Corporate Legal Frame Work

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CORPORATE LEGAL FRAME WORKMBA 3RD SEMESTER STUDY MATERIALSANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT, KAKINADA

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWUNIT-- I: Significance of Business Laws—Indian Contract Act, 1872: Meaning andclassification of contracts—Essential of a valid contract—Performance ofacontract-- Discharge of contract—Remidies for breach of contract.UNIT-II:The Sale of Goods Act, 1930: Meaning and Essentials of contract of sale—Sale and Agreement to sell—Conditions and Warranties—Transferofproperty-- Performance of a contract of sale—Unpaid seller.UNIT-III: The Indian Partnership Act, 1932: Meaning and Essentials ofpartnership-- Registration of partnership—Kinds of partners—Rights and Liabilities of Partners—Relations partners to thirdparties—Dissolution.UNIT-IV: The Consumer Protection Act, 1986: Meaning of Consumer, Service,Goods, Deficiency, Defect, Unfair Trade Practices—Rights ofConsumers—Machinery for redressal of Grievances—Remedies availableto injured consumersUNIT-V:The Companies Act, 2013: Nature and Registration—Kinds of Companies—Memorandum of Association—Article of Association—Kinds of Shares—Powers and duties of Directors—winding up. SUGGESTED BOOKS:** N.D.Kapoor—Commercial Law—Sultan chand publishers, New Delhi.** S N Maheswaru & Suneed Maheswari—Commercial Laws—MayoorPaper Backs—NOIDA.** Tulisian P.C.—Business Laws—Tata Mc Graswhill Publishing house—. New Delhi** Kucchal—Business Law—Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi.** Avatar Singh—Mercantile Law--EBC—New Delhi.1SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWUNIT-- I: Significance of Business Laws—Indian Contract Act, 1872: Meaning andclassification of contracts—Essential of a valid contract—Performance of a contractDischarge of contract—Remidies for breach of contract.Introduction :Commercial law or business law is the body of law which governs business and commerceand is often considered to be a branch of civil law and deals both with issues of private lawand public law. Commercial law regulates corporate contracts, hiring practices, and themanufacture and sales of consumer goods. Many countries have adopted civil codes whichcontain comprehensive statements of their commercial law. In the United States, commerciallaw is the province of both the Congress under its power to regulate interstate commerce, andthe states under their police power. Efforts have been made to create a unified body ofcommercial law in the US: the most successful of these attempts has resulted in the generaladoption of the Uniform Commercial Code.Indian Contract Act 1872IntroductionThe Indian Contract Act brings within its ambit the contractual rights that have been grantedto the citizens of India. It endows rights, duties and obligations on the contracting parties tohelp them to successfully conclude business- from everyday life transactions to evidencingthe businesses of multi-national companies. The Indian Contract Act, 1872 was enacted on25th April, 1872 [Act 9 of 1872] and subsequently came into force on the first day ofSeptember 1872. The essence of the India Contract Act has been modelled on that of theEnglish Common Law.The extent of modifications made in the Act as per the Indian conditions and its adaptabilityto the Indian economy is an important area of research. In this regard it is pertinent to notethat since the enactment of the Act there have been no amendments and thus the Law thatwas made in 1872 still stands good. However, these are questions of interpretation that notonly depend on the text of the Act, but also on the English authorities that framed the law andbefore it, the subsequent development of law.The history of the Act brings to light the very origin of the economic processes and in thisregard, the importance of contracting in order to conduct one’s business in everyday life. Theprevalent system in the ancient times was barter and it was based on the mutual principle ofgive and take. This was confined to commodities as there was no medium of exchange as isseen in the form of money today and this system can be traced back in time to the IndusValley Civilization (the earliest human civilization). The system still finds relevance in thecontemporary world, where it can be found in commercially and economicallyunderdeveloped areas.However, the relevancy of such a system in modern times is questioned as the complexity inthe nature of the economic systems as well as the increasing demand and supply systems dueto the change in the wants and needs of the human beings came to the fore. Also, money hadevolved as the medium of exchange such that the value of every commodity could now be2SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWquantified. Thus, in such an era of greater economic transaction one finds the existence ofContract Laws and with it, their relevance.The Indian Contract Act codifies the way we enter into a contract, execute a contract andimplement provisions of a contract and effects of breach of a contract.Contract :A contract is a voluntary arrangement between two or more parties that is enforceable bylaw as a binding legal agreement. Contract is a branch of the law of obligations injurisdictions of the civil law tradition. Contract law concerns the rights and duties that arisefrom agreements.Contracts on the basis of creation:a) Express contract: Express contract is one which is made by words spoken orwritten. Example No. 1: X says to Y, will you buy a car for Rs. 100000? Y says toX, I am ready to buy you car for Rs. 100000. It is an express contract maderally. Example No. 2:X writes a letter to Y, I offer to sell my car for Rs. 100000 toyou. Y send a letter to Y, I am ready to buy you car for Rs. 100000. It is an expresscontract made in writing.b) Implied contract: An implied contract is one which is made otherwise than byworks spoken or written. It is inferred from the conduct of a person or thecircumstance of the particular case. Example: X, a coolie in uniform picks up thebag of Y to carry it from railway platform to the without being used by Y to do so andY allow it. In this case there is an implied offer by the coolie and an impliedacceptance by the passenger. Now, there is an implied contract between the coolie andthe passenger is bound to pay for the services of the coolie.c) Quasi or constructive contract: It is a contract in which there is no intention eitherside to make a contract, but the law imposes contract. In such a contract eights andobligations arise not by any agreement between the practice but by operation of law.e.g where certain books are delivered to a wrong address the addresses is under anobligation to either pay for them or return them.Contracts on the basis of execution:a) Executed contract: It is a contract where both the parties to the contract havefulfilled their respective obligations under the contract. Example: X offer to sell hiscar to Y for Rs. 1 lakh, Y accepts X offer. X delivers the car to y and Y pays Rs. 1lakh to X. it is an executed contract.b) Executory contract: It is a contract where both the parties to the contract have stillto perform their respective obligations. Example: X offers to sell his car to y for Rs. 1lakh. Y accepts X offer. It the car has not yet been delivered by X and the price hasnot yet been paid by Y, it is an Executory contract.c) Partly executed and partly executory contract: It is a contract where one of theparties to the contract has fulfilled his obligation and the other party has still toperform his obligation. E.g X offers to sell his car to y for Rs. 1 lakh on a credit of 1month. Y accepts X offer. X sells the car to Y. here the contract is executed as to Xand Executory as to Y.3SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWContracts on the basis of enforceability:a) Valid contract: A contract which satisfies all the conditions prescribed by law is avalid contract. E.g. X offers to marry y. y accepts X offer. This is a valid contract.b) Void Contract: the term void contract is described as under section 2(j) of I.CA,1872, A contract which cases to be enforceable by law becomes void when it ceasesto be enforceable. In other words, a void contract is a contract which is valid whenentered into but which subsequently became void due to impossibility of performance,change of law or some other reason. E.g. X offers to marry Y, Y accepts X offer.Later on Y dies this contract was valid at the time of its formation but became void atthe death of Y.c) Void Agreement: According to Section 2(g), an agreement not enforceable by law issaid to be void. Such agreements are void- ab- initio which means that they areunenforceable right from the time they are made. E.g. in agreement with a minor or aperson of unsound mind is void ab-initio because a mino or a person of unsound mindis incompetent to contract.d) Voidable contract: According to section 2(i) of the Indian contract act, 1872,arrangement which is enforceable by law at the option of one or more of the partiesthereon but not at the option of the other or other, is a voidable contract. In otherwords, A voidable contract is one which can be set aside or avoided at the option ofthe aggrieved party. Until the contract is set aside by the aggrieved party, it remains avalid contract. For e.g. a contract is treated as voidable at the option of the partywhose consent has been obtained under influence or fraud or misinterpretation. E.g. Xthreatens to kill Y, if the does not sell his house for Rs. 1 lakh to X. Y sells his houseto X and receives payment. Here, Y consent has been obtained by coercion and hencethis contract is void able at the option of Y the aggrieved party. If Y decides to avoidthe contract he will have to return Rs. 1 lakh which he had received from X. If Y doesnot exercise his option to repudiate the contract within a reasonable time and in themeantime Z purchases that house from X for 1 lakh in good faith. Y can not repudiatethe contract.e) Illegal Agreement: An illegal agreement is one the object of which is unlawful.Such an agreement cannot be enforced bylaw. Thus, illegal agreements are alwaysvoid – ab- initio (i.e. void from the very beginning) e.g. X agrees to y Rs. 1 lakh Ykills Z. Y kill and claims Rs. 1 lakh. Y cannot recover from X because the agreementbetween X and Y is illegal and also its object is unlawful.f) Unenforceable contract: It is contract which is actually valid but cannot be enforcedbecause of some technical defect (such as not in writing, under stamped). Suchcontracts can be enforced if the technical defect involved is removed. ESSENTIALS OF A VALID CONTRACTAccording to Section 10, “All agreements are contracts if they are made by the free consentof the parties competent to contract, for a lawful consideration and with a lawful object andare not hereby expressly declared to be void.”4SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWThe analysis of the provisions of Section 10 shows that a valid contract must have thefollowing essential elements:1.Proper Offer and Acceptance There must be at least two parties- one making theoffer and the other accepting it. Such offer a4ny acceptance must be valid. An offer to bevalid must fulfil certain conditions, such as it must intend to create legal relations, its term,must be certain and unambiguous, it must be communicated to the person to whom it is made,etc. An acceptance to be valid must folds certain conditions, such as it must be absolute andunqualified, it must be made in the prescribed manner, it must be communicated by anauthorised person before the offer lapses.2.Intention to Create Legal Relationship There must be an intention among the partiesto create a legal relationship. In case of social or domestic agreements, the usual presumptionis that the parties do not intend to create legal relationship but in commercial or businessagreements, the usual presumption is that the parties intend to create legal relationship unlessotherwise agreed upon.Example: X invited Y to a dinner Y accepted the invitation. It is a social agreement. IfX fails to serve dinner to Y, Y cannot go to the courts of law for enforcing the agreement.Similarly, if Y fails to attend the dinner, X cannot go to the courts of law for enforcing theagreement.But even a business agreement may not be enforceable by law where the agreement soprovides e.g. in Rose & Frank Co. v. Crompton Bros. (1925) A.C. 445, the agreement enteredinto stated that it will not be subject to legal jurisdiction in the law courts, the agreement wasnot enforceable by law as the parties never agreed to create legal obligations despite being abusiness agreement.3.Capacity of Parties The parties to an agreement must be competent to contract. Inother words, they must be capable of entering into a contract. According to Section 11 ofIndian Contract Act, 1872. “every person is competent to contract who is of the age ofmajority according to the law to which he is subject and who is of sound mind and is notdisqualified from contracting by any law to which he is subject.”In other words. the person must be major, must be of sound mind and must not bedeclared disqualified from contracting by any law to which he is subject. If the parties toagreement are not competent to contract, then no valid contract comes into existence.Example: X a minor borrowed Rs 8,000 from Y and executed mortgage of hisproperty in favour of the lender. This was not a valid contract because X is not competent tocontract. Therefore, the mortgage was not valid and the money advanced to minor could notbe recovered.4.Lawful Consideration An agreement must be supported by lawful consideration.Consideration means something in return. According to Section 23 of the Indian ContractAct, 1872, “the consideration is considered lawful unless it is forbidden by law or isfraudulent or involves or implies injury to the person or property of another or isimmoral or is opposed to public policy.”Example : X agrees to sell his car to Y for Rs. 1,00,000. Here Y’s promise to pay Rs.1,00,000 is the consideration for X’s promise to sell the car and X’s promise to sell the car isthe consideration for Y’s promise to pay 1,00,000.5SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFW5.Free Consent There must be free consent of the parties to the contact. According toSection 14, “Consent is said to be free when it is not caused by (i) coercion, (ii) undueinfluence, (iii) fraud, (iv) misrepresentation, or (v) mistake”. If the consent of the parties isnot free, then no valid contract comes into existence.Example: X threatens to kill Y if he does not sell his house to X. Y agrees to sell hishouse to X. In this case, Y’s consent has been obtained by coercion and therefore, it cannotbe regarded as free.6.Lawful Object The object of an agreement must be lawful. According to Section 23of the Indian Contract Act, 1872, “the object is considered lawful unless it is forbidden bylaw or is fraudulen1t or involves or implies injury to the person or property of another or isimmoral or is opposed to public policy.”Example : X, Y and Z enter into an agreement for the division among them of gainsacquired or to be acquired by them by fraud. The agreement is void because its object isunlawful.1Example II: X lets a flat on hire to Y a prostitute, knowing that it would be used for immoralpurposes. The agreement is void because its object is for immoral purposes.17. Agreement not Expressly Declared Void The agreement must not have been expresslydeclared void under the provisions of Sections 24 to 30 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872.Under these provisions, agreement in restraint of marriage, agreement in restraint of legalproceedings, agreement in restraint of trade and agreement by way of wager have beenexpressly declared void.Example : X promised to marry none else except Y and in default pay her Rs 1,00,000. Xmarried to Z and Y sued X for the recovery of Rs 1,00,000. It was held that Y was notentitled to recover anything because this agreement was in restraint of marriage and as suchvoid.8.Certainty of Meaning The terms of the agreement must be certain and unambiguous.According to Section 29 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872, “agreements the meaning of whichis not certain or capable of being made certain are void.” Example: X a dealer in differenttypes of oils agreed to sell 100 tonnes of oil to Y. This agreement is void on the ground ofuncertainty because it is not clear what kind of oil is intended to be sold. If, however, themeaning of the agreement could be made certain from the circumstances of the case, it willbe treated as a valid contract. Example: X who is a dealer in mustard oil, agreed to sell 100tonnes of oil to Y. This agreement is valid because the meaning of the agreement could beeasily ascertained from the circumstances of the case.9. Possibility of Performance The terms of the agreement must be such as are capable ofperformance. According to Section 56, “an agreement to do an impossible act is void.”Example : X agrees with Y to discover treasure by magic and Y agrees to pay Rs1,000 to X. This agreement is void because it is an agreement to do an impossible act.Example II: X agrees with Y to enclose some area between two parallel lines and Y agrees topay Rs 1,000 to X. This agreement is void because it is an agreement to do an impossible act.10. Legal Formalities The agreement must comply with the necessary formalities as towriting, registration, stamping etc. if any required in order to make it enforceable by law.Example : An oral agreement ‘for arbitration is unenforceable because the law requires thatarbitration agreement must e in writing.6SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWThe term ‘Performance of contract‘ means that both, the promisor, and the promisee havefulfilled their respective obligations, which the contract placed upon them. Forinstance, A visits a stationery shop to buy a calculator. The shopkeeper delivers the calculatorand A pays the price. The contract is said to have been discharged by mutual performance.Types of PerformancePerformrance, as an action of the performing may be actual or attempted.Actual Performance:When a promisor to a contract has fulfilled his obligation in accordance with the terms of thecontract, the promise is said to have been actually performed. Actual performance gives adischarge to the contract and the liability of the promisor ceases to exist. For example, Aagrees to deliver10 bags of cement at B’s factory and B promises to pay the price on delivery.A delivers the cement on the due date and B makes the payment. This is actual performance.Actual performance can further be subdivided into substantial performance, and partialPerformanceSubstantial Performance:This is where the work agreed upon is almost finished. The court then orders that the moneymust be paid, but deducts the amount needed to correct minor existing defect. Substantialperformance is applicable only if the contract is not an entire contract and is severable. Therationale behind creating the doctrine of substantial performance is to avoid the possibility ofone party evading his liabilities by claiming that the contract has not been completelyperformed. However, what is deemed to be substantial performance is a question of fact to bedecided in both the case. It will largely depend on what remains undone and its value incomparison to the contract as a whole.Partial PerformanceThis is where one of the parties has performed the contract, but not completely, and the otherside has shown willingness to accept the part performed. Partial performance may occurwhere there is shortfall on delivery of goods or where a service is not fully carried out.There is a thin line of difference between substantial and partial performance. The twofollowing points would help in distinguishing the two types of performance.Partial performance must be accepted by the other party. In other words, the party who isat the receiving end of the partial performance has a genuine choice whether to accept orreject. Substantial performance, on the other hand, is legally enforceable against the otherparty.Payment is made on a different basis from that for substantial performance. It is madeon quantum meruit, which literally means as much as is deserved. So, for example, if half ofthe work has been completed, half of the negotiated money would be payable. In case ofsubstantial performance, the party that has performed can recover the amount appropriate towhat has been done under the contract, provided that the contract is not an entire contract.The price is thus, often payable in such circumstances, and the sum deducted represents thecost of repairing defective workmanship.7SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWAttempted PerformanceWhen the performance has become due, it is sometimes sufficient if the promisor offers toperform his obligation under the contract. This offer is known as attempted performance ormore commonly as tender. Thus, tender is an offer of performance, which of course, complieswith the terms of the contract. If goods are tendered by the seller but refused by the buyer, theseller is discharged from further liability, given that the goods are in accordance with thecontract as to quantity and quality, and he may sue the buyer for.breach of contract if he sodesires. The rationale being that when a person offers to perform, he is ready, willing andcapable to perform. Accordingly, a tender of performance may operate as a substitute foractual performance, and can effect a complete discharge.In this regard, Section 38 of Indian Contract Act says:‘Where a promisor has made an offer of performance to the promisee, and the offer has notbeen accepted, the promisor is not responsible for non-performance, nor does he thereby losehis rights under the contract. For example, A contracts to deliver to B, 100 tons of basmatirice at his warehouse, on 6 December 2015. A takes the goods to B‘s place on the due dateduring business hours, but B, without assigning any good reason, refuses to take the delivery.Here, A has performed what he was required to perform under the contract. It is a case ofattempted performance and A is not responsible for non-performance of B, nor does hethereby lose his rights under the contract.’Discharge of a contract implies termination of contractual obligations. This is becausewhen the parties originally entered into the contract, the rights and duties in termsof contractual obligations were set up. Consequently when those rights and duties are putout then the contract is said to have been discharged. Once a contract stands discharged,parties to it are no more liable even though the obligations under the contract remainincomplete.A Contract is deemed to be discharged, that is, concluded and no longer binding, in thefollowing circumstances: Discharge by performance. Discharge of Contract by Substituted Agreement. Discharge by lapse of time. Discharge by operation of law. Discharge by Impossibility of Performance. Discharge by Accord and Satisfaction. Discharge by breach.We shall examine each of them as follows.Discharge by performanceWhere both the parties have either carried out or tendered (attempted) to carry out theirobligations under the contract, is referred to as discharge of the contract by performance.Because performance by one party constitutes the occurrence of a constructive condition, theother party’s duty to perform is also triggered, and the person who has performed has theright to receive the other party’ s performance. The overwhelming majority of contracts aredischarged in this way.8SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWDischarge of Contract by Substituted AgreementA contract emanates from an agreement between the parties. It thus follows that, the contractmust also be discharged by agreement. Therefore, what is required, inevitably, ismutuality. Discharge by substituted agreementarises when a contract is abandoned, or theterms within it are altered, and both the parties are in conformity over it.For example, A and B enter into some agreement, and A wants to change his mind and not tocarry out his terms of the contract. If he does this unilaterally then he will be in breach ofcontract to B. However, if he approaches B and states that he would like to be released fromhis liabilities under the contract then the latter might agree. In that case the contract is said tobe discharged by (bilateral) agreement. In effect B has promised not to sue A if he does notperform his part of the contract and the consideration for his promise is A ‘s promise not tosue B. Discharge by agreement may arise in the following ways.NovationThe term novation implies the substitution of a new contract for the original one. Thisarrangement may be either with the same parties or with different parties. For a novation tobe valid and effective, the consent of all the parties, including the new one(s), if any, isessential. Moreover, the subsequent or second agreement must be one capable of enforcementin law, the consideration for which is the exchange of promises not to enforce the originalcontract.RescissionThis refers to cancellation of all or some of the material terms of the contract. If thecontracting parties mutually decide to do so, the respective contractual obligations of theparties stand terminated.AlterationThis refers to a change in one or more of the terms of a contract with the consent of all thecontracting parties. Alteration results in a new contract but parties to it remain the same. Herethe assumption is that both the parties are to gain a fresh but different benefit from the newagreement. Remission This means the acceptance (by the promisee) of a lesser sum than whatwas contracted for, or a lesser fulfillment of the promise made. As per Section 63, ‘everypromisee may (a) remit or dispense with it, wholly or in part, or (b) extend the time ofperformance, or (c) accept any other satisfaction instead of performance’.WaiverThe term waiver implies abandonment or relinquishment of a right. Where a partydeliberately abandons its rights under the contract, the other party is released of itsobligations, otherwise binding upon it.Discharge by lapse of timeA contract stands discharged if not enforced within a specified period called the ‘period oflimitation‘. The Limitation Act, 1963 prescribes the period of limitation for various contracts.For instance, period of limitation for exercising right to recover an immovable property is9SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWtwelve years, and right to recover a debt is three years. Contractual rights become time barredafter the expiry of this limitation period. Accordingly, if a debt is not recovered within threeyears of its payment becoming due, the debt ceases to be payable and is discharged by lapseof time.Discharge by Impossibility of PerformanceSometimes after a contract has been established, something might occur, though not at thefault of either party, which can render the contract impossible to perform, or illegal, orradically different from that originally undertaken.However, if whatever happens to prevent the contract from being performed has not been caused by either party could not have been foreseen, and its effect is to destroy the basis of the contractthen the courts will, generality, state that the contract has become impossible to perform. Ifthat happens then the contract is discharged and neither party will have any liability under it.Section 56 of the Indian Contract Act clearly provides that an agreement to do an actimpossible in itself is voidThe performance of a contractual obligation may become subsequently impossible on anumber of grounds.Discharge of operation of lawA contract stands discharged by operation of law in the following circumstances.Unauthorized material alteration of a written documentA party can treat a contract discharged (i.e., from his side) if the other party alters a term(such as quantity or price) of the contract without seeking the consent of the former.Statutes of LimitationsA contract stands discharged if not enforced within a specified period called the ‘period oflimitation’. The Limitation Act, 1963 prescribes the period of limitation for various contracts.For instance, limitation period for exercising right to recover an immovable property istwelve years and right to recover a debt is three years. Contractual rights become time barredafter the expiry of this limitation period. Accordingly, if a debt is not recovered within threeyears of its payment becoming due, the debt ceases to be payable and is discharged by lapseof time.InsolvencyA discharge in bankruptcy will ordinarily bar enforcement of most of a debtor’s contracts.MergerA contract also stands discharged through a merger that occurs when an inferior rightaccruing to party in a contract amalgamates into the superior right ensuing to the same party.For instance, A hires a factory premises from B for some manufacturing activity for a year,but 3 months ahead of the expiry of lease purchases that very premises. Now since A hasbecome the owner of the building, his rights associated with the lease (inferior rights)subsequently merge into the rights of ownership (superior rights). The previous rentalcontract ceases to exist.10SANJEEV INSTITUTE OF PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Ch. Krishna Sita, Asst. Professor in FinanceCLFWDischarge by Accord and SatisfactionTo discharge a contract by accord and satisfaction; the parties must agree to a

a) Valid contract: A contract which satisfies all the conditions prescribed by law is a valid contract. E.g. X offers to marry y. y accepts X offer. This is a valid contract. b) Void Contract: the term void contract is described as under section 2(j) of I.CA, 1872, A contract which cases to be enforceable by law becomes void when it ceases

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Ref. Part No. Part Description Comments Revision Dwg 74545 Image No. 1. 300-318D HITCH BUSHING 2. 316-034D TRANSPORT CHAIN 3. 316-099D PIN HTCH C2-C3 10.25 L 4. 316-100D HITCH SPACER 5. 316-270H STORAGE LEGS 6. 316-290D HOSE GUIDE ROLLER 7. 316-433H PARM DIRECT MAIN FRAME WLDMNT Direct frame 7. 316-433H82 PARM DIRECT FRAME WELD ORANGE Direct frame (Orange) 7. 316-371H PARM INDP MAIN FRAME .