Reading Literature Reading Informational - BEST ABS

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Reading LiteratureReading InformationalWritingLanguageReading Foundational SkillsSpeaking and Listening400 pages! Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com

Table of ContentsReading Literature StandardsTeaching Notes/I Can Pagespages7 - 285.RL.1 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key29 - 345.RL.2 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key35 - 405.RL.3 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key41- 505.RL.4 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key51 - 545.RL.5 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key55 - 615.RL.6 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key62 - 665.RL.7 Teacher Planning Instructions675.RL.7 Assessment Day Instructions68 - 695.RL.7 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key70 - 765.RL.9 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key77 - 835.RL.10 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key84 - 88Reading Informational Standards Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.comTeaching Notes/I Can Pages90 - 1095.RI.1 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key110 - 1145.RI.2 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key115 - 1205.RI.3 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key121 - 1255.RI.4 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key126 - 1305.RI.5 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key131 - 1365.RI.6 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key137 - 1425.RI.7 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key143 - 1495.RI.8 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key150 - 1545.RI.9 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key155 - 1615.RI.10 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key162 - 166Writing StandardsTeaching Notes/I Can Pages168 - 191Teacher Letter1925.W.1 Teacher Planning Instructions1945.W.1 Assessment Day Instructions1955.W.1 Opinion Writing Planning Sheet1962

Table of ContentspagesWriting Standards5.W.1 Student Writing Booklet197 - 1985.W.1 Continuum Answer Key Papers199 - 2035.W.1 Scoring Rubric2045.W.2 Teacher Planning Instructions2055.W.2 Assessment Day Instructions2065.W.2 Informational Writing Planning Sheet2075.W.2 Student Writing Booklet208 - 2095.W.2 Continuum Answer Key Papers210 - 2145.W.2 Scoring Rubric2155.W.3 Teacher Planning Instructions2165.W.3 Assessment Day Instructions2175.W.3 Narrative Writing Planning Sheet2185.W.3 Student Writing Booklet219 - 2205.W.3 Continuum Answer Key Papers221 - 2265.W.3 Scoring Rubric227Writing Substandards5.W.1a Assessment and Answer Key230 - 2315.W.1b Assessment and Answer Key232 - 2335.W.1c Assessment and Answer Key234 - 2365.W.1d Assessment and Answer Key237 - 2385.W.2a Assessment and Answer Key239 - 2405.W.2b Assessment and Answer Key241 - 2435.W.2c Assessment and Answer Key244 - 2465.W.2d Assessment and Answer Key247 - 2495.W.2e Assessment and Answer Key250 – 2515.W.3a Assessment and Answer Key252 - 2545.W.3b Assessment and Answer Key255 - 2575.W.3c Assessment and Answer Key258 - 2605.W.3d Assessment and Answer Key261 - 2645.W.3e Assessment and Answer Key265 - 266 Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com3

Table of ContentsWriting Substandardspages5.W.5 Teacher Directions2675.W.5 Assessment and Answer Key268 - 2805.W.5 Scoring Rubric2815.W.6, 7, 8, 10 Teacher Directions2825.W.6, 7, 8, 10 Scoring Rubric2835.W.9a Text, Assessment, and Answer Key284 - 2875.W.9b Text, Assessment, and Answer Key288 - 291Reading Foundational Skills StandardsTeaching Notes/I Can Pages293 - 2975.RF.3 Teacher Directions2985.RF.3 Assessment Example2995.RF.3 Assessment and Answer Key300 - 3055.RF.4 Teacher Directions3065.RF.4 Teacher Directions – Scoring3075.RF.4 Scoring Sheet3085.RF.4 Assessment309 - 314Language StandardsTeaching Notes/I Can Pages316 - 3315.L.1a Assessment and Answer Key332 - 3355.L.1b Assessment and Answer Key336 - 3395.L.1c Assessment and Answer Key340 - 3415.L.1d Assessment and Answer Key342 - 3455.L.1e Assessment and Answer Key346 - 3495.L.2a Assessment and Answer Key350 - 3515.L.2b Assessment and Answer Key352 - 3555.L.2c Assessment and Answer Key356 - 3575.L.2d Assessment and Answer Key358 - 3615.L.2e Assessment and Answer Key362 - 3635.L.3a Assessment and Answer Key364 - 369 Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com4

Table of ContentspagesLanguage Standards5.L.3b Assessment and Answer Key370 - 3735.L.4a Assessment and Answer Key374 - 3795.L.4b Assessment and Answer Key380 - 3835.L.4c Assessment and Answer Key384 - 3875.L.5a Assessment and Answer Key388 - 3935.L.5b Assessment and Answer Key394 - 3955.L.5c Assessment and Answer Key396 - 3995.L.6 Assessment and Answer Key400 - 403Speaking and Listening StandardsTeaching Notes/I Can Pages405 - 417Teacher Letter418Teacher Directions419Assessment Example420 - 4215.SL.1a Rubric4225.SL.1b Rubric4235.SL.1c Rubric4245.SL.1d Rubric4255.SL.1a-d Standards Scoring Sheet4265.SL.2 Rubric and Standards Scoring Sheet427 - 4285.SL.3 Rubric and Standards Scoring Sheet429 - 4305.SL.4 Rubric and Standards Scoring Sheet431 - 4325.SL.5 Rubric and Standards Scoring Sheet433 - 4345.SL.6 Rubric and Standards Scoring Sheet435 - 436Additional Information For 5.RL.7 Video437 - 438Credits439 - 440 Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com5

Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.1Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.1:Core Content: Reading Literature: Key Ideas and DetailsStandard 1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the textsays explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Show an understanding before reading, while reading, and after reading a text in order to figure outand explain the main ideas (both explicitly stated as well as inferred) of a text.- Summarize a text.- Understand and explain what is directly stated in a text by citing specific details and examples fromthe text.- Understand and explain inferences, generalizations, and conclusions formed about a text, by citingspecific details and examples from that text.- Synthesize information and ideas after reading a text.- Make predictions about a text and confirm or refute predictions.- Connect prior knowledge to a text.- Defend a selection of textual evidence when responding to questions about a text.- Understand when to paraphrase a text versus directly quoting a text when responding to questionsabout the text.- Use quotations from the text in their writing. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com7

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.1I can:I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com8

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.2Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.2:Core Content: Reading Literature: Key Ideas and DetailsStandard 2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from detailsin the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond tochallenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic;summarize the text.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Summarize a text both orally and in writing.- Understand the difference between summarizing and paraphrasing a text.- Include key events from the beginning, middle, and end of a text when summarizing both orally andin writing.- Understand the character conflict(s) in a text.- Understand how the characters respond to a conflict(s) in a text.- Understand and explain details about the characters in a text in order to infer a theme.- Understand and explain details about the setting in a text in order to infer a theme.- Know and explain the parts of a plot including rising action, climax, and falling action.- Understand and explain the plot in a text in order to infer a theme.- Understand the key details and events in a text and/or poem as they relate to the speaker's point ofview about a topic in the text and/or poem.- Connect and understand how an author uses specific details to convey a theme in a text and/orpoem. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com9

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.2I can:I can:I can:I can:I can: Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 10

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.2I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 11

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.3Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.3:Core Content: Reading Literature: Key Ideas and DetailsStandard 3: Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings,events in a story or dramas, drawing on specific details in the text.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Understand and explain similarities amongst characters and their specific traits.- Understand and explain how similarities in characters' traits affect the plot of a text.- Understand and explain differences amongst characters and their specific traits.- Understand and explain how differences in characters' traits affect the plot of a text.- Understand and explain similarities amongst different settings in a text.- Understand and explain how similarities amongst settings affect the mood of the plot in a text.- Understand and explain differences amongst different settings in a text.- Understand and explain how differences amongst settings affect the mood of the plot in a text.- Understand and explain similarities and differences amongst different events in a text.- Understand and explain how different events in a text affect characters, mood, and plot.- Identify elements of characterization that an author uses (for example, the character of Dylanalways wears dark or black clothes; can the author be hinting that Dylan is the bad guy?). Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 12

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.3I can:I can:I can:I can:I can: Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 13

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.3I can:I can:I can:I can:I can: Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 14

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.3I can:I can:I can:I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 15

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.4Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.4:Core Content: Reading Literature: Craft and StructureStandard 4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they areused in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors andsimiles.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Distinguish between literal and figurative language.- Think about the ways in which a text would be different if it used literal language instead offigurative language.- Understand and explain how word choice affects the meaning of a text.- Use context clues, reference materials, knowledge of roots, and prefixes, etc., to determinemeanings of unknown words or phrases.- Examine the word choices an author uses to determine the effect they are trying to portray to thereader.- Examine the types of figurative language and imagery an author uses to determine the effect theyare trying to portray to the reader. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 16

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.4I can:I can:I can:I can: Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 17

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.4I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 18

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.5Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.5:Core Content: Reading Literature: Craft and StructureStandard 5: Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fittogether to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, orpoem.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Read a wide variety of texts in order to differentiate between the various text features.- Notice structural elements in a text.- Learn the terms associated with structure such as “scene” and “stanza.”- Understand and explain the relationship among structural elements in a text (e.g. flashbacks,foreshadowing, etc.). Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 19

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.5I can:I can:I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 20

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.6Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.6:Core Content: Reading Literature: Craft and StructureStandard 6: Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of viewinfluences how events are described.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Understand the differences in narrative voice (first person, third person, narrator, etc.).- Understand the difference between narrative point of view (as above) and point of view as in one’sbiases or opinion on a situation (often referred to as perspective).- Compare texts told from differing points of view.- Understand the usage of words to determine the point of view of a text.- Understand and explain the effect of the narrator's or speaker's point of view on other elements ofthe text like characters, events, etc. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 21

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.6I can:I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 22

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.7Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.7:Core Content: Reading Literature: Integration of Knowledge and IdeasStandard 7: Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute tothe meaning, tone, or beauty of a text.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Watch movies based on an original text or read the original text from which a movie was based,and note the differences in the versions. Students should also be able to think about why thosechanges might have been necessary.- Recognize the different forms of gathering information (e.g. written words, pictures, listening toaudio, etc.).- Think about how and when illustrations are helpful in a text.- Consider the ways that multimedia components (e.g. animation, sound effects, music, etc.)enhance a presentation.- Understand and explain the difference between tone and mood. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 23

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.7I can:I can:I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 24

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.9Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.9:Core Content: Reading Literature: Integration of Knowledge and IdeasStandard 9: Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g.,mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themesand topics.Examples: Mysteries, or adventure Poetry, or song Autobiography or biography Realistic fiction, non-fiction, and historical fiction Sci-fi or fantasySkills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Understand the differences between genres and sub-genres of a text (mystery, adventure,biography, science fiction, etc.).- Use strategies to identify the theme in order to compare the themes of different texts.- Use knowledge of setting, plot, characterization, and other elements of a story in order to comparedifferent stories of the same genre. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 25

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.9I can:I can:I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 26

Standards Based Assessment5.RL.10Student Skills/Concepts and Vocabulary for 5.RL.10:Core Content: Reading Literature: Range of Reading and Complexity ofTextStandard 10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature,including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5text complexity band independently and proficiently.Skills and/or Concepts for StudentsStudents should be able to:- Practice attentive reading of both assigned texts and independent text choices.- Read a wide variety of texts.- Self-monitor and self-correct when reading a text.- Select specific texts that allow them to be challenged as a reader. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 27

Name:Date:Standards Based Assessment5.RL.10I can:Testing InformationAssessment TypeDate t Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 28

To be usedwith:5.RL.1Standards Based AssessmentThe ElevatorBy: Wim Coleman and Pat PerrinLast week, my best friend Adrianna and I decided to have lunch at theSkyview Restaurant. It’s on the top floor of the Bernard Building downtown. Whenwe got into the elevator, Adrianna noticed something odd.“Look at all these buttons!” she said.Sure enough, the numbered buttons for the different floors had really weirdlabels on them. I can’t remember all of them, but the basement was “CENTER OFTHE EARTH.” The third floor was “SUMMIT OF MOUNT EVEREST,” and the tenth floorwas “SURFACE OF THE MOON.”“Wow!” I said with surprise, “I didn’t see all those crazy places the last time Icame here. Now this elevator is like some kind of spaceship.”“Or like some kind of a big mole that burrows underground,” Adriannaadded. “What do you say we check out the ‘center of the earth’?”“I’d really rather not,” I replied. “I’ve read that it’s solid iron down there, andthe temperature is almost ten thousand degrees.”“That doesn’t sound comfortable!” Adrianna agreed with a groan.“What about the ‘summit of Mount Everest’?” I suggested. “It’s about fivemiles up, and it’s the highest place on earth. The view should be great fromthere.”“That’s not such a good idea,” Adrianna said. “I’ve heard that the air is sothin, you have to carry a tank of oxygen with you just so you can breathe. It’s allice and snow, and we’re not dressed for the cold. But maybe we could go to the‘surface of the moon.’”“That’s probably not the best choice, either,” I replied. “Temperatures therecan get colder than the top of Mount Everest and also really hot—hundreds ofdegrees.”“That’s not as hot as the center of the earth,” Adrianna remarked thoughtfully.“No, but it would still be blistering for us,” I insisted firmly. “Besides, there isn’tany air on the Moon, so we wouldn’t last a minute without space suits.”So we took the elevator to the top floor and ate at the Skyview Restaurant,just like we’d planned to begin with. I ordered a bacon, lettuce, and tomatosandwich and Adrianna had a tofu burger. The sandwiches were delicious, andthe view from the Skyview Restaurant is always wonderful. As for the other placeswhere that elevator goes, you can use your own judgment. But be careful thatyou’re dressed properly. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 29

To be usedwith:5.RL.1Standards Based AssessmentThe TunnelBy: Wim Coleman and Pat PerrinGregory stared at the huge hole in the concrete wall across the creek. Thewall itself looked just like it did every other day. It was an ordinary, sandy graysupport for the bridge overhead. But a large hole had suddenly appeared in thatwall. The opening was so dark that he couldn’t even tell how deep it was.“Is that a cave?” he wondered. “Or maybe a tunnel? But what is it doingthere and how did it just appear out of nowhere?”Gregory scrambled to his feet and glanced nervously around the ravinewhere he’d been sitting. A rocky creek, bordered on both sides by weedy banks,ran beneath the bridge. The water sparkled in the sunshine. The ravine’s slopingsides were thick with underbrush. He could hear distant traffic, the trickling of thelittle stream, and the faint chatter of birds.This was usually a perfectly normal place where hardly anyone ever came.That’s why Gregory sometimes stopped here on his way home from school. Itgave him a few moments of peace and quiet when life got hard to handle. Buttoday this place didn’t seem at all peaceful. Gregory had a strong urge to climbout of the ravine and go home, but his curiosity wouldn’t let him do that.Instead of leaving, Gregory took one long stride, then leaped across thecreek. The high, arched hole was right in front of him now. It was completely darkinside. Carefully, holding one hand out in front of him, Gregory stepped throughthat entrance and into the tunnel. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 30

Name:5.RL.1Date:Standards Based AssessmentScoreInstructions: Read the passage titled The Elevator and answer questions 1, 2, and 3below.1.) What is an inference you can make about The Elevator?a.) The characters had never been away from home without their parents.b.) It was warm outside because neither of the characters were dressed for the cold.c.) It was raining outside that day.d.) The characters wanted to eat lunch somewhere else.2.) Which specific details from The Elevator support that this is a normal elevator,and NOT a magical elevator? Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 31

Name:5.RL.1Date:Standards Based AssessmentScore3.) Is this the first time the narrator in The Elevator has been to the SkyviewRestaurant? Support your answer by quoting directly from the text.Instructions: Read the passage titled The Tunnel and answer questions 4 and 5below.4.) In The Tunnel, which of the following statements is NOT an inference you canmake about Gregory?a.) Gregory sometimes needs to get away from other people.b.) Gregory's curiosity is very strong.c.) Gregory sometimes has a hard time handling problems in his life.d.) Gregory does not have many friends at school.5.) Which details from The Tunnel support the inference that Gregory sometimeslikes to be left alone? Quote the details directly from the text. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 32

5.RL.1Standards Based AssessmentInstructions: Read the passage titled The Elevator and answer questions 1, 2, and 3below.1.) What is an inference you can make about The Elevator?a.) The characters had never been away from home without their parents.b.) It was warm outside because neither of the characters were dressed for the cold.c.) It was raining outside that day.d.) The characters wanted to eat lunch somewhere else.2.) Which specific details from The Elevator support that this is a normal elevator,and NOT a magical elevator?*Answers may vary. Example:1.) The elevator is in a building, not any magical or fictional place.2.) There is nothing special about the elevator itself that is mentioned that would allow itto travel to any of the locations.3.) The narrator indicated that she had been in the elevator before, and the buttonswere not labeled the same way.4.) The characters never actually travel to any of the locations, proving that it is morethan their imagination.5.) The elevator takes the characters to a restaurant where they have lunch. There isnothing magical about that. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 33

5.RL.1Standards Based Assessment3.) Is this the first time the narrator in The Elevator has been to the SkyviewRestaurant? Support your answer by quoting directly from the text.*Answers may vary. Example:No, this is not the first time the narrator has been to the Skyview Restaurant. Thequotes from the text that support this answer include:“I didn’t see all those crazy places the last time I came here. Now this elevator islike some kind of space ship.”"The sandwiches were delicious, and the view from the Skyview Restaurant isalways wonderful."Instructions: Read the passage titled The Tunnel and answer questions 4 and 5below.4.) In The Tunnel, which of the following statements is NOT an inference you canmake about Gregory?a.) Gregory sometimes needs to get away from other people.b.) Gregory's curiosity is very strong.c.) Gregory sometimes has a hard time handling problems in his life.d.) Gregory does not have many friends at school.5.) Which details from The Tunnel support the inference that Gregory sometimeslikes to be left alone? Quote the details directly from the text.*Answers may vary. Example:The quotes from the text that support the inference that Gregory sometimes likes tobe left alone include the fact that coming to the ravine gave him a few moments ofpeace and quiet when life got hard to handle. Also, the text says that this was a placewhere hardly anyone ever came. These details help the reader infer that Gregorysometimes likes to be left alone. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 34

To be usedwith:5.RL.2Standards Based AssessmentTheseus and the BoulderBy: Wim Coleman and Pat PerrinIn Greek mythology, Theseus was a great adventurer. But during his childhood, his mother, Aethra,wouldn’t let him leave his home town of Troezen. This short play explains why.[The scene is a yard in the town of Troezen. A large round boulder sits in the center of the stage.THESEUS and his mother, AETHRA, enter.]THESEUS: But this isn’t fair, Mother.AETHRA: I don’t see what’s unfair about it.THESEUS: Every year around this time, you tell me to move this stupid boulder.AETHRA: It’s an eyesore, and I want to put a little vegetable garden here.THESEUS: You’ve been telling me that since I was six! And you started making me tryto move it back then! I was way too little.AETHRA: You’re not six anymore, Theseus. You’re sixteen.THESEUS: I couldn’t even budge it last year, and I won’t be able to move it now.AETHRA: How will you know until you try? You’ve been jogging, working out in thegym, and you’re the star of the wrestling team. You’re getting stronger every day.I’ll bet you can move it this time.THESEUS: And I’ll bet that I can’t. Anyway, the whole thing’s silly. It’s time I got outof this little town and went to Athens. That’s where I can really make my name inthe world and get started on some adventures. And Father is the king there.AETHRA: King Aegeus will have to wait until I think you’re ready.THESEUS: And when will that be?AETHRA: That’s for me to decide. Now be a good son and move this boulder foryour mother.THESEUS: Do I have to?AETHRA: You have to.[THESEUS sighs and walks over to the boulder, which is almost as tall as he is. Heputs his shoulder against it and tries to push it.]THESEUS: Ugh! There! It didn’t move an inch.AETHRA: I’m not so sure. I thought I saw it budge. Try again.THESEUS: But Mother—AETHRA: Go on and try.continued on the next page. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 35

To be usedwith:5.RL.2Standards Based AssessmentTheseus and the BoulderBy: Wim Coleman and Pat Perrin[THESEUS pushes against the boulder again.]THESEUS: Hey! I think I felt it move just a little!AETHRA: Keep on pushing.[THESEUS pushes against the boulder again.]THESEUS: That time it really did move—and I see something under it.AETHRA: Again.[THESEUS pushes against the boulder again.]THESEUS: I see something made of leather, and something made of steel.AETHRA: Just a little more.[THESEUS pushes against the boulder, which moves aside. Underneath it are a pairof sandals and a sword.]THESEUS: What’s this? [crouching down to look at the objects] A pair of fine sandalsand a sharp, shining sword. They look as though they were left here just yesterday.[THESEUS pushes against the boulder again.]AETHRA: Take a look at the name carved on the sword blade.THESEUS [reading]: “Aegeus, King of Athens.” My father’s name!AETHRA: It’s your father’s sword. He put it and the sandals under the boulder whenyou were just a baby. He told me to keep you right here in Troezen until you werestrong enough to move the boulder and claim them as your own. And now, puton those sandals and strap on that sword. It’s time for you to go to Athens andmeet your father. Just be sure to have many adventures on your way, do all kindsof heroic things, and become famous by the time you get there. Come on, let’sstart packing your bag. When you come back to visit, we’ll plant that garden I’vebeen talking about.[AETHRA starts walking away.]THESEUS: But Mother [AETHRA stops and turns toward him.]THESEUS: Why didn’t you ever tell me what was under the boulder?AETHRA: What is life without a few surprises?[AETHRA and THESEUS exit.] Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 36

Name:5.RL.2Date:Standards Based AssessmentScoreInstructions: Read the play titled Theseus and The Boulder and answer thequestions below.1.) Read the following lines from the play:THESEUS: I couldn't even budge it last year, and I won't be able to move it now.AETHRA: How will you know until you try? You’ve been jogging, working out in thegym, and you’re the star of the wrestling team. You’re getting strongerevery day. I’ll bet you can move it this time.What do these lines from the play reveal about Aethra and Theseus?a.) Aethra and Theseus are both sure he will never move the boulder.b.) Theseus is trying to move the boulder, but Aethra doesn't believe in him.c.) Aethra doesn't believe that Theseus is old enough to leave, and Theseus believes that he isold enough to leave.d.) Aethra is trying to help Theseus grow up, and Theseus doubts that he can move theboulder.2.) How did Theseus's feelings about moving the boulder change throughout thestory? Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 37

Name:5.RL.2Date:Standards Based AssessmentScore3.) Identify the conflict of Theseus and the Boulder. Explain how the conflict isresolved.4.) Write a one-paragraph summary of Theseus and the Boulder. Use key detailsfrom the passage to write your summary.5.) Which of the following is a main theme found in Theseus and the Boulder?a.) A boy is growing up.b.) A woman is leaving home.c.) A boy expects to stay home.d.) A king is returning home. Kristine Nanniniwww.youngteacherlove.blogspot.com 38

5.RL.2Standards Based AssessmentInstructions: Read the play titled Theseus and The Boulder and answer thequestions below.1.) Read the following lines from the play:THESEUS: I couldn't even budge it la

Reading Literature Standards Teaching Notes/I Can Pages 7 - 28 5.RL.1 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key 29 - 34 5.RL.2 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key 35 - 40 5.RL.3 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key 41- 50 5.RL.4 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key 51 - 54 5.RL.5 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key 55 - 61 5.RL.6 Text, Assessment, and Answer Key 62 - 66

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5 9 Informational Text - Close Reading Close reading Rigorous reading of informational text Creating deep understanding Determining what text says explicitly Making logical inferences Drawing conclusions about content Examining meaning thoroughly 10 Pa

Informational Texts: Nonfiction Passages and Exercises Based on the Common Core State Standards P.O. Box 658 Clayton, DE 19938 1 (800) 932-4593 www.PrestwickHouse.com Item No. 309306 Printed in the U.S.A. level 8 Reading Informational Texts: Nonfiction Passages and Exercises Based on the Common Core State Standards By Magedah Shabo and Stacey .