Introduction To Game Theory Lecture 7: Bayesian Games

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Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleIntroduction to Game TheoryLecture 7: Bayesian GamesHaifeng HuangUniversity of California, MercedShanghai, Summer 2011Application: Juries

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesGames of Incomplete Information: Bayesian Games In the games we have studies so far (both simultaneous-moveand extensive form games), each player knows the otherplayers’ preferences, or payoff functions. Games of completeinformation. Now we study games of incomplete information (Bayesiangames), in which at least some players are not completelyinformed of some other players’ preferences, or some othercharacteristics of the other players that are relevant to theirdecision making.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesExample 1: variant of BoS with one-sided incomplete information Player 2 knows if she wishes to meet player 1, but player 1 isnot sure if player 2 wishes to meet her. Player 1 thinks eachcase has a 1/2 probability. We say player 2 has two types, or there are two states of theworld (in one state player 2 wishes to meet 1, in the otherstate player 2 does not).

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesExample 1: solution This is a Bayesian simultaneous-move game, so we look forthe Bayesian Nash equilibria. In the Bayesian NE:? the action of player 1 is optimal, given the actions of the twotypes of player 2 and player 1’s belief about the state of theworld;? the action of each type of player 2 is optimal, given the actionof player 1. The unique pure-strategy equilibrium is [B, (B, S)], in whichthe first component is player 1’s action, and the secondcomponent (in parenthesis) is the pair of actions of the twotypes of player 2.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesExample 2: variant of BoS with two-sided incomplete information Now neither player is sure if the other player wishes to meet. Player 1’s types: y1 and n1 ; player 2’s types: y2 and n2 .

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesExample 2: [(B,B), (B,S)] as NE [(B, B), (B, S)] is a pure-strategy NE of the game. If player 1 always plays B, certainly player 2 will play B if hertype is y2 and play S if n2 . So player 2’s (B, S) is indeed bestresponse to player 1’s (B, B).

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesExample 2: [(B,B), (B,S)] as NE (cont.) Player 1’s (B, B) is also best response to player 2’s (B, S).? For type y1 ,u1 (B (B, S)) 21 · 2 12 · 0 u1 (S (B, S)) 12 · 0 21 · 1;? For type n1 ,u1 (B (B, S)) 21 · 0 12 · 2 u1 (S (B, S)) 12 · 1 21 · 0.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleExample 2: [(B,B), (B,S)] as NE (cont.) Therefore [(B, B), (B, S)] is a pure-strategy NE. Is [(S, B), (S, S)] a pure-strategy NE of the game?Application: Juries

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesExample 2: [(S,B), (S,S)] as NE If player 2 always plays S, player 1’s best response is indeed Sif her type is y1 and B if n1 . So player 1’s (S, B) is bestresponse to player 2’s (S, S).

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesExample 2: NE [(S,B), (S,S)] (cont.) Player 2’s (S, S) is also best response to player 1’s (S, B).? For type y2 ,u2 (S (S, B)) 23 · 2 13 · 0 u2 (B (S, B)) 23 · 0 31 · 1;? For type n2 ,u2 (S (S, B)) 32 · 0 13 · 2 u2 (B (S, B)) 23 · 1 31 · 0.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesSummary A state is a complete description of one collection of theplayers’ relevant characteristics, including their preferencesand their information. The type of a player embodies any private information that isrelevant to the player’s decision making, including a player’payoff function, her beliefs about other player’s pay-offfunctions, her beliefs about other players’ beliefs about herbeliefs, and so on. In a Bayesian game, each type of each player chooses anaction. In NE, the action chosen by each type of each player isoptimal, given the actions chosen by every type of every otherplayer.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesMore information may hurt (1) In single-person decision problems, a person cannot be worseoff with more information. In strategic interactions, a playermay be worse off if she has more information and otherplayers know that she has more information. In the following game, each player believes that both statesare equally likely. 0 1/2. What is the NE?

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesMore information may hurt (2) Player 2’s unique best response to each action of player 1 is L.Player 1’s unique best response to L is B. So the unique NEis (B, L), with each player getting a payoff of 2. What if player 2 knows the state for sure?

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesMore information may hurt (3) Player 2 has a dominant strategy of R in state ω1 , and adominant strategy of M in state ω2 . When player 2 is onlygoing to play R or M, player 1 has a dominant strategy of T .So the unique NE is now [T , (R, M)]. Regardless of the state, player 2’s payoff is now 3 2, since 1/2.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesUncertainty about players’ knowledge: information contagion (1) Bayesian games can not only model uncertainty about players’preferences, but also uncertainty about each other’sknowledge. In the following, player 1 can distinguish state α from otherstates, but cannot distinguish state β from state γ; player 2can distinguish state γ from other state, but cannotdistinguish state α from state β.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesInformation contagion (2) Note that player 2’s preferences are the same in all threestates, and player 1’s preferences are the same in states β andγ. Therefore, in state γ, each player knows the other player’spreferences, and player 2 knows that player 1 knows herprefernces. But player 1 does not know that player 2 knowsher preferences (player 1 thinks it might be state β, in whichcase player 2 does not know if it is state β or α).

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesInformation contagion (3) If both players are completely informed in state γ, both (L, L)and (R, R) are NE. But this whole Bayesian game has a unique NE. What is it? First consider player 1’s choice in state α. (R is dominant.)? Next consider player 2’s choice when she knows the state iseither α or β. (R is better than L given 1’s choice in α.)? Then consider player 1’s choice when she knows the state iseither β or γ. (R is better, given 1 and 2’s actions in α and β.)? Finally consider player 2’s choice in state γ. (R is better.)

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesInformation contagion (4) Information contagion leads to the unique NE: (R, R). Consider the following extension: In state δ, player 2 knows player 1’s prefernces, but player 2does not know if player 1 knows that player 2 knows player 1’spreferences (player 2 does not know if the state is γ or δ; if γ,player 1 knows it can be β; if β, player 2 would think it mightbe α, in which case player 1’s preferences are different.) (R, R), however, is still the unique NE.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: Juries“They don’t know that we know they know we know.” The Rubinstein email game. The eye colors puzzle. Friends: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v Fpl4D3 b6DU

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesSome basic facts about probability Let E and F be two events, each occuring respectively withprobability Pr (E ) and Pr (F ). We have the following facts. The probability that event E occurs, given that F hasoccurred, is Pr (E F ) PrPr(E(F,F) ) , where Pr (· ·) indicates theconditional probability, and Pr (E , F ) is the probability thatboth events occur. In other words,Pr (E , F ) Pr (F )Pr (E F ) Pr (F , E ) Pr (E )Pr (F E ). Further, denote the event that E does not occur as E c (cmeans complement), then Pr (F ) Pr (E , F ) Pr (E c , F ) Pr (E )Pr (F E ) Pr (E c )Pr (F E c ).Pr (E )Pr (F E ) Then, Pr (E F ) Pr (E )Pr (F E ) Pr (E c )Pr (F E c )

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesBayes’ rule More generally, let E1 , E2 , ., En be a collection of exclusiveevents (meaning exactly one of these events must occur). Then the probability of a particular event Ek conditional onevent F isPr (F Ek )Pr (Ek )Pr (Ek F ) Pn.j 1 Pr (F Ej )Pr (Ej ) This is an extremely important formula, called Bayes’ rule,which enables us to calculate the posterior probability aboutan event based on the prior probability and newinformation/evidence. Prior belief: a player’s initial belief about the probability ofan event (i.e., Pr (Ek )). Posterior belief: a player’s updated belief after receiving newinformation/evidence (i.e., Pr (Ek F )).

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesA model of juries: setup (1) A number of jurors need to decide to convict or acquit adefendant. A unanimous verdict is required for conviction. Each juror comes to the trial with a prior belief that thedefendant is guilty with probability π. Then they receive apiece of information. But each may interpret the informationdifferently. If a juror interprets the information as evidence of guilt, wesay she receives a signal g (or, the juror’s type is g ); if a jurorinterprets the information as evidence of innocence, we sayshe receives a signal c (or, the juror’s type is c, c stands forclean). Denote the event that the defendant is actually guility as G ;denote the event that the defendant is actually innocent(clean) as C .

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesA model of juries: setup (2) When G occurs (the defendant is actually guilty), theprobability that a given juror receives the signal g is p,p 1/2; in other words, Pr (g G ) p 1/2. When C occurs, the probability that a given juror receives thesingal c is q, q 1/2; in other words, Pr (c C ) q 1/2. Each juror’s payoffs: 0, if guilty defendant convicted orinnocent defendant acquitted; z,ifinnocent defendant convicted; (1 z), if guilty defendant acquitted.(1) z is cost of convicting an innocent defendant (type I error),and 1 z is the cost of acquiting a guilty defendant (type IIerror).

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesOne juror First consider the case in which there is only one juror. Suppose the juror receives the signal c (she interprets theinformation as evidence of innocence), the probability shethinks the defendant is actually guility isPr (c G )Pr (G )Pr (c G )Pr (G ) Pr (c C )Pr (C )(1 p)π. (1 p)π q(1 π)P(G c) By (?), the juror will acquit the defendant if(1 z)P(G c) z(1 P(G c)), orz P(G c) (1 p)π.(1 p)π q(1 π)

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesOne juror (cont.) Suppose the juror receives the signal g , a similar calculationyields that she will convict the defendant ifz pπ.pπ (1 q)(1 π) Therefore the juror optimally acts according to herinterpretation of the information if(1 p)πpπ z .(1 p)π q(1 π)pπ (1 q)(1 π)

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesTwo jurors Now suppose there are two jurors. Is there an equilibrium in which each juror votes according to her signal?Suppose juror 2 votes according to her signal: vote to acquitif her signal is c and vote to convict if her signal is g .If juror 2’s signal is c, then juror 1’s vote does not matter forthe outcome (unanimity is required for conviction).So juror 1 can ignore the possibility that juror 2’s signal maybe c, and assume it is g .We want to see when juror 1 will vote to acquit when hersignal is c. When juror 1’s signal is c and juror 2’s signal is g ,juror 1 thinks the probability that the defendant is guilty isPr (c, g G )Pr (G )Pr (c, g G )Pr (G ) Pr (c, g C )Pr (C )(1 p)pπ .(1 p)pπ q(1 q)(1 π)P(G c, g )

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesTwo jurors (cont.) By (?), juror 1 will vote to acquit the defendant if(1 z)P(G c, g ) z(1 P(G c, g )), orz P(G c) (1 p)pπ.(1 p)pπ q(1 q)(1 π) By a similar calculation, if juror 1 receives a signal g , she willvote to convict ifz p2π.p 2 π (1 q)2 (1 π) Therefore juror 1 optimally votes according to herinterpretation of the information(1 p)pπp2π z 2.(1 p)pπ q(1 q)(1 π)p π (1 q)2 (1 π)

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesOne juror vs. two jurors To recap, when there is only one juror, she acts according toher signal if(1 p)πpπ z .(1 p)π q(1 π)pπ (1 q)(1 π)(2) When there are two jurors, they vote according to their signalsif(1 p)pπp2π z 2.(1 p)pπ q(1 q)(1 π)p π (1 q)2 (1 π)(3) Compare the left sides of (?) and (?), and recall thatp 1/2 1 q. The lowest value of z with which jurors vote according totheir signals is higher in the two-juror case than in theone-juror case. A juror is less worried about convicting aninnocent person when there are two jurors.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesMany jurors (1) Now suppose the number of jurors is n. Is there anequilibrium in which each juror votes according to her signal? Suppose every juror other than juror 1 votes according to hersignal: vote to acquit if her signal is c and vote to convict ifher signal is g . Again juror 1 can ignore the possibility that some other jurors’signals may be c, and assume every other juror’s signal is g . And again we want to see when juror 1 will vote to acquitwhen her signal is c. When juror 1’s signal c and every otherjuror’s signal is g , juror 1 thinks the probability that thedefendant is guilty isPr (c, g , ., g G )Pr (G )Pr (c, g , ., g G )Pr (G ) Pr (c, g , ., g C )Pr (C )(1 p)p n 1 π .(1 p)p n 1 π q(1 q)n 1 (1 π)P(G c, g , ., g )

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesMany jurors (2) By (?), juror 1 will vote for acquital if(1 z)P(G c, g , ., g ) z(1 P(G c, g , ., g )), or(1 p)p n 1 π(1 p)p n 1 π q(1 q)n 1 (1 π)1. n 1q1 q1 π1 1 p()pπz Given that p 1 q, the denominator approaches 1 as nincreases. So the lower bound on z for which juror 1 votes foracquittal when her signal is c approaches 1 as n increases. Inother words, in a large jury, if jurors care even slightly aboutacquitting a guilty defendant (type II error), then a juror whointerprets a piece of information as evidence of innocence willnevertheless vote for conviction.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: JuriesMany jurors: equilibria In other words, in a large jury in which the jurors areconcerned about acquitting a guility defendant, there is noNash equilibrium in which every juror votes according to hersignal. Is there a NE in which every juror votes for acquittal regardlessof her signal (easy), and is there a NE in which every jurorvotes for conviction regardless of her signal (slightly harder)? There is also a mixed strategy NE for some values of z, inwhich a juror votes for conviction if her signal is g , andrandomizes between acquittal and conviction if her signal is c.Interestingly, in this NE the probability an innocent defendantis convicted increases as n increases.

Introduction to Bayesian GamesSurprises About InformationBayes’ RuleApplication: Juries Games of Incomplete Information: Bayesian Games In the games we have studies so far (both simultaneous-move and extensive form games), each player knows the other players’ preferences, or payo functions. Games of complete information.

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