Simon And Katy Gittins Innovation And The Bar - Clerksroom

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Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsInnovation and the Bar Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike Whyatt BriefedOrlagh Kelly ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick WebberProfiles Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsAbsolute Barrister Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike WhyattSimon and Katy GittinsFounders and Barristers BriefedOrlagh KellyHusband and wife team disrupting andreinventing the legal industryInnovationAbsolute Barrister was the first company formed to takeadvantage of the direct access rules and its goal is tocontinue to drive innovation to allow better access to legalservices. Husband and wife team first founded AbsoluteBarrister under a different name in 2011.Absolute Barrister is an innovative, award-winning onlineservice connecting consumers and businesses directly toaffordable barristers for a wide range of legal matters,including divorce and family, finance, wills, property, andpersonal injury, employment, and IP.Their revolutionary user-friendly online platform allowsclients to manage their cases on any device.Absolute Barrister claims to be able to halve the costsof some legal matters, addressing the demand foraffordable, expert legal advice. ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin‘’ Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick WebberClients need to be made aware of thechoices they have and the optionsavailable to them in the legal market.The typical chambers model doesnot allow for long term thinking.If you draw a map of legal services now,it doesn’t work structurally.We’re going to make the market.—Simon Gittins, Absolute Barrister Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsHow they did itThe futureFormed from a belief that the big law hourly rates modelof legal advice is expensive, outdated, and does not putthe needs of clients with legal issues at the epicentre,Simon and Katy launched Absolute Barrister. AbsoluteBarrister is looking at ways to offer the best, mostcost effective advice to clients via technology enabledautomated processes.The industry needs to change – at present there are toomany structural and regulatory barriers to innovation.Regulators should focus on fairness rather thanprescriptive rules. Lawyers should be on the hook foronly reserved legal activities and not for administrativesupport tasks such as photocopying.Automating all existing legal functions through marketleading technology, Absolute Barrister have designed asystem to enable clients to access their case anywhere,anytime. They are AI ready and looking at next generationtechnology to provide more cost-effective solutions. Bar Council Direct Access PortalCost recovery is a barrier to technological investment.Cost recovery needs to return to fair principles rather thanspecifying limits. While a client pays less for an innovativelegal service, they can be prevented from recovering thoselower costs because the method by which these costs wereincurred is not a traditional hourly rate. Further, if a servicereduced the cost for legal advice to a couple of hundredpounds, the user would currently only be able to recover atcourt the transactional cost. How would providers recoverthe extensive capital needed to innovate to reduce the costof these services?Clients should be able to move between legal providersas clients become informed on the legal market andidentify the right lawyer for their case.Absolute Barrister will continue to challenge entrenchedworking practices to allow better access to expert costeffective legal advice and representation in court.As part of that process, Absolute Barrister have beenworking closely with the BSB before, during, and afterthe regulated entity pilot. It sees a number of barriers toinnovation that are without foundation in regulatory riskand which should be challenged in the interest of enablingbetter competition in favour of the consumer and which itsays have already ‘to some extent’ been recognised.The future is in open law – businesses and consumersshould have access to the law to conduct their ownlegal research.Prudence BeeverMike Whyatt BriefedOrlagh Kelly ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick Webber Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmithabsolutebarrister.com 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsBar Direct Access Portal Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike WhyattPrudence BeeverBarrister, St Johns Buildings BriefedOrlagh KellyMike Whyatt ClerksroomBarrister, 15 Winckley SquareStephen WardHarry HodgkinFounders of the Direct Access Portal, the largestdirectory of public access barristersInnovationPru and Mike, together with their partners, launched theBar Council Direct Access Portal, the only nationwidedirectory of public access barristers. They foundedthe portal themselves, before entering into an equalpartnership with the Bar Council. Pru and Mike continue towork in close collaboration with the Bar Council to providea fully comprehensive service to the public, the largestdirectory and therefore choice of public access barristers.For barristers, the Bar Council Direct Access Portal is a richsource of high quality work in all areas of law.‘’Clients need to be madeaware of the choices theyhave and the optionsavailable to them in thelegal market.We are moving towardsa different legalenvironment with morechoice for consumers. Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick WebberPublic access clientspay for work up front,and only then does itget done.We need to unclogthe court service fromLitigants in Person.The sky’s the limitfor the Bar.—Prudence Beever, St Johns Buildings Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsHow they did itThe futurePru and Mike saw a need for the portal when they werein chambers and saw the opportunities for public accesswork, in a climate of cuts to legal aid and the reductionin private law children work. However, chambers werestill resistant to public access given the understandableworry about losing goodwill from loyal solicitor clients.As such, rather than setting up individual direct accesswebsites for their own practices, they identified anopportunity for a national website showcasing directaccess barristers nationally, on which they would alsohave profiles.The legal market is starting to move fast. Whilegovernment changes and funding cuts make the climatechallenging, regulatory change has opened up newopportunities. Barristers can now qualify to undertakepublic access work and to conduct litigation, and ABSswill bring new opportunites.A defining principle was that the website should be free tobarristers and to the public – and this remains the case tothis day. Barristers can now be included if they pay the BarRepresentation Fee, and the site already includes between3,500 and 4,000 barristers, mediators, and arbitratorsnationwide, and is continuing to grow rapidly.Next steps will include further expansion, and theinclusion of carefully selected advertisers relevant to theBar and public. Bar Council Direct Access PortalThere will be a further rise in virtual chambers. Individualbarristers who do not want to be part of a physicalchambers structure can work from home. Most workcan be done digitally online, via eBundles, online casemanagement systems, and online library resources.Prudence BeeverMike Whyatt BriefedOrlagh Kelly ClerksroomStephen WardHarry HodgkinWill we end up with a converged, US-style legal system?There is movement in this direction, but solicitors andbarristers currently play different roles. Solicitors holdhands, barristers retain their objectivity to provide thebest possible representation. Forum ChambersConsumers should have access to the bestrepresentation to meet their needs – public accessbarristers can save clients money. Where clients requiremore handholding and benefit from the service of asolicitor, barristers can refer them to solicitors. Fountain CourtHow do we free the courts from litigants in persongiven the lack of public money to fund representationin courts? The rise in litigants in person is changingthe court system and slowing down processes. We alsoneed to review the position of unregulated services likeMcKenzie friend, and ensure that consumers have accessto the best representation.David McIlroyPatrick WebberPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers inckleysq.co.ukPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsBriefed Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike WhyattOrlagh KellyCEO and Barrister BriefedOrlagh KellyTechnology entrepreneur and data protection specialistfounded Briefed practice management and data protectioncompliance tools for barristers InnovationA barrister since 2003, Orlagh’s extensive experiencerepresenting clients in almost 2000 cases led to hersingle-handedly founding a legal technology companyand developing Briefed, the first mobile practicemanagement platform for barristers. Available inthe Apple iTunes store since 2003, Briefed is usedby barristers throughout the UK and Ireland. In 2017Orlagh expanded the Briefed offering to include theBarrister Data Protection Compliance Bundle, helpingbarristers meet their regulatory requirements under dataprotection legislation, the first of its kind on the market. ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin Forum Chambers‘’David McIlroyPatrick Webber Fountain CourtBarristers inevitably work very longhours delivering excellent service to theirclients. However, the right technologycan help them with some of the heavylifting, freeing up time they can spendtaking on more profitable work, or indeedsimply to have more free time. Clientsof Briefed tell us they save around eighthours per week. That’s an extra four daysa month they can make better use of.Paul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens—Orlagh Kelly, Briefed ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsHow they did itThe futureFaced with the challenges of the administrationsurrounding running a barrister’s practice – paperwork,tax, credit control, and client care – as well as the corefee-earning and advocacy of the job, Orlagh createdBriefed to free her up to more effectively practise law.Briefed is an online system for barristers to manage theircases and practice from their phone, tablet, or computer.Competition at the Bar, along with the pressures causedby extensive change, continue to increase pressure onbarristers. However, there are significant opportunitiesfor savvy barristers who see technology as a secretweapon helping them do more, better, and faster.Orlagh is keen to continue to find new solutions to helpbarristers deliver their legal expertise while runningprofitable, efficient businesses, and Briefed is nowintegrated with some chambers management solutionsto create a seamless end to end working relationshipbetween a barrister and their clerk, increasingprofitability for both the barrister and their chambers.Orlagh identified a gap in the market for a solutionspecific to the Bar. Matter management solutionsexisted for solicitors and for other professions butthere was nothing specific to the Bar. Existing chamberssolutions serviced the clerking team well, but barristerswere inevitably left with little or nothing to help themmanage their VAT, tax, legal drafting, or CPD activity. Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike Whyatt BriefedOrlagh Kelly ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick WebberDefining features of Briefed are its intuitive simplicityand ease of use. Orlagh ensured a clear, easy to useapproach remained key. Fountain CourtPaul MartenstynIn developing the technology for Briefed, Orlaghlearned about the data protection requirements oftechnology solutions which led to the idea to providedata protection training and compliance products.Briefed now provides barristers with a Data ProtectionCompliance Bundle with all the tools barristers need,such as training, risk assessment, document templates,and formal accreditation, to become data protectioncompliant. Due to its innovative online delivery, againusing bespoke and easy to use technology, barristersusing the Briefed product are able to meet theirregulatory requirements in an efficient and extremelycost effective manner. Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPbriefed.prothinkdataprotection.com Paul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsClerksroom Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike WhyattStephen WardManaging Director BriefedOrlagh KellyHarry Hodgkin ClerksroomBarristerStephen WardHarry HodgkinFounded unique award-winning chambers and built theonly purpose-built public access chambers software, nowused in over 200 chambersInnovationFormed by a clerk and two barristers out of the frustrationwith the traditional chambers model, Clerksroom is aunique award-winning chambers offering civil barristersfor all courts and tribunals in England & Wales. Operatingfrom a purpose-built headquarters in Taunton, it blends thetraditional chambers model and the unique independenceof the Bar with first-rate client care and innovative IT. It hasdeveloped the only purpose-built public access IT system inexistence, which is now used by over 200 other chambers.How they did itClerksroom continuously consider all areas of theirbusiness model and approach to plan for the challengesand opportunities of the future. They have differentbrands: Clerksroom, Clerksroom Direct, and ClerksroomMediation to cater to their different services anddifferent market segments.‘’Innovation is somethingyou do in order to survive.Innovation is adaptingwith eyes wide open.Over the last three tofive years, there has beenhuge change at the Bar.As such, every chambersin the country is lookingat what to do. Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick Webber Fountain CourtPaul MartenstynMergers are notnecessarily a sign ofdecline. People arestill doing the work, justin a new structure.Traditional structures areflawed and not designedfor innovation.Mediation is a growth area. —Stephen Ward, Clerksroom Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsThey structured Clerksroom as a limited company,leaving the barristers to focus on the law and thedirectors to focus on running the business. This makesdecision making quicker. It enables clear systemsfor investment and growth, and makes it easier toimplement strategy. Whereas the traditional chambersstructure focused on how to limit liability, theirapproach leaves them free to focus on growth.Adopting purpose-built offices and clerking operationsin the cost-effective location of Taunton, they have hadthe space designed for maximum effect.Clerksroom focus on client service and continuousimprovement. They have written an operations manualfor their barristers. They use data to provide effectivemanagement information and to focus on client service.They place client service at their heart, focusing onservice levels for tasks, and to report to firms, and makedecisions about management of the business.The futureThey adapted their structure for public access work. Whilethe average time from solicitor call to instruction is eightminutes, for lay clients it is 30 minutes. This necessitatesdifferent resourcing and they have recruited specific staffthen trained to assist members of the public.Innovative use of technology is key. They have built theirown regulatory compliant software system to cater forthe specific workflow for public access, including IDchecking, credit checking, POCA, conflict checking, andcard processing within the system so that they can trackfrom Google search all the way to payment. They havesold this to other chambers to make it more cost efficientto develop. They are also launching Billy.Bot, a robotclerk sitting on top of their services, and with accessto information via APIs, social media, and databases,including solicitors’ booking preferences, Linkedinconnections, chambers linked to their public accessportal, direct access qualified barristers, and barristers’clerks. Using natural language processing, Billy.Botcan find potential answers to basic questions. He canbe plugged into any major website where someoneis looking for a legal answer. He will also be able todirectly create cases and diary bookings, without clerkinvolvement, and signpost people to the relevant service.Mediation is a particular growth area, and over 17,000solicitors now use their mediation service, with over 76firms accessing it via their client portal. Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike Whyatt BriefedOrlagh KellyThe Bar must adapt to keep pace with the changingmarket. Chambers need to continually re-examine whatthe chambers and staff offer and how they can fulfil awider range of clients’ needs.With changing fee structures, chambers must engagein a continual drive to look at new areas of work, asClerksroom have done with mediation and public access.Chambers will need to look critically at the make-up oftheir work, and support barristers’ practice diversificationwhere needed.The biggest area of opportunity relating to public accessis prepayment. This avoids the cash flow delays typical ina traditional chambers.Public access work also opens up a huge new market,with good quality work, and in areas lending themselvesto the advice and representation at which the Bar excel.The development of its own public access softwaresystem has transformed the nature of its business. Frombeing a chambers of barristers, they have become a hubin the marketplace – a competitor to other chambers, asupplier and provider of software to them.The Bar has a changing relationship with the rest of themarket. There is a move from the traditional referral modelto being more of a hub, receiving work from solicitorsand the public, referring work to solicitors, and providingsoftware to other chambers.clerksroom.com ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick Webber Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsForum Chambers Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike WhyattDavid McIlroyBarrister and Head of Chambers BriefedOrlagh KellyPatrick Webber ClerksroomStephen WardHarry HodgkinSenior ClerkFounded Forum Chambers, a forward-thinkingboutique chambers specialising in commercial disputes Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick WebberInnovationThe members of Forum Chambers broke away from3PB and founded their own boutique set to focus oncommercial disputes. With a focus on streamlined clientservice, a small agile footprint, and technology, and withits close partnership between clerks and barristers, theset has formed a rapid reputation as leaders in the field.‘’Change is constant at theBar. Sets whose cost baseis too high or who can’tchange will be in danger.The traditional referralstructure is changing. Weare seeing more alliancesbetween solicitors andbarristers, such as solicitorspitching the Bar to clientsas part of their team, andundertaking joint businessdevelopment initiatives.The way in which clientsaccess legal services ischanging.Clients don’t want topay 50k to learn theyhave no case nowadays.We have become verygood at triage – takinga quick look anddetermining whethera client has a case.—David McIlroy, Forum ChambersClerks need to knowwhat they are selling.—Patrick Webber, Forum Chambers Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddens ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsHow they did it Bar Council Direct Access PortalLeaving a larger set enabled Forum Chambers to growand develop a specialist practice. Forming a boutique setenabled more streamlined client service, greater control ofmarketing, practice development, business development,and IT. It also enabled the formation of tailored service andgreater agility and ability to change. Through small officesnear the Inns in London and serviced offices in Bristol andManchester, chambers can serve the major centres.Costs are increasingly an issue – they work with ATEinsurers and litigation funders to enable the client tooffload the risk of litigation.Clients expect teamwork; barristers are increasingly nowpart of a team. Whereas previously the Bar focused purelyon intellect, now increasingly the starting point is softskills and whether individuals can work with clients and aspart of a team.The futureForum Chambers are using Apple technology and lookingat new technology to streamline practice and chambers.Barristers need to be able to leverage technology to runtheir practice effectively and efficiently. Use of electronicrather than print sources of information is key. Electronicworking and eFile storage and paperless working meanthat lots of space is no longer needed. But they work hardto ensure that technology does not replace the collegialityof being in chambers.Clients are under pressure to deliver more and they haveworked hard to address this in a number of ways. ‘Wehave become very good at triage, taking a quick lookand working out whether the client has a case. Clientsnowadays don’t want to pay 50k to learn that they haveno case.’ (David McIlroy, Forum Chambers)Having a specialist dedicated clerking team – and a smallfocused set with a specific niche means that clerks areable to fully understand the barristers’ practice, and tounderstand the product they are selling.The working environment is key to talent recruitmentand retention. Barristers may no longer stay with one setthroughout their career.Prudence BeeverMike Whyatt BriefedOrlagh Kelly ClerksroomStephen WardHarry HodgkinThe way in which clients access legal services is changing– there is a ‘move from the traditional referral model to amore complex web of interactions with other areas of thelegal market.’ (David McIlroy, Forum Chambers)The structure of chambers will change – the introductionof ABSs will mean that chambers can be structuredmore easily to enable barristers and staff to share in thesuccess of the business.Barristers need to look at developing areas of work, trendsin work, and anticipate future trends. They need to positionthemselves as thought leaders in these areas to ensure thatthey then get the cases in these areas as they arise.Future barristers will need different skills than they dida few years ago. The ability to work in teams, to leveragetechnology to improve efficiency and to engage incontinuous improvement will be key. Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick Webber Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddensforumchambers.com ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsFountain Court Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike WhyattPaul MartenstynDeputy Senior Clerk BriefedOrlagh KellyFlexibility, cost-effectiveness, and independence translateinto a business model which will serve the Bar well in arapidly changing world.How they did itThe modern chambers, and the unique model ofcatering to self-employed barristers requires aparticular deftness and lightness of touch. It is likehaving 80 law firms under one roof.Specialist qualified clerking provides direct input intothe strategy of chambers. Paul is Chartered Instituteof Marketing (CIM) qualified and is one of only a smallnumber of clerks to have achieved the Level 5 Diplomain Leadership and Management with the Instituteof Leadership and Management (ILM). He is also afounding member of the Russian/CIS ArbitrationNetwork (RCAN) and an ambassador for JUSTICE.Chambers are changing the nature of businessdevelopment and marketing to communicate withclients. Fountain Court have used innovative digitalmarketing, such as videos, to promote niches of work,such as cyber fraud. Digital marketing also enableschambers to expand its reach.They also reviewed their client base and conducteda perceptions survey with firms to develop and refinetheir offering and learn more about clients’ needs. ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin‘’ Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick Webber Fountain CourtNot even the most successful setscan afford to be complacent.The Bar provides a glimpse intothe future of law.Paul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJD Murbeck Law LLPThe chambers model is lean,conflict-free, and cost effective,a QC often costing the same asa senior associate in a law firm.Tim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah GiddensPaul Martenstyn, Fountain Court ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsThey responded to demand from the Magic Circle firms forwhite-collar crime expertise to complement their existingbanking work. And expanded with Richard Lissack QC anda new team of barristers to address this need.Chambers are rethinking the way they seek out talent,focusing on excellence above all, and looking fordiversity. Chambers also focusing on talent retention,such as wellbeing, mental health, and supportingfemale practitioners. They place increased focus tooon growing individual practices, with well-receivedpractice reviews.The futureFuture barristers have a different level of expectationof life at the Bar than previous generations. They wantmoney now, benefits, and travel opportunities. Barristersalso need to be tech savvy and alive to social media suchas LinkedIn and Twitter.Clients’ needs are changing – barristers need to becommercial, provide value for money, 24/7 access,and added extras. Sets need to keep pace with privatepractice, in-house, and international clients to seegrowth. Fountain Court will continue to capitalise onthese changing demands.The modern referral model works very well for thetop end of the Bar, fitting with trends such as the new‘gig economy’. In a world where self-employment isthe future and the only jobs safe from automation arethose which require uniquely human skills, the Bar is aneffective model.The fortunes of areas of the Bar may be very different– some sets will grow larger, others will merge, somewill fold. There will be other competition from in-houseadvocacy units. So not even the most successful sets canafford to be complacent.The traditional firm–chambers dynamic is changing, withreferrals working both ways.The role of the clerk is changing and becomingincreasingly professionalised – the Institute of BarristersClerks (IBC) is lobbying for this, as education takes on anincreasingly important role. What chambers expect fromclerking will change as chambers embrace trends suchas public access and fresh challenges such as ABSs, andincreasingly expect clerks to identify and capitalise onnew opportunities.Prudence BeeverMike Whyatt BriefedOrlagh Kelly ClerksroomStephen WardHarry Hodgkin Forum ChambersDavid McIlroyPatrick Webber Fountain CourtPaul Martenstyn Kohen Rapoport GroupDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJDThere is a movement from barristers marketingthemselves towards barristers marketing chambers,although this is balanced with their independent, selfemployed status.AI will be used in business development although therewill be no substitute for face-to-face interaction. Butas chambers become increasingly international, andthe way in which chambers communicate with lawfirms, clients, and current and future barristers, digitalmarketing will be key. Bar Council Direct Access Portal Murbeck Law LLPTim BeckerPeter Murray Richmond Chambers LLPPaul RichmondSarah Giddensfountaincourt.co.uk ShenSmith BarristersDaniel J ShenSmith 39 EssexDavid Barnes

Absolute BarristerSimon and Katy GittinsKohen Rapoport Group Bar Council Direct Access PortalPrudence BeeverMike WhyattDr Yuri Rapoport BSc SJDFounder, Chairman and Barrister BriefedOrlagh KellyTrailblazing brands freeing up barristers to provide access to justiceInnovationThe Kohen Rapoport Group’s driving force is the belief thateveryone should have access to justice and high qualitylegal services. To make this principle a reality, the groupfrees up legal professionals to focus on the practi

Absolute Barrister was the first company formed to take advantage of the direct access rules and its goal is to continue to drive innovation to allow better access to legal services. Husband and wife team first founded Absolute Barrister under a different name in 2011. Absolute Barrister is an innovative, award-winning online

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