IOGP Life-Saving Rules - HSE Life NL

1y ago
39 Views
2 Downloads
1.42 MB
22 Pages
Last View : 5d ago
Last Download : 1m ago
Upload by : Rafael Ruffin
Transcription

REPORT459IOGP Life-Saving RulesleadtogetherAUGUST2018

AcknowledgementsThis report was authored by the Life-Saving Rules Task Force of theIOGP Safety Committee.Photography used with permission courtesy of Dutchy/iStockphoto and Maersk Oil - Photographer Morten Larsen (Front cover) botulinum21/iStock (Back cover)FeedbackIOGP welcomes feedback on our reports: publications@iogp.orgDisclaimerWhilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the informationcontained in this publication, neither IOGP nor any of its Members past present orfuture warrants its accuracy or will, regardless of its or their negligence, assumeliability for any foreseeable or unforeseeable use made thereof, which liability ishereby excluded. Consequently, such use is at the recipient’s own risk on the basisthat any use by the recipient constitutes agreement to the terms of this disclaimer.The recipient is obliged to inform any subsequent recipient of such terms.This publication is made available for information purposes and solely for the privateuse of the user. IOGP will not directly or indirectly endorse, approve or accredit thecontent of any course, event or otherwise where this publication will be reproduced.Copyright noticeThe contents of these pages are International Association of Oil & Gas Producers.Permission is given to reproduce this report in whole or in part provided (i) thatthe copyright of IOGP and (ii) the sources are acknowledged. All other rights arereserved. Any other use requires the prior written permission of IOGP.These Terms and Conditions shall be governed by and construed in accordancewith the laws of England and Wales. Disputes arising here from shall be exclusivelysubject to the jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.

REPORT459IOGP Life-Saving RulesRevision historyVERSIONDATEAMENDMENTS3.0August 2018Major revision2.0April 2013Amendments to safety icon designs1.0February 2012First issuedAUGUST2018

IOGP Life-Saving RulesContents1. Foreword62. The Life-Saving Rules83. Implementing the Life-Saving Rules93.1 Fundamental requirements93.2 Lessons learned in rules implementation103.3 The Life-Saving Rules as part of a system123.4 Life-Saving Rules implementation resources194. Data analysis in the revision of the Life-Saving Rules204

IOGP Life-Saving RulesScopeWith the revision of Report 459, IOGP launches a simplified set of Life-SavingRules to provide workers in the industry with the actions they can take to protectthemselves and their colleagues from fatalities. IOGP aims to improve the level ofindustry-wide adoption across the global oil and gas industry. The reduced numberof rules (nine) still cover a similar scope to that of the original 18 Life-SavingRules: since 2008, 376 lives could have been potentially saved by following therevised IOGP Life-Saving Rules.IOGP Report 459 introduces the revised IOGP Life-Saving Rules, providesimplementation guidance and the background data analysis. Additionalimplementation materials are available from https://www.iogp.org/life-savingrules.5

IOGP Life-Saving Rules1. ForewordIOGP Member companies recognise the value of providing clear, simple, andconsistent information regarding risks in the workplace and the proper use ofbarriers and safeguards to protect the workforce. In 2010 IOGP published a set ofLife-Saving Rules to mitigate risk and reduce fatalities in the oil and gas industry.These were derived from analysis data reported to IOGP: 1484 fatal incidents(1991-2010) and 1173 high potential events (2000-2010). Following these simplerules could have prevented around 70% of these fatalities.While member companies and others benefit from implementing theirown programmes, there is greater clarity and effectiveness to be gained instandardising Life-Saving Rules across the industry. Over 80% of the workforce,and around 80% of fatalities, are contractor employees (Fig 1). Contractors arerequired to learn numerous process requirements for each client, even though theoperating practices, activities, and risks are fundamentally the 0000Fatalitiesworkhours 0162017Hours company thousandsHours contractor thousandsTotal company fatalitiesTotal contractor fatalities0Figure 1: Fatalities reported to IOGP (2008-2017), and associated workhoursIn 2018, IOGP re-examined the applicability of the 2010 Rules against the mostrecent fatality data. With the revision of this report, IOGP launches a simplified setof Life-Saving Rules (Figure 2) to provide workers in the industry with the actionsthey can take to protect themselves and their colleagues from fatalities. With areduced number of rules (nine reduced from 18), but still covering a similar scope,IOGP aims to improve the level of industry-wide adoption across the global oil and6

IOGP Life-Saving Rulesgas industry. Since 2008, 376 lives could have been potentially saved by followingthe revised IOGP Life-Saving Rules (See Appendix A for data analysis, Ruledevelopment, and applicability).The IOGP Life-Saving Rules are not intended to address all risks and hazards inthe oil and gas industry; they are meant to draw attention to the activities mostlikely to lead to a fatality, and the life-saving actions over which an individualhas control. The Rules are intended to support existing company managementsystems. They are not intended to replace company management systems,policies, safety training programmes, operating procedures, or work instructions,and in fact rely on this framework being in place.Standardisation of Life-Saving Rules across the oil and gas industry: Enables better transfer of knowledge, experience and lessons learned Increases individual awareness ownership of critical safeguards that preventfatalities Is a step towards an industry-wide common safety language Improves clarity and allows consistent use by contractors and operatorsdoing similar work across the worldTo achieve the benefits of standardisation and prevent workforce fatalities,all 9 Rules should be adopted as written and not be modified or substituted;organisations should: Adopt the IOGP Life-Saving Rules if they currently have no equivalentprogram Transition to the revised IOGP Life-Saving Rules if using a different set ofrules or if using the previous set of IOGP rules Encourage joint ventures and partners to implement the revised IOGP LifeSaving Rules Accept and encourage contractor use of the revised IOGP Life-Saving RulesThis document provides an introduction to the revised Rules, data analysis, andimplementation guidance. Additional implementation resources are available fromthe IOGP website.7

IOGP Life-Saving Rules2. The Life-Saving RulesThe nine Life-Saving Rules are shown in Figure 2. These Rules focus on theactivities which, through rigorous data analysis, have been shown to most likelyresult in fatalities. Each Rule consists of an icon and simple life-saving actionsindividuals can take to prevent a work related fatality.Bypassing Safety ControlsConfined SpaceDrivingObtain authorisationbefore overridingor disabling safetycontrolsObtain authorisationbefore entering aconfined spaceFollow safe drivingrules I always wear aseatbelt I do not exceed the speed limit,and reduce my speed for roadconditions I do not use phones or operatedevices while driving I am fit, rested and fully alert whiledriving I follow journey management I understand and use safetycritical equipment and procedureswhich apply to my task I obtain authorisation before:– disabling or overriding safetyequipment– deviating from procedures– crossing a barrier I confirm energysources are isolated I confirm the atmosphere has beentested and is monitored I check and use my breathingapparatus when required I confirm there is an attendantstanding by I confirm a rescue plan is in place I obtain authorisation to enterEnergy IsolationHot WorkLine of FireVerify isolation andzero energy beforework beginsControl flammablesand ignition sourcesKeep yourself andothers out of theline of fire0 I have identified allenergy sources I confirm that hazardous energysources have been isolated,locked, and tagged I have checked there is zeroenergy and tested for residualor stored energy I identify and controlignition sources Before starting any hot work:– I confirm flammable materialhas been removed or isolated– I obtain authorisation Before starting hot work in ahazardous area I confirm:– a gas test has been completed– gas will be monitored continuallySafe Mechanical LiftingWork AuthorisationWorking at HeightPlan liftingoperations andcontrol the areaWork with a validpermit whenrequiredProtect yourselfagainst a fall whenworking at height I confirm that theequipment and loadhave been inspected andare fit for purpose I only operate equipment that I amqualified to use I establish and obey barriers andexclusion zones I never walk under a suspendedload I have confirmed ifa permit is required I am authorised to performthe work I understand the permit I have confirmed that hazards arecontrolled and it is safe to start I stop and reassess if conditionschange I inspect my fallprotection equipmentbefore use I secure tools and work materialsto prevent dropped objects I tie off 100% to approved anchorpoints while outside a protectedareaFigure 2: The 9 IOGP Life-Saving Rules8 I position myself toavoid:– moving objects– vehicles– pressure releases– dropped objects I establish and obey barriers andexclusion zones I take action to secure loose objectsand report potential dropped objects

IOGP Life-Saving Rules3. Implementing the Life-SavingRulesStandardisation of Life-Saving Rules simplifies training, aids compliance andunderstanding of critical safeguards, and helps transfer of experience and lessonslearned. Effective industry wide implementation requires collaboration betweenoperators, contractors, and subcontractors.To achieve the benefits of standardisation, all 9 Rules should be adopted as writtenand not be modified or substituted.It is accepted that operational risk profiles may differ, and the Rules may notaddress all an organisation’s fatality risks. In this case, companies are encouragedto manage these other risks through existing management systems or in otherways, e.g., campaigns, training, and workforce engagement, rather than creatingadditional Life-Saving Rules.It is important that the Rules are understood by all individuals, their supervisors,and their leaders, and that management have created the conditions necessary toenable everyone to follow the Rules.3.1Fundamental requirementsSuccessful implementation of the Rules requires the following, as a minimum: Organisations have an existing safety management system, containing thefollowing supporting policies, processes and systems:–– Worker Fitness for Duty including a drug and alcohol policy–– Contractor (and subcontractor) Management program includingbridging arrangements, if applicable–– Journey Management program–– Safe systems of work including permit to work, and energy isolation–– Management of change–– Hazard identification and awareness, risk assessment and safeguardmanagement–– Field (self) verification providing checking and verification of critical tasks A commitment that work does not start until all individuals involved areaware of and can confirm they can follow the Life-Saving Rules that arerelevant to that work. A requirement that work is not conducted without a pre-job risk assessmentand a safety discussion, such as a toolbox talk, appropriate for the level of risk. Organisations define which procedures and equipment are safety critical andensure impacted workers clearly understand what these are. Personnel are trained and competent for the work they conduct. Equipment is fit for purpose, properly maintained, and in working condition.9

IOGP Life-Saving Rules Before work starts, there are emergency response plans in place that have beendeveloped from a review of potential emergency scenarios, which have suitableand sufficient resources available, and which are periodically drilled/tested. Everyone is authorised to intervene or stop work without adverseconsequences if they are in any doubt about the safety of an activity. Suitable personal protective equipment is provided and worn in accordancewith the requirements identified by the risk assessment and worksite policies.3.2Lessons learned in rules implementationSenior Management commitment is essential to successfully roll-out the LifeSaving Rules. The following steps for effective implementation are based on theexperience of IOGP member companies that have successfully implemented LifeSaving Rules equivalent programmes: Conduct a risk assessment of your organisation’s activities and reviewhistorical data related to fatalities and high potential events within your ownorganisation (both company employee and contractors) and determine howthese align with the Life-Saving Rules. Develop a business case/change management programme and discuss withleadership of both your organisation and your contractors and subcontractorsto ensure commitment to implement the Life-Saving Rules. Ensure implementation, use and compliance are owned by line-management(e.g. maintenance, facilities, operations, etc.) and supported by HSEprofessionals. Develop a communications and roll-out plan for the implementation of theLife-Saving Rules (stakeholder mapping, communications plan, accountabilityand compliance strategy in consultation with legal, supply chain and humanresources departments). Develop performance monitoring methods to determine the effectiveimplementation and ongoing use of the Life-Saving Rules. Use the IOGP Life-Saving Rules roll-out and engagement materials.Helping people follow the RulesExperience from member companies shows that the Life-Saving Rules, whenconsistently applied, prevent fatalities. Simply communicating the Rules and then holdingpeople accountable for following them is not enough for effective implementation.To enable individuals to follow the Life-Saving Rules, organisations need first toprovide the right conditions:10

IOGP Life-Saving Rules Everyone needs to know the Rules, understand their value, and whatfollowing the Rules means for their role. The physical workplace conditions required to be able to follow the Rulesneed to present (e.g., certified anchor points provided for all work at height,vehicles equipped with seatbelts) There need to be clear expectations set and supported from the top of theorganisation that work must not start unless the Rules can be followed, andthese must be visible to the workforce, by, for example, ensuring physicalworkplace conditions are present. Everyone must be given the authority and be encouraged to stop work andintervene if they observe a Life-Saving Rule (or indeed any other unsafeactivity) actually, or potentially, not being followed. Proactive intervention maybe the last opportunity to prevent injury or fatality.The focus on personal accountability for following the Rules is about care andconcern for the individual and the well-being of everyone who works in our industry.If a Life-Saving Rule is not followed, organisations need to determine the reasonto learn and improve workplace conditions, whether it resulted in undesirableconsequences or not. Organisations have a role in positively reinforcing an openreporting culture, i.e. for self-reported errors and peer-to-peer interventions andresponding appropriately where cases of ‘non-reporting’ are found. The intent is tounderstand what conditions and environment meant that a Rule was not followed, anddrove people to do what they did, so that lessons can be identified, applied and learned.If a Life-Saving Rule is not followed, despite organisations providing all the necessaryenabling conditions, then consequence management may have a place. This mightbe relevant for the individual, or for those responsible for providing the enablingconditions. However, companies should also consider that such occasions are rareand should always follow their internal processes for dealing with such matters.An IOGP Member recently looked at 353 of their incidents that had been taggedas a potential human violation (not necessarily related to a Life-Saving Rule).Of these, system-level issues were identified as causal in 90% of cases; theseissues include unclear procedures (23%), capability and resources (30%) andmistakes due to labelling, alarms or tool issues (21%). That means that only avery small proportion of all incidents were actual violations1. This experiencematches that of other IOGP Members, and that of other industrial sectors (inthe construction industry, for example, human violations account for only 5%of incidents2). IOGP strongly encourages all organisations considering applying12F.K. Bitar et al. ‘From individual behaviour to system weaknesses: The re-design of the Just Culture process in aninternational energy company. A case study’. Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries 55, 2018, pp. 267-282.United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive. Causal Factors in construction accidents. HSE Books, Norwich, 2003.11

IOGP Life-Saving Rulesconsequence management for not following a Life-Saving Rule to be sure that theperson deliberately intended not to follow a Rule despite being given all enablingconditions and the leadership and supervisory support to do so.Continued engagement and integrationThe introduction of the Life-Saving Rules to a workforce is not by itself sufficientto produce the tangible benefits of standardisation. An ongoing effort is required todrive integration and conformance with a dynamic global workforce. Organisationsshould use the tools available within their existing management systems tocontinuously improve conformance to the Life-Saving Rules. Examples may include: Awareness campaigns Refresher training Leadership site visits Positive recognition of conformance and interventions Internal and external feedback for improvement of compliance Integration into contractual agreements Use of IOGP engagement resourcesFurther readingPlease refer to the following published technical papers for case studieson implementing the Life-Saving Rules, refreshing the programme, anda comparative study of various companies’ programs and implementationapproaches: SPE-157465-MS: A Major Oil Company’s Approach to Significantly ReduceFatal Incidents SPE-179289-MS: Re-Energising the Life-Saving Rules The APPEA Journal 2017, 57, 41–48: Golden safety rules: are they keeping ussafe?3.3The Life-Saving Rules as part of a systemAs noted in the introduction to this document, the Life-Saving Rules are intendedto support existing company management systems and, in fact, rely on them beingin place. The following table provides some explanatory guidance and relevantindustry references.12

IOGP Life-Saving RulesLife-Saving RuleBypassing Safety ControlsObtain authorisationbefore overridingor disabling safetycontrols I understand and use safetycritical equipment and procedureswhich apply to my task I obtain authorisation before:– disabling or overriding safetyequipment– deviating from procedures– crossing a barrierConfined SpaceObtain authorisationbefore entering aconfined space I confirm energysources are isolated I confirm the atmosphere has beentested and is monitored I check and use my breathingapparatus when required I confirm there is an attendantstanding by I confirm a rescue plan is in place I obtain authorisation to enterAdditional Guidance & ReferencesSafety-critical controls include: Equipment (such as fire and explosion protection andmitigation systems, guards, interlocks, alarms andsafety-critical monitoring equipment) whose purposeis to prevent a fatality or other major accident, limit theconsequences of a major accident, or whose failurecould cause or contribute substantially to a fatality orother major accident. Procedures that if not performed correctly or at theright time could result in a fatality or other majoraccident.A confined space, such as a vessel, tank, pipe, cellar orexcavation, can contain explosive gas, toxic or asphyxiatingatmosphere or other dangers such as energy releases, lackof oxygen, exposure to hazardous chemicals, things that canfall on you or crush you, or that you can fall from. Authorisedaccess keeps you safe.Organisations should determine if any work involvingexcavations or trenches creates confined space conditionsand ensure necessary work authorisation and controls.Further reading: IOGP report 577 – Fabrication site construction safetypractices – Hazardous activities provides simplerequirements for confined space entry. Althoughdeveloped for construction, these are easilytransferable to other operations. UK Health and Safety Executive (UK HSE):http://www.hse.gov.uk/confinedspace/ USA Occupational Safety and Health Administration(OSHA): https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/confinedspaces/ API Recommended Practice for the Design of OffshoreFacilities Against Fire and Blast Loading13

IOGP Life-Saving RulesLife-Saving RuleAdditional Guidance & ReferencesThe driver and passengers should take responsibility foreach other’s safety, including ensuring all occupants arewearing a seatbelt.DrivingFollow safe drivingrules I always wear aseatbelt I do not exceed the speed limit,and reduce my speed for roadconditions I do not use phones or operatedevices while driving I am fit, rested and fully alert whiledriving I follow journey managementFitness for duty means assuring that an individual cancomplete a task safely and without unacceptable risk tothemselves or other. This includes not being under theinfluence of drugs and alcohol.Further reading: IOGP Report 365 - Land transportation safetyrecommended practice describes how to implementland transportation safety elements in a managementsystem - addressing, among other topics, seatbeltrequirements, distracted driving, speeding, fitness andalertness, and journey management. IOGP Report 470 – Fitness to Work provides a structuredprocess for the systematic identification, assessmentand management of the risks associated with tasks thatplace specific demands (physical or psychological) onemployees.Energy IsolationVerify isolation andzero energy beforework begins0 I have identified allenergy sources I confirm that hazardous energysources have been isolated,locked, and tagged I have checked there is zeroenergy and tested for residualor stored energyEnergy isolation separates people from hazards such aselectricity, pressure and energised equipment. Energyisolation also provides protection from potential energysources e.g. positioning valves to prevent tanks filling withmaterials due to gravity.Any stored energy (e.g., hydraulic or pneumatic power)should also be dissipated before the work starts.Further reading: IOGP report 577 – Fabrication site construction safetypractices – Hazardous activities provides simplerequirements for energy isolation. Although developedfor construction, these are easily transferable to otheroperations. OSHA: The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout), Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part1910.147 UK HSE: The safe isolation of plant and equipmentHSG 25314

IOGP Life-Saving RulesLife-Saving RuleHot WorkControl flammablesand ignition sources I identify and controlignition sources Before starting any hot work:– I confirm flammable materialhas been removed or isolated– I obtain authorisation Before starting hot work in ahazardous area I confirm:– a gas test has been completed– gas will be monitored continuallyAdditional Guidance & ReferencesHot work includes any work that creates an ignitionsource performed in an area which potentially containshydrocarbons or flammable materials.Ignition sources are open flames or sources of heat thatcould ignite materials in the work area such as welding,grinding, smoking, torching, (un)loading of hazardousmaterials, internal combustion engines, chemical reactions,batteries, etc.Hazardous areas are defined in the UK DangerousSubstances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002(DSEAR) as “any place in which an explosive atmosphere mayoccur in quantities such as to require special precautions toprotect the safety of workers”.Further reading: Energy Institute: Model code of safe practice Part 15:Area classification for installations handling flammablefluids NFPA 70: National Electrical Code15

IOGP Life-Saving RulesLife-Saving RuleLine of FireKeep yourself andothers out of theline of fire I position myself toavoid:– moving objects– vehicles– pressure releases– dropped objects I establish and obey barriers andexclusion zones I take action to secure loose objectsand report potential dropped objectsAdditional Guidance & ReferencesOther rules focus on specific activities, whereas this Rule isintended to raise personal awareness of struck-by and caughtin-between hazards. Line of fire hazards are not always obviousor constant and can be introduced as the task progresses(e.g. underground and overhead powerlines, pipelines, objectsunder pressure, stored energy, lines under tension, poorlysupported excavations, shifting cargo, moving equipment).At all times individuals need to continually monitor theirsurroundings and position themselves to avoid being in theline of fire. This includes ensuring they are visible to vehicledrivers and equipment operators.Individuals recognise when they create a line of fire hazardand put others or themselves in the line of fire.Further reading: IOGP report 577 – Fabrication site construction safetypractices – Hazardous activities provides simplerequirements on topics that address line of riskhazards, on traffic interfaceDropped objects preventionHousekeepingWorking at heightLiftingAlthough developed for construction, these are easilytransferable to other operations. DROPS Online: http://www.dropsonline.org/ OSHA: 29 CFR 1926 Safety and Health Regulations forConstruction–– Subpart P: Excavations–– Subpart CC: Cranes & Derricks in Construction UK HSE: Structural stability during etytopics/excavations.htm UK HSE: GS6 – Avoiding Dangers from overhead powerlines The National Institute for Occupational Safety andHealth (NIOSH), Construction Equipment workzones/default.html Energy Institute Reflective Learning olkit/reflective-lfi16

IOGP Life-Saving RulesLife-Saving RuleSafe Mechanical LiftingPlan liftingoperations andcontrol the area I confirm that theequipment and loadhave been inspected andare fit for purpose I only operate equipment that I amqualified to use I establish and obey barriers andexclusion zones I never walk under a suspendedloadAdditional Guidance & ReferencesLifting operations need to be planned and performed bycompetent personnel using certified equipment.To protect people around suspended loads and anymechanical lifting operation, access should be controlledthrough physical barriers and exclusion zones.When mechanically lifting people (e.g. manriding, manbaskets, personnel transfer, mobile elevated work platform),organisations should provide equipment which is designedand certified specifically for lifting people.Further reading: IOGP Report 376 – Lifting & hoisting recommendedpractice provides further guidance on essentialprinciples for safe lifting (including personnel),implemented as part of a management system. IOGP Report 577 – Fabrication site construction safetypractices – Hazardous activities provides simplerequirements for lifting. Although developed forconstruction, these are easily transferable to otheroperations.Work AuthorisationWork with a validpermit whenrequired I have confirmed ifa permit is required I am authorised to performthe work I understand the permit I have confirmed that hazards arecontrolled and it is safe to start I stop and reassess if conditionschangeWork authorisation is more than just a person in chargesigning a Permit to Work form: it is seeking and havingauthorisation to start, resume, or hand-over a task.The person in charge of the work confirms that it is safe tostart, that controls are in place and effective, and the taskcan be performed as planned.Further reading: IOGP Report 189 Guidelines on permit to work systems IOGP Report 577 – Fabrication site construction safetypractices – Hazardous activities provides simplerequirements for Job Safety Analysis UK HSE: HSG 250 Guidance on permit-to-worksystems: A guide for the petroleum, chemical and alliedindustries17

IOGP Life-Saving RulesLife-Saving RuleWorking at HeightProtect yourselfagainst a fall whenworking at height I inspect my fallprotection equipmentbefore use I secure tools and work materialsto prevent dropped objects I tie off 100% to approved anchorpoints while outside a protectedareaAdditional Guidance & ReferencesWorking at height outside a protected area (such as anelevated work area not enclosed by hand rails) requires theuse of approved fall protection equipment secured to anapproved anchor point. Other considerations for workingat height include ladders, work over water, rope access,floor openings, access hatches, and inspection pits. Flooropenings should be protected with physical barriers toprevent falls.Preventing objects from falling from height and usingphysical barriers below working area keeps you and peopleworking below you safe.IOGP recommends that companies define working atheight as work at or above 1.8m/6ft, unless local legislationrequires a lower height.Scaffolds should be properly constructed, inspected andcertified.Further reading: IOGP report 577 – Fabrication site construction safetypractices – Hazardous activities provides simplerequirements for working at heig

3.3 The Life-Saving Rules as part of a system 12 3.4 Life-Saving Rules implementation resources 19 4. Data analysis in the revision of the Life-Saving Rules 20 Contents 4 I Life-Saving Rules. Scope With the revision of Report 459, IOGP launches a simpli

Related Documents:

Life Saving Rules which are recognized and enforced by companies. These Life Saving Rules are intended to supplement and/or support existing company management systems, programs and policies. These Life Saving Rules are based upon the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (IOGP) Life Saving Rules to maximize industry alignment.

Grant Elliott, Vice Chair of IOGP’s Climate Change Workshop TF Oliver Jones, Vice Chair of IOGP’s Climate Change Workshop TF . involved in the development of the ocean-surface wave coupling at ECMWF. He oversees the development of the Norwegian wave forecast system and the OpenDrift oil

LSA Code International Life Saving Appliance Code – Resolution MSC.48(66) Chapter I General 1.1 Definitions 1.1 Definitions 1.1.1. Convention means the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended. 1.1.2. Effective clearing of the ship is File Size: 729KBPage Count: 50Explore furtherLife-Saving Appliances inc. LSA Code, 2017 Edition .fontanski.plInternational Life-saving Appliance (LSA) Codeindustrialgraphicsupply.com(PDF) LSA CODE INTERNATIONAL LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCE CODE .www.academia.eduLife-Saving Appliance LSA Code, 2017 Edition IMO Bookswww.amnautical.comLSA-Code International Life-saving appliance Code (MSC.48 .puc.overheid.nlRecommended to you b

Risk Management and HSE Culture in GEP GASSCO HSE Summit 2014 A. Garayhi Haugesund, 23.10.2014 . Job Safety Analysis (specific, individual) HSE Coordination (e.g. coordination plan, meetings) Special Work Permits . Tool 14 % Crane 29 % Equipment, Pipe 14 % Transport Machines (Forklift etc.) 29 % Others

Life Saving Rules Our Life Saving Rules are an important part of our Safety Shield and it is up to everyone in Wood to know them, understand them and above all follow them. 0 Compliance with the Life Saving Rules are a condition of employment within Wood and must be followed at all times. They must also be complied with by Wood’s

HSE Inspections 25 ADNOC Life Saving Rules 26 Incident Analysis 28 Employee Recognition 29 Occupational Health 30 Initiative by Employees 30 ADNOC Marathon 31 Road Safety 31 Waste Management 32 Oil Based Mud Treatment Plant 33 Quality & HSE Management System 34 Management Review Meetings 34 External Audits 34 Internal Audits 34

UBO/MPD Operations – HSE Planning Guidelines Revision 00 Page 1 of 15 December 2012 UNDERBALANCED AND MANAGED PRESSURE DRILLING OPERATIONS - HSE PLANNING GUIDELINES – Revision 0 – Written and Compiled by: HSE Subcommittee Date: December 2012 Issue FINAL

An Introduction to Random Field Theory Matthew Brett , Will Penny †and Stefan Kiebel MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge UK; † Functional Imaging Laboratory, Institute of Neurology, London, UK. March 4, 2003 1 Introduction This chapter is an introduction to the multiple comparison problem in func-