Chalk Cliffs On Rügen Casper David Friedrich

2y ago
18 Views
2 Downloads
3.87 MB
20 Pages
Last View : 3d ago
Last Download : 5m ago
Upload by : Macey Ridenour
Transcription

7th Grade: SEPTEMBERChalk Cliffs on RügenCasper David Friedrich 2013 Debra J. Herman, M.F.A., All Rights ReservedFunded by the John and Frances Beck Foundation, Chicago, IllinoisEdited by Constance Kammrath, M.A.About the ArtistThe following information is provided to give classroom teachersa comprehensive understanding of the artist and artwork. Useyour judgment on what to share with your students based on theirlevel of curiosity, observation/inquiry skills, comprehension andage-appropriateness.Casper David FriedrichCasper David Friedrich was born in Griefswald, Germany, justnorth of Berlin, on September 5, 1774. He was the sixth of tenchildren born to Adolf Gottlieb Friedrich, a soap and candle maker, and Sophie Dorothea Bechly from Neubrandenburg. Friedrichand his siblings were raised under the strict Protestant faith, afoundation that influenced Friedrich throughout his life.Casper David Friedrich’s childhood was traumatic. His motherdied when he was just seven years old. His sister, Elizabeth, diedof smallpox one year later. However, his most traumatic experience came at thirteen years old when he fell through a thin layerof ice on a frozen lake. His brother, Johann Christoffer, tried tosave him and in doing so, Johann drowned. Five years after hisbrother passed away his second sister, Maria, died from typhus.The surviving Friedrich children were cared for by the housekeeper, Mother Heide, who developed a loving relationship withthe children in contrast with the ridged and tense relationshipthey had with their father who was known as an upright moralist.For Friedrich, his personal experiences with a strict father andwith death at such an early age gave him an intense sense of guilt,personal loss and loneliness which he carried into adulthood.materialism, hence the German Romantic movement began.While at the Royal Academy, Friedrich made little artistic progress. He blamed this on his schooling but others said he wassimply a late bloomer. In 1798 Friedrich decided he was ready tomove away from his academic teaching to find his own independent voice as a painter.After a short visit in Greifswald to see family and friends, Friedrich moved on to Dresden, Germany, which was considered thehub for the newly formed German Romantic movement. Friedrich fell in love with the buildings, the art, and the surroundingbeautiful nature. Soon he began an intensive study capturingscenes of nature in sketchbooks but, revealing a less than idealdrawing ability. He gradually pulled away from his former teachers’ styles to develope his own, unique style, all the while improving his drawing ability.Portraiture was his first effort in Dresden and Friedrich madeimprovements, largely due to the influence of one of the mostfamous portrait painters, Anton Graff. Friedrich preferred to drawwith pencil or chalk and occasionally used a brown ink calledsepia. He moved on to draw other objects, such as boats andeventually landscapes, adding his sepia washes. His work improved with greater detail and finally, in 1807, Friedrich gainedenough confidence to pick up a paintbrush for his first oil painting. Friedrich’s advancing skills became apparent in his allegorical landscapes; objects in his art symbolized concepts such as asnake signifying evil or a sun signifying the presence of God.Friedrich decided to focus his paintings on landscapes. His formula included an outdoor environment that held vast, open spaces with a sun or moon illuminating the clouds or seascape. Usually he added an isolated figure placed before ancient ruins. It wasalso common for Friedrich to use a landscape allegory to reference a religious concept. Sometimes he even placed a cross in hislandscape. While wealthy patrons enjoyed Friedrich’s work, itdid receive some negative criticism. Noted critic F.W.B. vanRamdohr did not appreciate Friedrich’s placement of religiousFriedrich shifted his studies in 1794 to the liberal Royal Academy symbolism in his landscapes. The debates on this issue in socialsettings among the wealthy and intelligent only increased Frieof Fine Arts in Copenhagen known for drawing from nature radrich’s notoriety and reputation. Friedrich was intentional aboutther than copying works of the masters. At this time, Friedrichwas introduced to Gotthard Ludwig Kosegarten, a poet and theo- adding a theme of faith and hope to his work, most likely a themewhich helped him through his difficult childhood years. Lightlogian who claimed God revealed Himself equally in Scriptureand in nature and that an experience in nature was an experience penetrating the darkness, temples ruins of the past making waywith God. Therefore, the role of the artist was to mediate between for the future, contemplation of nature, the insignificance of thehuman amidst expansive space are some of the messages includGod and man, and in a landscape painting, this relationship haded in his landscapes.to be felt, not simply represented. Drama and emotion had tomerge on the canvas. This philosophy complimented a desireFriedrich’s reputation grew especially when he won recognitiongrowing across Europe to become more spiritual and to rejectThe small town of Greifswald had scarcely changed in two hundred years and was void of the intellectual and artistic stimulusFriedrich sought until he met Johann Gottfried Quistorp, a formerarchitect turned Professor of Drawing at the University of Heidelburg. Quistorp instructed Friedrich in drawing for a number ofyears and raised his interest in landscape painting, a new formaway from the traditional portraiture.

Discipline-Based Art EducationThe following components are integral to students having a complete, well rounded artexperience.Art AestheticsProviding opportunities to develop perception and appreciation of visually expressedideas and experiences.Art ProductionProviding opportunities to develop skills andtechniques for creative visual expressions ofemotions and ideas.Art HistoryProviding opportunities to develop an understanding of the visual arts as a basic component of personal heritage.Art CriticismProviding an opportunity to develop anintellectual basis for analyzing and makingaesthetic judgments based on an understanding of visual ideas and experiences.ELEMENTS OF ART Line: A continuous mark Shape: Area enclosed by a line Color: Hue, reflection of light. Texture: Surface quality, real or implied Form: 3D shape or illusion of 3D Value: Graduated areas of light/dark Space: Illusion of depthPRINCIPLES OF DESIGN Repetition: Imagery repeating pattern Variety: Contrast/variation Rhythm: Issues of eye movement Balance: Even visual weight Emphasis/Economy: Dominance/minimalism Proportion: Compare size relationshipsCOMPOSITION Symmetrical: Mirrored imagery Asymmetrical: Random placement Radial: Mirror image from center point Repetition: Repeating pattern, motifARTISTIC STYLES Realism: Realistic representation Abstraction: Personal interpretation Non-Objective: No recognizable depictionELEMENTS OF DESIGN IN PICTUREBOOKSChildren’s literature that relate to this lessondue to elements of art or story content are: Casper Friedrich by Werner Hofmann andMary Whittall Casper David Friedrich and the Subject ofLandscape: Second Edition by Kate DiCamillo German Romantic Painting: Second Editionby Joseph Leo KoernerREFERENCE/BIBLIOGRAPHY Jensen, Jens Christian. Casper DavidFriedrich: Life and Work. Barron’s Woodbury, NY/London. 1981 Russo, Raffaella, Casper David Friedrich,Caroline Hunt, Louise Candlish, Anna Kruger. Friedrich. Dorling Kindersley. 1999 Schmied, Weiland. Casper David Friedrich.H.N. Abrams. 1995 Wolf, Norbert. Casper David Friedrich: 1774-1840: The Painter of Stillness. Taschen.2003at the Weimar competition. He worked especially hard during his time in Dresden andadvanced his skill level to the point that hesold his own works of paintings, drawings andengravings. He supplemented his income bygiving art lessons to children and guidingtours throughout Saxony. Friedrich’s nameeventually became well-known throughoutSaxony as the most important German Romantic painter. He gained membership in theBerlin Academy in 1810.In 1818, Friedrich married Carolina Bommer,daughter of a dyer from Dresden. Three children were born to the couple. After the marriage, color tones became brighter, symmetrywas less rigid and the first female figure appeared on the canvas.4.Friedrich suffered a stroke in 1835, leavingsome paralysis in his limbs and causing hiscareer to come to a gradual end. By 1838, helost any capacity to work, leaving him supported by the charity of his friends. He eventually died in 1840 at the age of sixty-six.6.5.Things to Do1.About the ArtChalk Cliffs on Rügen was painted in oil oncanvas by Casper David Friedrich in 1818 andis 35.6 by 27.9 inches. It is in the collection ofthe Museum Osker Reinhart am Stadtgarten inZurich, Switzerland.2.Friedrich and his new wife honeymooned onthe island of Rügen in 1818. This paintingdepicts the view of the Baltic Sea from thefamous lookout points from the chalk cliffs.The composition of the painting is a compilation of various areas of on the island.a symbol of humility. He is dressed inblue, the color of faith. He gazes into theopening before him and seeks footing forfear of slipping off into death. The otherfigure is Friedrich’s brother, dressed ingreen, symbolic of hope. The female figure, dressed in red symbolic of love, isFriedrich’s wife. She sits beside a bare,dried bush which has leaves only near herface. Faith, hope and love are the threeChristian virtues. Respond to this use ofsymbolism.Friedrich believed God was present in allof nature and desired to paint in such away as to portray God’s presence.This particular painting used the elementof space—the illusion of depth. How doeshe achieve this and how does it enrich thescene?If you were to make a symbolic drawingor painting, what message would it haveand how would you symbolize it?3.Directed ObservationShow students an image of Chalk Cliffs onRügen and tell them it was painted in oil byCasper David Friedrich in 1818. Invite students to quietly study the work. After sometime for thinking, encourage students to sharewhat they see. Welcome all comments. Thefollowing are suggested questions to help students use art vocabulary to talk about thework.1. Friedrich was a very disciplined artistwho worked with imagery placed in theforeground, mid-ground and background. 4.Identify those items placed in the foreground, those placed in the mid-groundand what makes up the background of thepainting. How does this approach create5.depth?2. How is the scene framed?3. Symbolism was also a theme in Friedrich’s painting. The figure in the middleis Friedrich with his hat on the ground asFriedrich sketched and created sepiapaintings of his subject matter. The sepiapaint allowed him to plan for the depth oflight and dark tones. Identify a landscapenear you and make a sketch which has aheightened sensitivity to light and darktones.Use your imagination or draw from nature (or a cityscape) a scene which has adistinctive foreground, mid-ground andbackground. Consider the same scene indifferent seasons.Using a 3 x 5 inch index card, verticallyor horizontally, create a drawing or painting which features the element of space—the illusion of depth. This could be anlandscape or cityscape, an interior spacewith a window that offers a view of adistant lake and hills. It could be an outdoor scene which features pasture closeand continuing far into the distance. Keytechniques for creating depth: items in thedistance are smaller, lighter in color and“behind” items in the foreground whichare bolder in color and larger. When completed, exhibit the “miniature” collection.See whose work “traveled” the farthestdistance.Choose a movie you enjoyed and identifya particular scene or two in the movie andre-design the set. Sketch out new possibilities for the set and improve upon theelement of depth.Imagine a special outdoor setting thatyou’d love to visit. Draw it in a very appealing manner to entice others to visit.Appeal to their senses and emotions byincluding aspects that makes it special.

7th Grade: OctoberParis Street; Rainy DayGustave Caillebotte 2013 Debra J. Herman, M.F.A., All Rights ReservedFunded by the John and Frances Beck Foundation, Chicago, IllinoisEdited by Constance Kammrath, M.A.About the ArtistThe following information is provided to give classroom teachersa comprehensive understanding of the artist and artwork. Useyour judgment on what to share with your students based on theirlevel of curiosity, observation/inquiry skills, comprehension andage-appropriateness.became the steward of a substantial fortune which supported hisdesires to be an artist. An 1875 rejection from the annual Salonexhibition solidified Caillebotte’s relationship with the Impressionists as they all shared rejection from the Salon. One year laterhe participated in the second group Impressionist exhibition witheight paintings, five of which are very famous today.Within a year, Caillebotte’s twenty six year-old brother, Renedied, leaving Caillebotte in fear of a premature death himself.This fear prompted him to execute a will which provided generous support for the next Impressionist exhibition and he bequeathed to France a large number of Impressionist works he hadpreviously purchased and collected from his friends. Caillebottewas not interested in buying work from his friends as a charitableact for them. Rather, he had such a great eye to evaluate the workas quality art and confidently knew it would maintain its value.His only request was that these works of art would be exhibitedin Paris museums and eventually in the world-renowned LouvreMuseum. Many museums originally rejected the idea becausethey shared a dislike for the Impressionist work. From today’sperspective, the gifts of art were a generous gesture which had alasting impact on the collections in art museums today, especiallyArt was an important activity for Caillebotte but law was his cho- the Louvre in Paris.sen profession. During his law schooling, he was called up forThe subsequent years were driven with a high energy to producemilitary duty in the Franco-Prussian war but his father was ableto buy insurance to delay the process. Caillebotte continued with work, probably driven by his fear of an early death. The 1877Impressionist Exhibition was a success in the quality and cohehis schooling, earning a law degree and license to practice in1870, the same year he was again drafted in the Franco-Prussian siveness of work exhibited. In his usual generous manner, Caillebotte financially and physically supported the exhibition, publiWar. As a result of the war and subsequent establishment of anew French government, Caillebotte was emotionally scarred. He cized the event, hung the artwork and purchased some of hispeers’ work. Caillebotte also submitted his own paintings to thisabandoned his law career and turned to painting, entering thestudio of French Salon master Léon Bonnet. Under Bonnet’s tute- exhibition, which were well received by critics.lage, Caillebotte was exposed to a realist approach with a verylight hand and looser brush strokes. Caillebotte’s skills improved Being associated with a specific artistic movement may requireand gave him high hopes of acceptance into the Ecole des Beaux- conformity to shared perspectives. However, Caillebotte maintained his own identity and uniqueness serving his own visionArts (School of Fine Arts). While he was accepted, he wasranked in the mid-range of students attending and because of that, and subject matter. Differing from the Impressionistic approach,Caillebotte chose to paint on large canvases, was committed toCaillebotte did not attend classes regularly.painting modern, urban life in Paris, painted in a tighter formatwith smoother brushstrokes and often used darker grey tones. HeBonnet was a friend of painters Degas, Monet, Renoir, Pissaro,Cézanne and others who would come to be known as the Impres- delighted in the perspective of streets and buildings and the peosionists. The post war political climate was accepting of innova- ple who walked among them.tive artists but the work of the Impressionists was ill-received aslacking substance and execution. An Impressionist exhibition in His mother, Céleste Caillebotte, died in 1878 leaving Caillebotte1874 attracted Caillebotte to attend as a viewer. It is at this point to mourn again and deal with the family estate including sellingmany homes. Three years later, Caillebotte purchased a home inhe realized his potential.Petit-Gennevilliers on the banks of the Seine River and took upCaillebotte’s father died unexpectedly on Christmas Day in 1874, boating. With the fear of death constantly on his mind, he turnedhis attention from painting to gardening and yachting.leaving the family fortune to his sons. Caillebotte immediatelyGustave CaillebotteGustave Caillebotte born August 19, 1948, in Paris, France, wasthe first of three sons of Martial Caillebotte and Céleste Daufresne. His father’s inherited wealth came from a large business thatmanufactured bedding for the military. The sizable income provided his family a wealthy lifestyle. Martial also served as ajudge of the Commercial Tribunal and invested in real estate,including a vacation home to the south of Paris in the small townof Yerres. The beautiful gardens, pavilions, greenhouses and general countryside with sights of the nearby river were a welcomerelief from the busyness of Paris. Young Caillebotte loved todraw and found this place filled with inspirational images including the local floral and fauna. In addition to drawing and painting, he and his family engaged in everyday recreational activities.

Discipline-Based Art EducationThe following components are integral to students having a complete, well rounded artexperience.Art AestheticsProviding opportunities to develop perception and appreciation of visually expressedideas and experiences.Art ProductionProviding opportunities to develop skills andtechniques for creative visual expressions ofemotions and ideas.Art HistoryProviding opportunities to develop an understanding of the visual arts as a basic component of personal heritage.Art CriticismProviding an opportunity to develop anintellectual basis for analyzing and makingaesthetic judgments based on an understanding of visual ideas and experiences.ELEMENTS OF ART Line: A continuous mark Shape: Area enclosed by a line Color: Hue, reflection of light. Texture: Surface quality, real or implied Form: 3D shape or illusion of 3D Value: Graduated areas of light/dark Space: Illusion of depthPRINCIPLES OF DESIGN Repetition: Imagery repeating pattern Variety: Contrast/variation Rhythm: Issues of eye movement Balance: Even visual weight Emphasis/Economy: Dominance/minimalism Proportion: Compare size relationshipsCOMPOSITION Symmetrical: Mirrored imagery Asymmetrical: Random placement Radial: Mirror image from center point Repetition: Repeating pattern, motifARTISTIC STYLES Realism: Realistic representation Abstraction: Personal interpretation Non-Objective: No recognizable depictionELEMENTS OF DESIGN IN PICTUREBOOKSChildren’s literature that relate to this lessondue to elements of art or story content are: Caillebotte and His Garden at Yerres byPierre Wittmer Gustave Caillebotte: Parisian Impressionistwith a Passion for Water by Gustave Caillbotte Gustave Caillebotte: The Unknown Impressionist by Anne DistelREFERENCE/BIBLIOGRAPHY Broude, Norma (editor). Gustave Caillebotteand the Fashioning of Idenity in Impressionistic Paris. Rutgers University Press. 2002 Varnedoe, Kirk, Gustave Caillebotte. YaleUniversity Press. 2000.Caillebotte died in 1894 at the age of fortyfive. Some accounts say the cause of death wasa stroke and others suggest pulmonary congestion. Caillebotte’s funeral was held in thechurch of Notre-Dame-de-Lorette where hishalf-brother, Alfred, was the vicar. The size ofthe crowd left some standing outside thechurch. He was buried in Paris at PéreLachaise Cemetery. Caillebotte never married,though he had a long relationship with Charlotte Berthier. His will dictated a generousmonthly payment for the remainder of her life.Renoir, executor of Caillebotte’s will, informed the French government of the bequestof sixty works to the Louvre in Paris and themuseum in Luxemburg. The works were accepted but would not be exhibited because theImpressionists’ works were considered undesirable. Renoir found this unacceptable and,after many attempts including extensive presscoverage, an agreement was eventually secured. The majority of those works were exhibited, marking the first time Impressionistpaintings were presented to the public inFrench museums.2.3.4.5.6.About the ArtParis Street; Rainy Day was painted oil oncanvas by Gustave Caillebotte in 1877 and is83.5 x 109 inches. It was hung in the Art Institute of Chicago and wasconsidered a modernhistory painting whenrendered. Caillebottecompleted considerablepreparatory work, firstsketching, then modifying the sketches while experimenting with thecomposition before the painting was startedassuring the design was well-planned and thearchitectural perspective was correct. Finally,the work was painted with the utmost precision. This approach differed a bit from the Impressionist approach that approached paintingmore casually with looser composition andbrushstrokes.narrow Paris streets and built expansiveroads in the heart of the city. They areappreciated today but, when they werefirst built, Parisians, who were used to thecrowed and intimate streets where peoplesocialized, felt these new expansive roadsmade people feel apart from one another,empty and void of social interaction. Describe the many ways Caillebotte conveysemptiness or loneliness in Paris Street:Rainy Day. (Grey colors, lack of conversation, lack of greenery/nature, hard surfaces, isolation under umbrella, the rigid vertical lamp post, and large area of cobblestone.)Discuss how the left side is balanced bythe right side. How is this done?Discuss how one paints surfaces to lookwet. Compare and contrast the two wetsurfaces: cobblestone and sidewalk.If you were to convey “emptiness” orloneliness in art, how would you do it?Look at additional paintings of Caillebotteand discuss his theme of transitioning intoa modern world.Discuss Caillebotte as a patron of the Impressionists and how his actions impactedthe works of art we see in museums today.Consider the world of art if he had notbeen such a generous patron. Everyone hasopportunities to be a patron of the arts.How so?Things to Do1.Directed ObservationShow students an image of Paris Street: RainyDay and tell them it was painted in oil byGustave Caillebotte in 1877. Invite students toquietly study the work. After some time forthinking, encourage students to share what they2.see. Welcome all comments. The followingquestions are provided to help students use artvocabulary to talk about the work.1. Caillebotte painted this Paris scene afterthe Franco-Prussian war ended and a new,restored Paris was forming. The new rulersought to prepare Paris for the future andin doing so, he eliminated many of thePeople react to changes in different ways.Think of a time you had to deal withchange and share how you initially feltabout the change. Consider two- or threedimensional art forms and create a work ofart that conveys theemotional reactionyou had to thechange in your life.Like Caillebotte,create a large scalework so the emotional content is “in your face” and theviewer feels physically present in thework. Create sketches of your ideas. Oncethe image is determined, sketch variationsof the imagery to work out the best composition and features. If rendering a twodimensional work, use poster board orbulletin board paper.Many of Caillebotte’s works, such as Viewof Rooftops (1878), Boulevard Haussman,Snow (1879/81), or Young Man at HisWindow (1875), share a “bird’s eye view“ from a balcony with the city below. Finda similar type of location near you—froma hilltop, building or parking garage anddraw or paint the scene below.

7th Grade: NOVEMBERStill Life with LobsterAnne Vallayer-Coster 2013 Debra J. Herman, M.F.A., All Rights ReservedFunded by the John and Frances Beck Foundation, Chicago, IllinoisEdited by Constance Kammrath, M.A.About the ArtistThe following information is provided to give classroom teachersa comprehensive understanding of the artist and artwork. Useyour judgment on what to share with your students based on theirlevel of curiosity, observation/inquiry skills, comprehension andage-appropriateness.Anne Vallayer-CosterAnne Vallayer was born, the second of four daughters, on December 21, 1744, in Paris, France, near the Seine River. Hermother was a painter of miniatures and her father, Joseph Vallayer, was a goldsmith at the local Gobelins Manufactory Companyknown for the production of the finest tapestries made in Europe.About a century before, Gobelins had been taken over by theFrench Crown, adding painters, metal-workers, furniture-makers,among others, who produced objects for royal palaces and royalgifts. The young Vallayer was privileged to grow up in an artistichousehold and to live in the Gobelin complex where communitymembers were equally skilled in their crafts.and to closely examine the objects in the still life for their reflective and textural qualities. The final version of the still life wasexecuted oil on canvas.The Age of Enlightenment was well underway in 18th centuryFrance. This cultural period was marked by an enormous effort toadvance intellectual knowledge of the world and challenge theestablished order of religion and politics. The Age of Enlightenment had some influence as Vallayer’s still lifes included artifacts from the sea and land, as well as scientific instruments.With the encouragement of teachers and other established artists,Vallayer, at the age of twenty-six, applied for provisional membership in the Royal Academy with her presentation of severalstill life paintings. She was accepted unanimously into provisional and full membership, a dual membership usual for womenartists of the time. However, Vallayer was the only woman accepted into full membership during the French Revolution without the status of being a wife or daughter of an academician orany endorsement from the royal family. As a female member ofthe Royal Academy, Vallayer was not permitted to participate inWhen Vallayer was ten, her father moved the family to anotherany drawing courses at the academy, since these involved nudesection of Paris where he bought, sold and traded jewelry. Thedrawings which was considered indecent for her. While it mayRoyal family granted Joseph the privilege of producing militarynot seem problematic it prevented Vallayer from any future admetals on their behalf. Unfortunately, he soon passed away butvancement. The inability to become an advanced figure drawer/his wife, who assisted her husband in his business, was grantedpermission by the Royals to continue the business with the Val- painter prevented her from participating in the most popular genre of work: historical paintings. she focused on a “lower” genrelayer daughters.including portraiture, landscapes, and still lifes, Without propertraining, Vallayer could not advance to become a professor of artAnne Vallayer showed interest in art early on and studied informally with Madeleine Basseporte, a botanical specialist who also at the Academy. What Academy membership did provide forinstructed the daughters of King Louis XV. Basseporte received Vallayer was access to the biennial Salon where she exhibited herregular payment from the royal treasury to paint plants, birds and art. It was in these exhibits that artists were able to connect withother small animals found near the royal châteaux. Later, Joseph buyers. Prior to academy membership, no artist, male or female,Vernat , a well known landscape and marine painter, gave lessons was permitted to exhibit work unless associated with a discreditto the young Valleyer. Under the tutelage of both Basseporte and ed guild, the same scenario as the Impressionists decades later.Vernat, Vallayer grew as an artist. Her completed still life paintVallayer was a woman who worked in a man’s world, requiring aings produced prior to 1770 exhibited a great sensitivity to perspective, shown by books and boxes placed on angles as well as great deal of courage, talent and hard work. She received constantdepth perception in placement of objects in the foreground, mid- praise for the exceptional level of work she produced but she wasground and background. In addition, she captured amazing details also known for her beauty, modesty and personable disposition.Some have said she was a beautiful woman who painted skillfullyin embroidered tablecloths and drapes, captured the reflectiveas a man. As a female painter, limited to the inferior genre of stillquality of silver, glass and other smooth surfaces, and distinguished the various surfaces of textured items in still life arrange- lifes, she rose to the occasion and painted within her genre withments. Domestic items such as bottles, candlesticks, jugs, bowls, exceptional ability. She eventually moved into the genre of portraiture which received mixed reviews from critics. In the end,food items such as fruits, vegetables and even dead animals(seafood, rabbits) and musical instruments were common objects her reputation as a still life painter was based solely on her artistic skills made evident by the quality of her clientele includingin her still lifes. She usually began her process with preliminarysketches followed by paintings using gouache, a watercolor. This many noteworthy collectors of the time such as financiers, aristoallowed her to see how the composition worked visually on paper crats and the Royal family. Queen Marie-Antoinette, wife of

D

7th Grade: SEPTEMBER Chalk Cliffs on Rügen Casper David Friedrich . depicts the view of the Baltic Sea from the famous lookout points from the chalk cliffs. . Second Edition 1. Friedrich was a very disciplined artist who worked with imagery placed in the

Related Documents:

shapes with different chalk colors. Chalk it UP idea #4 Draw with chalk and nature Chalk it UP idea #5 Chalk it UP idea #6 Chalk mandalas Mandala, which means “circle” is a geometric design that is organized around a central point, to which layers are added to create a radial design. Draw a roadway and town, get out your old toy cars! 4

Color Retention @ 45 , South Florida ASTM D2244: 10 years, Max 5 fade 10 years, Max 5 fade 5 years, Max 5 fade 5 years, Max 5 fade 10 years, Max 5 fade Chalk Resistance @ 45 , South Florida ASTM D4214 10 years, 8 chalk 10 years, 8 chalk 5 years, 8 chalk 5 years, 8 chalk N/A: Film Thick

between 20 and 90 km long in the UK. They are mostly found in south and east England - from Dorset to Humberside. Chalk geology is rare worldwide. The Sussex chalk rivers and streams are therefore of global importance. Chalk rivers All chalk rivers are fed from natural underground aquifers meaning they have clean, clear

Pre-K q Kindergarten q Grades 1–3 Chalk One Up! Literacy Skills / Writing 1. Black paper 2. Sidewalk Chalk 3. Glue 4. Rough-grit sandpaper 5. Scissors 6. Cardstock 1. Read Arthur series book, Binky Rules. In the book, Binky’s name mysteriously appears in chalk all over the school. Students will make chalk name rubs similar to those in the .

amazing outdoor pieces of art with your students, please contemplate potential math and writing inspiration . Chalk Bill Thomson Go to the dollar store and pick up a big bucket of chalk. Take your class outside. Try out some 3D art using inspiration from the book or Google 3D chalk art you’ll be amazed! There’s a book called 3D Chalk too.

Gen 3, 6.5 kV Gen 3, 900 V Gen 2, C2M Family 1.2 kV Gen 1, 1.2 kV Gen 3, 1.2 kV Scaling of State-of-Art Gen-3 SiC Power MOSFETs in R&D RCh/RON becomes larger for lower-V MOSFETs. For Gen-3 1200V MOSFET, RCh 40% of total RON. Future Prospective Reduce RCh/RON by: o Improving MOS INV o Higher packing density

gen-26 davar nanabhoy s practical book keeping & accountancy 12 07/07/1966 gen-27 ghatalia s v practical auditing 15 07/07/1966 gen-28 gupta rup ram advanced accounting 22.5 07/07/1966 gen-29 gupta rup ram auditing 12.5 07/07/1966 gen-30 gupta rup ram text book of auditing 7.5 07/07/1966 gen-31 gupta rup ram cost accounting 9 07/0

Tulang hyoid (1) bersama dengan cartilages menyusun rangka dari larinx. Hyoid terletak pada dasar lidah dan melekat pada dasar tl tengkorak (skull) dengan bantuan ligaments. Source: Wesley Norman, PhD, DSc (1999 ), Homepage for the Anatomy Lesson.html . THE STERNUM STERNUM (1) : berbentuk palang terletak di tengah dada. Bersama dgn tulang rusuk (rib) menyusun rongga Thorax. The sternum .