and blue whales (Recalde-Salaset al. 2014), seagrass beds (White et al. 2011), rock lobster habitat (MacArthur et al. 2007), and highbenthic productivity and biodiversity.There has been very little research done in the Geographe Marine Park to help understand the biodiversityvalues encompassed within the different levels of protection. Reef Life Survey (RLS) first surveyed theisolated reef ridge in 2009, which found the associated fauna to be quite different to the inshore sitesmonitored by RLS and the Australian Temperate Reef Collaboration (including the University of Tasmaniaand WA Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions). Following the subsequent zoning planfor the new Geographe Marine Park, RLS surveyed two sites along this reef within the proposed NationalPark Zone in 2017, and two within the Multiple Use Zone to provide reference sites. Very little shallow reefexists within the Park, making a more comprehensive survey design difficult. These four sites wereresurveyed in 2019, however the zones were changed for the final management plan, leaving the RLSmonitoring sites within the Habitat Protection Zone (2 sites) and the Multiple Use Zone (2 sites). No siteswere surveyed in the new National Park Zone. This report presents the findings of the 2017 and 2019surveys, examining data from reef habitat in two levels of zoning before and just following formalestablishment of the Geographe Marine Park. While the report is as comprehensive as possible, only foursites were surveyed, so it is necessarily brief.Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay 1

3 MethodsReef Life Survey (RLS) dive teams surveyed 8 transects in 2017 and 11 transects in 2019, spread over 4 siteswithin the Geographe Marine Park (Figure 3, Appendix 1). All surveys were conducted using thestandardised underwater visual census methods applied globally by Reef Life Survey. RLS involvesrecreational divers trained to a scientific level of data-gathering to make it possible to conduct ecologicalsurveys across broad geographic areas in a cost-effective manner. RLS divers partner with managementagencies and university researchers to undertake detailed assessment of biodiversity on coral and rockyreefs, but all divers and boat crew do so in a voluntary capacity. A summary of these methods is providedhere. Full details can be downloaded at: sManual 15042013.pdf.Each RLS survey involves three distinct searches undertaken along a 50 m transect line, for: (i) fishes, (ii)invertebrates and cryptic fishes, and (iii) sessile organisms such as corals and macroalgae (describedindividually below). Two transects were usually surveyed at each site for this study, on predominantly coralreef habitat, and generally parallel at different depths. Depth contours were restricted by depth variationsin individual reefs, but where possible were selected to encompass a wide depth range (e.g. 2 – 20 m).Constraints associated with diving bottom time and air consumption generally limited depths to above 20m. Underwater visibility and depth were recorded at the time of each survey, with visibility measured asthe furthest distance at which large objects could be seen along the transect line, and depth as the depth(m) contour followed by the diver when setting the transect line.FISH SURVEYS (METHOD 1)All fish species sighted within 5 m x 50 m blocks either side of the transect line were recorded onwaterproof paper as divers swam slowly along the line. The number and estimated size-category of eachspecies were also recorded. Size categories used were 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400,500, 625 mm, and 125 mm categories above, which represent total fish length (from snout to tip of tail). Allspecies sighted within the blocks were recorded, including those with unknown identity. Photographs wereused to later confirm identities with appropriate taxonomic experts, as necessary. In occasionalcircumstances when no photograph was available, taxa were recorded to the highest taxonomic resolutionfor which there was confidence (e.g. genus or family, if not species). Other large pelagic animals such asmammals, sea snakes, turtles and cephalopods are also recorded during the Method 1 fish survey, but notconsidered here in analyses focusing on fishes. Species observed outside the boundaries of the surveyblocks or after the fish survey had been completed were recorded as ‘Method 0’. Such records are apresence record for the time and location but were not used in quantitative analyses at the site level.‘Method 0’ sightings were also made of invertebrates and any other notable taxonomic groups.2 Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay

Figure 1. Stylised representation of method 1 survey techniqueMACROINVERTEBRATE AND CRYPTIC FISH SURVEYS (METHOD 2)Large macroinvertebrates (echinoderms, and molluscs and crustaceans 2.5 cm) and cryptic fishes weresurveyed along the same transect lines set for fish surveys. Divers swam near the seabed, up each side ofthe transect line, recording all mobile macroinvertebrates and cryptic fishes on the reef surface within 1 mof the line. This required searching along crevices and undercuts, but without moving rocks or disturbingcorals. Cryptic fishes include those from particular pre-defined families that are inconspicuous and closelyassociated with the seabed (and are thus disproportionately overlooked during general Method 1 fishsurveys). The global list of families defined as cryptic for the purpose of RLS surveys can be found in theonline methods manual. As data from Method 2 were collected in blocks of a different width to that usedfor Method 1 and were analysed separately from those data, individuals of cryptic fishes known to alreadybe recorded on Method 1 were still recorded as part of Method 2. Sizes were estimated for cryptic fishesusing the same size classes as for Method 1.Figure 2. Stylised representation of method 2 survey techniqueReef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay 3

PHOTO-QUADRATS OF BENTHIC COVER (METHOD 3)Information on the percentage cover of sessile animals and macroalgae along the transect lines set for fishand invertebrate surveys were recorded using photo-quadrats taken every 2.5 m along the 50 m transect.Digital photo-quadrats were taken vertically-downward from a height sufficient to encompass an area ofapproximately 0.3 m x 0.3 m.The percentage cover of different macroalgal, coral, sponge and other attached invertebrate species wasobtained from photo-q

Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay. Citation . Stuart-Smith RD, Ceccarelli DM, Day PB, Edgar GJ, Cooper AT, Oh ES, Mellin C (2020) Reef Life Survey Assessment of Marine Biodiversity in Geographe Bay. Reef Life Survey Foundation Incorporated.

Related Documents:

Reef Life Survey Assessment of Coral Reef Biodiversity in the Northst Marine Parks Network-we. Citation . Edgar GJ, Mellin C, Turak E, Stuart-Smith RD, Cooper AT, Ceccarelli DM (2020) Reef Life Survey Assessment of Coral Reef Biodiversity in the North-west Marine Parks Network . Reef Life Survey Foundation

3. On the board or another place that will be visible throughout the class, have students brainstorm differences between the different reef classifications (fringing reef, barrier reef, atoll, and patch reef). 4. Hand out Lesson 2: Reef Typing student worksheet. 5. Assign groups of 2-3 students and give each group a copy of Appendix A: Reef .

Reef Life Survey Assessment of Coral Reef Biodiversity in the Coral Sea v Executive summary Australias oral Sea borders the Great arrier Reef, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia and the Tasman Front. Globally, the Coral Sea is considered to be among the last remaining pristine seas with relatively low human impact.

limestone, shale, and sandstone units. The Capitan Reef Complex geologic model of fore-reef, reef, and back-reef facies was described in detail by King (1948) and is illustrated in Figure 3, by Melim and Scholle (1999). The Capitan Reef Complex is exposed in outcrops in the Guadalupe Mountains (Eddy County,

Investing in the Great Barrier Reef The Great Barrier Reef is the world's best managed reef. Only the Coalition Government will keep it that way. We understand not only the importance of protecting the Reef, but of ensuring the Reef economy stays strong and resilient for generations to come.

c. Wave-driven flow thru reef & lagoon i. Waves break on fore reef, create pressure gradient over reef flat & lagoon, drive current that exits lagoon thru gaps in reef (Hearn 1999) ii. Flow over reef, thru lagoon shapes community distribution & production by controlling nutrient supply & turbulence 14

4 ICRI Report 2019 Live Reef Food Fish Trade Y Sadovy ICRI Report 2019 Live Reef Food Fish Trade Y Sadovy 5 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The international live reef food fish trade (LRFFT) started . reef fish is small by global fishery standards, estimated to be in the order of 20,000-30,000 metric tonnes (t), . Australia and the Maldives and a few .

to AGMA 9 standard, improved the quality and performance of the QE range. Today, the QE Vibrator not only meets industry expectations, but will out-perform competitive models when correctly selected and operated in line with the information given in this brochure. When a QE Vibrator is directly attached to a trough it is referred to as a “Brute Force” design. It is very simple to calculate .