Canterbury Bankstown Chapter 8 8.1 General Requirements

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Canterbury BankstownDevelopment ControlPlan 2021Chapter 8Employment Lands8.1General RequirementsDRAFT December 2020Canterbury Bankstown 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 1DRAFT December 2020

CONTENTSSection 1Introduction 3Section 2Business Development Precincts .5Section 3Enterprise Corridors .8Section 4Business Parks .16Section 5Site Facilities .18Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 2DRAFT December 2020

SECTION 1–INTRODUCTIONExplanationConnective City 2036 recognises the importance of employment lands in the economy.Employment lands are well–connected to Sydney’s major road routes and freight network,and support the delivery of jobs and urban services to meet community needs. Key actions ofConnective City 2036 are to protect and enhance employment lands to provide a greaterrange of jobs, and to boost these places as quality locations to do business.Canterbury Bankstown Local Environmental Plan 2021 and Canterbury BankstownDevelopment Control Plan 2021 combine to regulate effective and orderly development,consistent with Connective City 2036.Canterbury Bankstown Local Environmental Plan 2021 is Council's principal planningdocument. It provides objectives, zones and development standards such as lot sizes, floorspace ratios and building heights.Canterbury Bankstown Development Control Plan 2021 supports the LEP by providingadditional objectives and development controls to enhance the function, design and amenityof employment lands within Zones B5 Business Development, B6 Enterprise Corridor and B7Business Park.ObjectivesO1To ensure development is compatible with the desired character of the employmentlands.O2To enhance the amenity for people who work in, live in and visit the employment lands.O3To facilitate ecologically sustainable development.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 3DRAFT December 2020

Desired CharacterC1Business Development PrecinctThe Business Development Precinct will provide a range of contemporary business,warehouse and specialised retail uses that require large floor areas. It is limited to locationsthat are close to, and that support the viability of, commercial centres.C2Enterprise CorridorThe Enterprise Corridor will encourage contemporary business uses and urban services alongmain roads that benefit from high levels of exposure. Retail activity is limited to ensure thatenterprise corridors do not detract from the centres hierarchy. Opportunities for urbanconsolidation along busy roads are to be pursued. Certain key development sites mayaccommodate certain residential uses only as part of mixed use development, if consideredappropriate.C3Business ParkThe Business Park will accommodate contemporary office and light industrial uses, includinghigh technology industries in a generous landscape setting. It performs vital economic andemployment roles, and is in the form of a large campus–style business park.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 4DRAFT December 2020

SECTION 2–BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT PRECINCTSExplanationConnective City 2036 and Council’s Employment Lands Strategy identify business developmentprecincts as employment lands within Zone B5 Business Development that promote gooddesign and amenity for workers and visitors.Good design provides a solid basis for a high quality, comfortable environment for people. Itachieves a building form that is appropriate to the desired character of the street andsurrounding buildings. It achieves a building form that defines the public domain, providesinternal amenity and considers neighbours’ amenity.As part of the design process, applicants must note that a building envelope is not a building,but a three dimensional shape that may determine the bulk and siting of a building. Afterallowing for building articulation and other development controls, the achievable floor spaceof a development is likely to be less than the building envelope.ObjectivesO1To provide storey limits.O2To achieve good design in terms of building form, bulk, architectural treatment, visualamenity and landscape.O3To ensure the building form and design provide appropriate amenity to people whowork in and visit the business development precincts.O4To provide deep soil zones to manage urban heat and water, and to allow for andsupport healthy plant and tree growth.O5To ensure development is compatible with the prevailing suburban character andamenity of neighbouring residential areas.Development ControlsStorey limit (not including basements)2.1The storey limit for development is 2 storeys. Council does not allow development tohave attics.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 5DRAFT December 2020

Setbacks2.2Development must provide:(a) a minimum 5 metre setback to the primary and secondary street frontages; and(b) a minimum 6 metre setback to all other site boundaries.2.3Development must provide a landscape buffer zone within the setback to the primaryand secondary street frontages, and preference is given to deep soil planting within thesetback to all other site boundaries.2.4Council may increase the minimum setbacks to the side and rear boundaries:(a) to maintain reasonable solar access or visual privacy to neighbouring dwellings; or(b) to avoid an easement or tree dripline on the site or adjoining sites.Building design2.5Development must articulate the facades to achieve a unique and contemporaryarchitectural appearance that:(a) unites the facades with the whole building form;(b) composes the facades with an appropriate scale and proportion that responds tothe use of the building and the desired contextual character;(c) combines high quality materials and finishes;(d) considers the architectural elements shown in the illustration to this clause; and(e) considers any other architectural elements to Council's satisfaction.Figure 2a: Architectural elementsArchitectural elements341contemporaryarchitectural appearance2clear glazed facade3contemporary roofdesign4projecting wall elements5sun shading devices6landscaped buffer zone7no front fences8signs integrated with thebuilding25186/7Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 6DRAFT December 2020

2.6Development may have predominantly glazed facades provided it does not causesignificant glare nuisance.2.7Development may incorporate an awning design that:(a) achieves a unique and contemporary architectural appearance; and(b) combines high quality materials and finishes.Access to sunlight2.8The design of buildings should achieve a northern orientation to maximise solar access.2.9The design of buildings must ensure that:(a) At least one living area of a dwelling on an adjoining site must receive a minimum3 hours of sunlight between 8.00am and 4.00pm at the mid–winter solstice.Where this requirement cannot be met, the development must not result withadditional overshadowing on the affected living areas of the dwelling.(b) A minimum 50% of the required private open space for a dwelling that adjoins adevelopment receives at least 3 hours of sunlight between 9.00am and 5.00pm atthe equinox. Where this requirement cannot be met, the development must notresult with additional overshadowing on the affected private open space.Development adjacent to residential zones2.10 In determining a development application that relates to a site adjoining land in ZoneR2, R3 or R4, Council must take into consideration the following matters:(a) whether any proposed building is compatible with the height, scale, siting andcharacter of existing residential development within the adjoining residentialzone;(b) whether any goods, plant, equipment and other material used in carrying out theproposed development will be stored or suitably screened from residentialdevelopment;(c) whether the proposed development will maintain reasonable solar access toresidential development between the hours of 8.00am and 4.00pm at the mid–winter solstice;(d) whether noise generation from fixed sources or motor vehicles associated withthe proposed development will be effectively insulated or otherwise minimised;(e) whether the proposed development will otherwise cause nuisance to residents, byway of hours of operation, traffic movement, parking, headlight glare, securitylighting, fumes, gases, smoke, dust or odours, or the like; and(f) whether any windows or balconies facing residential areas will be treated to avoidoverlooking of private yard space or windows in residences.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 7DRAFT December 2020

SECTION 3–ENTERPRISE CORRIDORSExplanationConnective City 2036 and Council’s Employment Lands Strategy identify enterprise corridorsas employment lands within Zone B6 Enterprise Corridor that promote good design andamenity for workers, residents and visitors.Good design provides a solid basis for a high quality, comfortable environment for people. Itachieves a building form that is appropriate to the desired character of the street andsurrounding buildings. It achieves: A building form that defines the public domain, provides internal amenity and considersneighbours’ amenity. A building form with good proportions and a balanced composition of elements,reflecting the internal layout and structure.Good design also uses a variety of materials, colours and textures; and optimises safety andsecurity within the development and the public domain. It provides opportunities to promotesafety by maximising passive surveillance and defining secure access points that are visibleand well–lit.As part of the design process, applicants must note that a building envelope is not a building,but a three dimensional shape that may determine the bulk and siting of a building. Afterallowing for building articulation and other development controls, the achievable floor spaceof a development is likely to be less than the building envelope.ObjectivesO1To ensure enterprise corridors provide a distinctive and high quality environment foremployment and economic activities.O2To provide storey limits.O3To achieve good design in terms of building form, bulk, architectural treatment, visualamenity and landscape.O4To ensure the building form and design provide appropriate amenity to people whowork in, live in and visit the enterprise corridors.O5To ensure development is compatible with the prevailing suburban character andamenity of neighbouring residential areas.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 8DRAFT December 2020

O6To ensure facade designs and building footprints integrate into the overall building formand enhance the desired contemporary street character.O7To require a modern and interesting roof skyline.O8To ensure development integrates with the public domain and contributes to an activepedestrian orientated environment.O9To provide deep soil zones to manage urban heat and water, and to allow for andsupport healthy plant and tree growth.O10 To ensure front fences achieve an attractive streetscape and incorporate open styleconstruction such as spaced timber pickets or wrought iron.O11 To ensure the siting and design of buildings contribute to the personal and propertysecurity of people.O12 To encourage building designs, materials and maintenance programs that reduce theopportunities for vandalism and graffiti.O13 To ensure that a change of use from a dwelling in a residential flat building or shop tophousing to a serviced apartment does not impact on the amenity, safety or security ofresidents in the building.O14 To prevent substandard residential building design by way of converted servicedapartment development.Development ControlsStorey limit (not including basements)3.1The storey limit for development is 2 storeys. Council does not allow development tohave attics.Setbacks3.2Development must provide:(a) a minimum 5 metre setback to the primary and secondary street frontages; and(b) a minimum 6 metre setback to all other site boundaries.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 9DRAFT December 2020

3.3Council may increase the minimum setbacks to the side and rear boundaries:(a) to maintain reasonable solar access or visual privacy to neighbouring dwellings; or(b) to avoid an easement or tree dripline on the site or adjoining sites.Facade design3.4Development must articulate the facades to achieve a unique and contemporaryarchitectural appearance that:(a) unites the facades with the whole building form;(b) composes the facades with an appropriate scale and proportion that responds tothe use of the building and the desired contextual character;(c) combines high quality materials and finishes;(d) considers the architectural elements shown in Figure 3a; and(e) considers any other architectural elements to Council's satisfaction.Figure 3a: Architectural elementsArchitectural elements341contemporaryarchitectural appearance2clear glazed facade3contemporary roofdesign4projecting wall elements5sun shading devices6landscaped buffer zone7no front fences8signs integrated with thebuilding25186/73.5Development must architecturally treat blank walls that can be viewed from the streetand adjoining residential zoned land by incorporating public art, variation in buildingmaterials and/ or other architectural design methods which reflect contemporary andinteresting design.3.6The street facade of development on corner sites should incorporate architecturalcorner features to add visual interest to the streetscape.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 10DRAFT December 2020

3.7Development should restrict the use of the first storey (i.e. the ground floor) tocommercial or other non–residential uses:(a) to maintain employment floor space in the enterprise corridors; and(b) to maintain active street frontages in the enterprise corridors.3.8Development may have predominantly glazed facades provided it does not causesignificant glare nuisance.Roof design3.9Development must incorporate a high quality roof design that:(a) achieves a unique and contemporary architectural appearance; and(b) combines high quality materials and finishes.Awnings3.10 Development may incorporate an awning design that:(a) achieves a unique and contemporary architectural appearance; and(b) combines high quality materials and finishes.Front fences3.11 The maximum fence height for a front fence is 1.8 metres.3.12 The external appearance of a front fence along the street boundary of the site mustensure:(a) the section of the front fence that comprises solid construction (not including solidpiers) must not exceed a fence height of 1 metre above the ground level (existing);and(b) the remaining height of the front fence must comprise open style constructionsuch as spaced timber pickets or wrought iron that enhance and unify the buildingdesign.3.13 Council does not allow the following types of front fences along the street boundary ofthe site:(a) chain wire, metal sheeting, brushwood and electric fences; and(b) noise attenuation walls.Lighting3.14 The use of external lighting may accentuate the architectural form and features ofdevelopment provided it does not cause significant glare on adjoining residents.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 11DRAFT December 2020

3.15 The use of exterior wall mounted flood lights is permitted at the front of development,but not permitted at the rear of development unless it serves as security lighting.Access to sunlight3.16 The design of buildings should achieve a northern orientation to maximise solar access.3.17 The design of buildings must ensure that:(a) At least one living area of a dwelling on an adjoining site must receive a minimum3 hours of sunlight between 8.00am and 4.00pm at the mid–winter solstice.Where this requirement cannot be met, the development must not result withadditional overshadowing on the affected living areas of the dwelling.(b) A minimum 50% of the required private open space for a dwelling that adjoins adevelopment receives at least 3 hours of sunlight between 9.00am and 5.00pm atthe equinox. Where this requirement cannot be met, the development must notresult with additional overshadowing on the affected private open space.Landscaping3.18 Development must provide a landscape buffer zone within the setback to the primaryand secondary street frontages, and preference is given to deep soil planting within thesetback to all other site boundaries.3.19 Development must plant at least 1 street tree at 5 metre intervals along the length ofthe primary and secondary street frontages. Council may vary this requirement if astreet tree already exists in good condition, if an awning or site constraints limit theirinclusion, or a public domain plan is yet to determine the location of trees in a precinct.Entrances3.20 The main entrance or entrances to development must face the street.Building design and natural surveillance3.21 Windows to the living areas of front dwellings, or the windows on the upper floors ofdevelopment must overlook the street.3.22 Where the ground floor of development faces the street, the ground floor mustincorporate shopfront style windows with clear glazing so that pedestrians can see intothe premises and vice versa. The use of obscure or opaque glass, or other types ofscreening is discouraged.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 12DRAFT December 2020

3.23 Above ground car parking must be setback a minimum 6 metres from the front buildingline to allow the gross floor area at the front of the building to be used for commercialor other non–residential uses. This clause does not apply to the front building line thatfaces a rear lane.3.24 Lighting must be provided to the underside of an awning using vandal resistant, highmounted light fixtures.Security devices for commercial development3.25 The security door or grille to a shopfront facing the street must be transparent or anopen grille type shutter. A solid roller door or shutter is not permitted.Special requirements for development adjoining a railway corridor and open stormwaterdrains3.26 Where the site shares a boundary with a railway corridor or an open stormwater drain,any building, solid fence or car park on the site should, wherever practical, be setback aminimum 1.5 metres from that boundary. The setback distance must be:(a) treated with hedging or climbing vines to screen the building, solid fence, or carpark when viewed from the railway corridor or open stormwater drain; and(b) the hedging or climbing vines must be planted prior to the completion of thedevelopment using a minimum pot size of 300mm; and(c) the planter bed area must incorporate a commercial grade, sub–surface,automatic, self–timed irrigation system; and(d) the site must be fenced along the boundary using a minimum 2 metre high chain–wire fence; and(e) where a car park adjoins the boundary, hedging or climbing vines must also beplanted along the sides of any building or solid fence on the site that face therailway corridor or open stormwater drain.If a setback for landscaping under this clause is impractical, other means to avoid graffitimust be employed that satisfies Council’s graffiti minimisation strategy.Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1Page 13DRAFT December 2020

Development adjacent to residential zones3.27 In determining a development application that relates to a site adjoining land in ZoneR2, R3 or R4, Council must take into consideration the following matters:(a) whether any proposed building is compatible with the height, scale, siting andcharacter of existing residential development within the adjoining residentialzone;(b) whether any goods, plant, equipment and other material used in carrying out theproposed development will be stored or suitably screened from residentialdevelopment;(c) whether the proposed development will maintain reasonable solar access toresidential development between the hours of 8.00am and 4.00pm at the mid–winter sols

Canterbury Bankstown DCP 2021–Chapter 8.1 Page 10 DRAFT December 2020 3.3 Council may increase the minimum setbacks to the side and rear boundaries: (a) to maintain reasonable solar access or visual privacy to neighbouring dwellings; or (b) to avoid an easement or tree dripl