Simply Charlotte Mason Presents Parables

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Simply Charlotte Mason presentsParablesBible Picture Portfoliosby Emily Kiser

With Bible Picture Portfoliosyou have everything you need to present enjoyable Bible lessonsin a school Bible class, family devotions, or Sunday School. Thebeautiful art combined with the Bible accounts will influence andenrich your students more than you can imagine.In this book you will find Eight Bible passages from the book or theme of this portfolio. BothEnglish Standard Version (ESV) and King James Version (KJV) areincluded for you to choose from. Simple step-by-step instructions that explain how to use the artwork toenrich Bible lessons with all ages. Helpful Leading Thoughts that will allow you to point out details andengage in discussion about each picture. A brief biographical sketch of each artist to share with your students asdesired. Cross references to related works in other Bible Picture Portfolios andPicture Study Portfolios, so you can easily expand or extend your Biblestudy.SimplyCharlotte Mason.com

Parablesby Emily KiserTo be used with the Bible Picture Portfolio: Parablespublished by Simply Charlotte Mason

Bible Picture Portfolio: Parables 2020 by Emily KiserAll rights reserved. However, we grant permission to make printed copies or use this work on multipleelectronic devices for members of your immediate household. Quantity discounts are available forclassroom and co-op use. Please contact us for details.Scripture quotations marked “ESV” are from the ESV Bible (The Holy Bible, English StandardVersion ), copyright 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used bypermission. All rights reserved.ISBN 978-1-61634-490-0 printedISBN 978-1-61634-491-7 electronic downloadPublished bySimply Charlotte Mason, LLC930 New Hope Road #11-892Lawrenceville, Georgia 30045simplycharlottemason.comPrinted by PrintLogic, Inc.Monroe, Georgia, USA

ContentsAbout Bible Picture Portfolios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5How to Use Bible Picture Portfolios. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7Introductory Note. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9The Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30–37). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10The Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11–32). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13The Parable of the Sower (Mark 4:1–20; also Matthew 13:3–23 and Luke 8:4–15).16The Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1–16). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19The Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19–31). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21The Parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1–13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24The Parable of the Hidden Treasure (Matthew 13:44) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26The Parable of the Unforgiving Servant (Matthew 18:23–35). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

ParablesAbout Bible Picture PortfoliosIn Home Education, Charlotte Mason suggested that parents give their childrenreverent pictures to look at—art that illustrates the Bible stories read from Scripture.She said, “The study of such pictures should be a valuable part of a child’s education;it is no slight thing to realise how the Nativity and the visit of the Wise Men filled theimagination of the early Masters, and with what exceeding reverence and delight theydwelt upon every detail of the sacred story. [T]he child who gets it in early days, willhave a substratum of reverent feeling upon which should rest his faith” (Home Education,p. 252). In keeping with this advice, these Bible Portfolios have been produced, in orderto make the selection of profitable pictures easy and to include the relevant Scripturetexts that accompany the stories.Miss Mason recommended that a simple picture study be done with these pictures,allowing the children a few moments to carefully and quietly observe the painting.Afterwards, turn the picture over and give them the chance to “say what they have seenin it” (Home Education, p. 253). She cautioned that parents and teachers shouldn’t givethe interpretation of the picture, nor drive home the points of the story, but instead,“let the pictures tell their own tale” (p. 253).These portfolios have been created for all those interested in giving their studentsbiblical art to study and enjoy: Teachers may use these portfolios for Bible lessons during school time. Families can benefit from adding them into their devotions or family worship. Sunday School teachers can use them with their classes to bring high-qualityartwork and picture study to children who may not regularly be exposed to it.We hope these portfolios help make this aspect of the great feast of a CharlotteMason education easy to implement and enjoy!simplycharlottemason.com5

ParablesHow to Use Bible Picture PortfoliosAs in other Bible lessons, the Scripture passage should be read and narrated first.This is the one lesson in which Miss Mason encouraged children to use the exact wordsthey heard in their narrations; and as these words are the inspired word of God, it’s nowonder! Two translations for each Scripture passage are included in this portfolio: theEnglish Standard Version (ESV) and the King James Version (KJV). You are welcometo use whichever version your family, school, or church prefers.After the passage has been narrated, show the students the corresponding pictureand allow them to observe it carefully for a few minutes in silence. Encourage thechildren to make a picture of it in their mind. After this quiet time of studying thepicture, turn it over and have them share what they’ve seen. This is all that is necessaryto enjoy and learn from the artwork.Some Leading Thoughts have been included for each picture that give a bit moreinformation about each piece. The biographical information may be shared with yourstudents before looking at the picture to arouse their sympathy with the artist. Theother information may prove interesting and useful for the teacher: a painting’s historyhas been shared if it is of particular interest, optional prompts for discussion have beengiven, and some details that may be unclear have been explained. Teachers should feelfree to use the Leading Thoughts with their students if they ask questions or would liketo know more about the artwork, but it is perfectly fine to enjoy the picture withoutusing these additional materials.To recap,1. Read the Scripture passage.2. Have the children narrate the passage, using words as close to the text as possible.simplycharlottemason.com7

Bible Picture Portfolio3. Show the artwork to the children, possibly sharing a bit about the artist whopainted the piece, and allow a few quiet moments to closely examine the painting.4. Turn the picture over and ask the children to tell what they saw in it—not onlya description of what it looked like, but also anything it made them think of inlight of the Scripture passage just read.5. Optionally, share some interesting idea from the Leading Thoughts section aboutthe piece, or invite the students into a discussion using the prompts in the text asthey are interested and engaged.8simplycharlottemason.com

ParablesIntroductory NoteIn Home Education, Charlotte Mason recommended learning Bible passages by heart,beginning when children were quite young—six or seven years old. She mentionedparables as being a good place to start. Children are naturally more interested in andable to remember stories, so these short narrative accounts told by Christ are a greatintroduction to Scripture memory. With this in mind, we have produced this portfoliodedicated to the parables of Christ. It can be used in conjunction with the Gospelportfolios, placing each story in the context of the specific Gospel being read, or as astand alone study.simplycharlottemason.com9

Bible Picture PortfolioThe Parable of the Good SamaritanThe Good Samaritan (After Delecroix) by Vincent van Gogh1890, oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cmKröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, The Netherlands1. Read the Bible passage in the translation of your choice.Luke 10:30–37 (ESV)Jesus replied, “A man was going down fromJerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers,who stripped him and beat him and departed,leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest wasgoing down that road, and when he saw him hepassed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite,when he came to the place and saw him, passed byon the other side. But a Samaritan, as he journeyed,came to where he was, and when he saw him, hehad compassion. He went to him and bound uphis wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he sethim on his own animal and brought him to an innand took care of him. And the next day he tookout two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper,saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever moreyou spend, I will repay you when I come back.’Which of these three, do you think, proved to be aneighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?”He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” AndJesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.”Luke 10:30–37 (KJV)And Jesus answering said, A certain man wentdown from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell amongthieves, which stripped him of his raiment, andwounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead.And by chance there came down a certain priestthat way: and when he saw him, he passed by onthe other side. And likewise a Levite, when he wasat the place, came and looked on him, and passedby on the other side. But a certain Samaritan, ashe journeyed, came where he was: and when hesaw him, he had compassion on him, and went to10him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil andwine, and set him on his own beast, and broughthim to an inn, and took care of him. And on themorrow when he departed, he took out two pence,and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Takecare of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more,when I come again, I will repay thee. Which nowof these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour untohim that fell among the thieves? And he said, Hethat shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus untohim, Go, and do thou likewise.simplycharlottemason.com

Parables2. Ask for a narration of the Bible passage.3. Show the picture, tell about the artist if desired, and allow a few minutes tostudy it.Vincent Van Gogh was born in the Netherlands in 1853. In his short career as anartist, only the last 10 years of his life, Van Gogh produced nearly 900 oil paintings.As the son of a minister, Van Gogh initially pursued a career as a minister. Althoughhis early ambition did not succeed, many of his pieces are religious in nature, andsome, like this painting of the Good Samaritan, are copies, or rather, translations ofpieces by other prominent artists. This painting was completed in the final year of hislife.4. Turn the picture over and ask students to tell what they saw.5. (optional) Share some or all of these Leading Thoughts.Van Gogh modeled this painting after a work by Eugène Delacroix, a Frenchartist. Van Gogh’s is a mirror image of Delacroix’s, and Van Gogh’s painting style isquite different. If you’d like, you can compare the two pieces. (See the next page.)What details did the artist include that let us know this is a painting of the parableJesus told?The road from Jerusalem to Jericho was only about 18 miles long, but a travelerwould descend more than 3,000 feet in elevation. This route was fraught with dangerand was notorious as a hideout for robbers. Reflect on how Jesus used this well-knownfact His audience would have been familiar with to set the stage for the spirituallesson He wished to impart.simplycharlottemason.com11

Bible Picture Portfolio: Parablessimplycharlottemason.com

him, Go, and do thou likewise. simplycharlottemason.com 11 Parables 2. Ask for a narration of the Bible passage. 3. Show the picture, tell about the artist if desired, and allow a few minutes to study it. Vincent Van Gogh was born in the Netherlands in 1853. In his short career as an

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