Physical Education/Health Grade 6 -8 Day 1

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Physical Education/Health Grade 6th-8thDay 1StandardsPE: 8-2.3 Identify the five components of health-related physical fitness (musclestrength, muscle endurance, aerobic capacity, flexibility, and body composition)and, with limited teacher assistance, use them to design a personal health-relatedphysical fitness plan based on FITT (frequency, intensity, type, and time) trainingprinciples.LearningTargets/ I canStatementsEssentialQuestionsResourcesI can recall the five components of health related fitness.I can recall and apply the FITT Principle.LearningActivities ofExperiencesHow much do I need to exercise to improve my physical fitness?https://www.spps.org/Page/18206 (page at-you-need-for-great-workouts1231593 (pages 3-6)Read both articles (pages 2-6).Answer the follow questions on a sheet of paper or word document:1. In your own words define each of the 5 health related components of fitness.2. In your own words define the FITT principle.3. Why are the 5 health related components of fitness important to your life?

Articleshttps://www.spps.org/Page/182065 Components of Physical FitnessThe 5 components of physical fitness are often used in our school systems, health clubs and fitnesscenters to gauge how good a shape we are truly in. The 5 components that make up total fitness are: Cardiovascular EnduranceMuscular StrengthMuscular enduranceFlexibilityBody CompositionTotal fitness can be defined by how well the body performs in each one of the components of physicalfitness as a whole. It is not enough to be able to bench press your body weight. You also need todetermine how well you can handle running a mile etc.A closer look at the individual components:Cardiovascular endurance is the ability of the heart and lungs to work together to provide the neededoxygen and fuel to the body during sustained workloads. Examples would be jogging, cycling andswimming. The Cooper Run is used most often to test cardiovascular endurance.Muscular strength is the amount of force a muscle can produce. Examples would be the bench press,leg press or bicep curl. The push up test is most often used to test muscular strength.Muscular endurance is the ability of the muscles to perform continuous without fatiguing. Exampleswould be cycling, step machines and elliptical machines. The sit up test is most often used to testmuscular endurance.Flexibility is the ability of each joint to move through the available range of motion for a specific joint.Examples would be stretching individual muscles or the ability to perform certain functional movementssuch as the lunge. The sit and reach test is most often used to test flexibility.Body composition is the amount of fat mass compared to lean muscle mass, bone and organs. This canbe measured using underwater weighing, Skinfold readings, and bioelectrical impedance. Underwaterweighing is considered the “gold standard” for body fat measurement, however because of the size andexpense of the equipment needed very few places are set up to do this kind of measurement.

Source: -you-need-for-great-workouts-1231593The F.I.T.T. Principle for an EffectiveWorkoutChange these elements to achieve new fitness goalsByPaige WaehnerPaige Waehner is a certified personal trainer, author of the "Guide to Become a PersonalTrainer"; and co-author of "The Buzz on Exercise & Fitness."Reviewed by Heather Black on January 15, 2020Heather Black, CPT is a NASM-certified personal trainer and owner of Heather Black Fitness &Nutrition where she offers remote and in-person training and nutrition coaching.Understanding the F.I.T.T. principle helps you create a workout plan that will be more effectivein reaching your fitness goals. F.I.T.T. stands for frequency, intensity, time, and type ofexercise. These are the four elements you need to think about to create workouts that fit yourgoals and fitness level. Learn how the F.I.T.T. principle works.FrequencyThe first thing to set up with your workout plan is frequency—how often you exercise. Yourfrequency often depends on a variety of factors including the type of workout you're doing, howhard you're working, your fitness level, and your exercise goals.In general, the exercise guidelines set out by the American College of Sports Medicine give youa place to start when figuring out how often to work out: For cardio: Depending on your goal, guidelines recommend moderate exercise five ormore days a week or intense cardio three days a week to improve your health. If you wantto lose weight, you'll want to work up to more frequent workouts, often up to six or moredays a week.For strength training: The recommended frequency is two to three non-consecutivedays a week (at least one to two days between sessions). Your frequency, however, willoften depend on the workouts you're doing, because you want to work your muscles atleast two times a week. If you do a split routine, like upper body one day and lower bodythe next, your workouts will be more frequent than total body workouts.

IntensityIntensity has to do with how hard you work during exercise. How you can change theintensity depends on the type of workout you're doing. For cardio: For cardio, you will usually monitor intensity by heart rate, perceivedexertion, the talk test, a heart rate monitor, or a combination of those measures. Thegeneral recommendation is to work at a moderate intensity for steady-state workouts.Interval training is done at a high intensity for a shorter period of time. It's a good idea tohave a mixture of low, medium, and high-intensity cardio exercises so you stimulatedifferent energy systems and avoid overtraining.For strength training: Monitoring the intensity of strength training involves a differentset of parameters. Your intensity is made up of the exercises you do, the amount ofweight you lift, and the number of reps and sets you do. The intensity can change basedon your goals. If you are a beginner looking to build muscle stability and endurance, usea lighter weight and do fewer sets with high repetitions: two or three sets of 12 to 20 reps.If your goal is to grow muscle, do a higher number of sets with a moderate amount ofrepetitions (for instance, four sets of 10 to 12 reps each). If you want to build strength,use heavy weights to do a more sets with fewer reps (five sets of three reps each, forexample).TimeThe next element of your workout plan is how long you exercise during each session. There isn'tone set rule for how long you should exercise and it will typically depend on your fitness leveland the type of workout you're doing. For cardio: The exercise guidelines suggest 30 to 60 minutes of cardio but the durationof your workout depends on what you're doing. If you're a beginner, you might start witha workout of 15 to 20 minutes. If you're doing steady-state cardio, such as going for a runor getting on a cardio machine, you might exercise for 30 to 60 minutes. If you're doinginterval training and working at a very high intensity, your workout will be shorter,around 20 to 30 minutes. Having a variety of workouts of different intensities anddurations will give you a solid, balanced cardio program.For strength training: How long you lift weights depends on the type of workout you'redoing and your schedule. For example, a total body workout could take up to an hour,whereas a split routine could take less time because you're working fewer muscle groups.

TypeThe type of exercise you do is the last part of the F.I.T.T. principle and an easy one tomanipulate to avoid overuse injuries or weight loss plateaus. For cardio exercise: Cardio is easy to change, since any activity that gets your heart rateup counts. Running, walking, cycling, dancing, and the elliptical trainer are some of thewide variety of activities you can choose. Having more than one go-to cardio activity isthe best way to reduce boredom, and your body needs variability along with progressiveoverload.For strength training: Strength training workouts can also offer variety. They includeany exercise where you're using some type of resistance (bands, dumbbells, machines,etc.) to work your muscles. Bodyweight exercises can also be considered a form ofstrength training. You can easily change the type of strength workouts you do, from totalbody training to adding things like supersets or pyramid training to liven things up.How to Use the F.I.T.T Principle in Your WorkoutsThe F.I.T.T. principle outlines how to manipulate your program to get in shape and get betterresults. It also helps you figure out how to change your workouts to avoid boredom, overuseinjuries, and weight loss plateaus.For example, walking three times a week for 30 minutes at a moderate pace might be a greatplace for a beginner to start. After a few weeks, however, your body adapts to these workoutsand several things may happen: Your body becomes more efficient at exercise: The more you workout, the easier it isto do the exercises, causing you to burn fewer calories than you did when you started.Weight loss: Your new workouts may lead to weight loss. When you weigh less, youexpend fewer calories moving your now-smaller body around.Boredom: Doing the same workout for weeks or months on end can get old, eating intoyour motivation to exercise.It's at this point you want to manipulate one or more of the F.I.T.T. principles, such as: Changing the frequency by adding another day of walkingChanging the intensity by walking faster or adding some running intervalsChanging the time spent walking each workout dayChanging the type of workout by swimming, cycling, or running.Even just changing one of these elements can make a big difference in your workout and in howyour body responds to exercise. It's important to change things up on a regular basis to keep yourbody healthy and your mind engaged.

Article SourcesVerywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the factswithin our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keepour content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.1. Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR, et al. American College of Sports Medicineposition stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintainingcardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults:guidance for prescribing exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. b

Physical Education/Health Grade 6th-8thDay 2StandardsLearningTargets/ I tivities ofExperiencesAttachment:PE: 8-2.3 Identify the five components of health-related physical fitness (musclestrength, muscle endurance, aerobic capacity, flexibility, and body composition)and, with limited teacher assistance, use them to design a personal health-relatedphysical fitness plan based on FITT (frequency, intensity, type, and time) trainingprinciples.Health: N-8.6.2 Develop and implement a plan to increase physical activity.I can recall and apply the health related fitness.I can recall and apply the FITT Principle.How much do I need to exercise to improve my physical fitness?https://www.spps.org/Page/18206 (page at-you-need-for-great-workouts1231593 (pages 3-6)On a sheet of paper or word document use the FITT Principle Chart to create aworkout plan for the next 7 days. Complete the workout so that you will improveon 3 different components of fitness.

Articleshttps://www.spps.org/Page/182065 Components of Physical FitnessThe 5 components of physical fitness are often used in our school systems, health clubs and fitnesscenters to gauge how good a shape we are truly in. The 5 components that make up total fitness are: Cardiovascular EnduranceMuscular StrengthMuscular enduranceFlexibilityBody CompositionTotal fitness can be defined by how well the body performs in each one of the components of physicalfitness as a whole. It is not enough to be able to bench press your body weight. You also need todetermine how well you can handle running a mile etc.A closer look at the individual components:Cardiovascular endurance is the ability of the heart and lungs to work together to provide the neededoxygen and fuel to the body during sustained workloads. Examples would be jogging, cycling andswimming. The Cooper Run is used most often to test cardiovascular endurance.Muscular strength is the amount of force a muscle can produce. Examples would be the bench press,leg press or bicep curl. The push up test is most often used to test muscular strength.Muscular endurance is the ability of the muscles to perform continuous without fatiguing. Exampleswould be cycling, step machines and elliptical machines. The sit up test is most often used to testmuscular endurance.Flexibility is the ability of each joint to move through the available range of motion for a specific joint.Examples would be stretching individual muscles or the ability to perform certain functional movementssuch as the lunge. The sit and reach test is most often used to test flexibility.Body composition is the amount of fat mass compared to lean muscle mass, bone and organs. This canbe measured using underwater weighing, Skinfold readings, and bioelectrical impedance. Underwaterweighing is considered the “gold standard” for body fat measurement, however because of the size andexpense of the equipment needed very few places are set up to do this kind of measurement.

Source: -you-need-for-great-workouts-1231593The F.I.T.T. Principle for an EffectiveWorkoutChange these elements to achieve new fitness goalsByPaige WaehnerPaige Waehner is a certified personal trainer, author of the "Guide to Become a PersonalTrainer"; and co-author of "The Buzz on Exercise & Fitness."Reviewed by Heather Black on January 15, 2020Heather Black, CPT is a NASM-certified personal trainer and owner of Heather Black Fitness &Nutrition where she offers remote and in-person training and nutrition coaching.Understanding the F.I.T.T. principle helps you create a workout plan that will be more effectivein reaching your fitness goals. F.I.T.T. stands for frequency, intensity, time, and type ofexercise. These are the four elements you need to think about to create workouts that fit yourgoals and fitness level. Learn how the F.I.T.T. principle works.FrequencyThe first thing to set up with your workout plan is frequency—how often you exercise. Yourfrequency often depends on a variety of factors including the type of workout you're doing, howhard you're working, your fitness level, and your exercise goals.In general, the exercise guidelines set out by the American College of Sports Medicine give youa place to start when figuring out how often to work out: For cardio: Depending on your goal, guidelines recommend moderate exercise five ormore days a week or intense cardio three days a week to improve your health. If you wantto lose weight, you'll want to work up to more frequent workouts, often up to six or moredays a week.For strength training: The recommended frequency is two to three non-consecutivedays a week (at least one to two days between sessions). Your frequency, however, willoften depend on the workouts you're doing, because you want to work your muscles atleast two times a week. If you do a split routine, like upper body one day and lower bodythe next, your workouts will be more frequent than total body workouts.

IntensityIntensity has to do with how hard you work during exercise. How you can change theintensity depends on the type of workout you're doing. For cardio: For cardio, you will usually monitor intensity by heart rate, perceivedexertion, the talk test, a heart rate monitor, or a combination of those measures. Thegeneral recommendation is to work at a moderate intensity for steady-state workouts.Interval training is done at a high intensity for a shorter period of time. It's a good idea tohave a mixture of low, medium, and high-intensity cardio exercises so you stimulatedifferent energy systems and avoid overtraining.For strength training: Monitoring the intensity of strength training involves a differentset of parameters. Your intensity is made up of the exercises you do, the amount ofweight you lift, and the number of reps and sets you do. The intensity can change basedon your goals. If you are a beginner looking to build muscle stability and endurance, usea lighter weight and do fewer sets with high repetitions: two or three sets of 12 to 20 reps.If your goal is to grow muscle, do a higher number of sets with a moderate amount ofrepetitions (for instance, four sets of 10 to 12 reps each). If you want to build strength,use heavy weights to do a more sets with fewer reps (five sets of three reps each, forexample).TimeThe next element of your workout plan is how long you exercise during each session. There isn'tone set rule for how long you should exercise and it will typically depend on your fitness leveland the type of workout you're doing. For cardio: The exercise guidelines suggest 30 to 60 minutes of cardio but the durationof your workout depends on what you're doing. If you're a beginner, you might start witha workout of 15 to 20 minutes. If you're doing steady-state cardio, such as going for a runor getting on a cardio machine, you might exercise for 30 to 60 minutes. If you're doinginterval training and working at a very high intensity, your workout will be shorter,around 20 to 30 minutes. Having a variety of workouts of different intensities anddurations will give you a solid, balanced cardio program.For strength training: How long you lift weights depends on the type of workout you'redoing and your schedule. For example, a total body workout could take up to an hour,whereas a split routine could take less time because you're working fewer muscle groups.

TypeThe type of exercise you do is the last part of the F.I.T.T. principle and an easy one tomanipulate to avoid overuse injuries or weight loss plateaus. For cardio exercise: Cardio is easy to change, since any activity that gets your heart rateup counts. Running, walking, cycling, dancing, and the elliptical trainer are some of thewide variety of activities you can choose. Having more than one go-to cardio activity isthe best way to reduce boredom, and your body needs variability along with progressiveoverload.For strength training: Strength training workouts can also offer variety. They includeany exercise where you're using some type of resistance (bands, dumbbells, machines,etc.) to work your muscles. Bodyweight exercises can also be considered a form ofstrength training. You can easily change the type of strength workouts you do, from totalbody training to adding things like supersets or pyramid training to liven things up.How to Use the F.I.T.T Principle in Your WorkoutsThe F.I.T.T. principle outlines how to manipulate your program to get in shape and get betterresults. It also helps you figure out how to change your workouts to avoid boredom, overuseinjuries, and weight loss plateaus.For example, walking three times a week for 30 minutes at a moderate pace might be a greatplace for a beginner to start. After a few weeks, however, your body adapts to these workoutsand several things may happen: Your body becomes more efficient at exercise: The more you workout, the easier it isto do the exercises, causing you to burn fewer calories than you did when you started.Weight loss: Your new workouts may lead to weight loss. When you weigh less, youexpend fewer calories moving your now-smaller body around.Boredom: Doing the same workout for weeks or months on end can get old, eating intoyour motivation to exercise.It's at this point you want to manipulate one or more of the F.I.T.T. principles, such as: Changing the frequency by adding another day of walkingChanging the intensity by walking faster or adding some running intervalsChanging the time spent walking each workout dayChanging the type of workout by swimming, cycling, or running.Even just changing one of these elements can make a big difference in your workout and in howyour body responds to exercise. It's important to change things up on a regular basis to keep yourbody healthy and your mind engaged.

Article SourcesVerywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the factswithin our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keepour content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.1. Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR, et al. American College of Sports Medicineposition stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintainingcardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults:guidance for prescribing exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. b

Physical Education/Health 6th-8thDay 3StandardsLearningTargets/ I tivities ofExperiencesPE: 8-2.3 Identify the five components of health-related physical fitness (musclestrength, muscle endurance, aerobic capacity, flexibility, and body composition)and, with limited teacher assistance, use them to design a personal health-relatedphysical fitness plan based on FITT (frequency, intensity, type, and time) trainingprinciples.Health: N-8.6.2 Develop and implement a plan to increase physical activity.I can recall and apply the health related fitness.I can recall and apply the FITT Principle.I can demonstrate different exercises.How much do I need to exercise to improve my physical fitness?https://www.spps.org/Page/18206 (page at-you-need-for-great-workouts1231593 (pages 3-6)Complete 1 day of the workout you created.Write a one page reflection on how the workout went. Did you do enough exerciseto improve your fitness? Why or why not? How will exercise enhance your lifestyle?

Articleshttps://www.spps.org/Page/182065 Components of Physical FitnessThe 5 components of physical fitness are often used in our school systems, health clubs and fitness centers togauge how good a shape we are truly in. The 5 components that make up total fitness are: Cardiovascular EnduranceMuscular StrengthMuscular enduranceFlexibilityBody CompositionTotal fitness can be defined by how well the body performs in each one of the components of physical fitness as awhole. It is not enough to be able to bench press your body weight. You also need to determine how well you canhandle running a mile etc.A closer look at the individual components:Cardiovascular endurance is the ability of the heart and lungs to work together to provide the needed oxygen andfuel to the body during sustained workloads. Examples would be jogging, cycling and swimming. The Cooper Runis used most often to test cardiovascular endurance.Muscular strength is the amount of force a muscle can produce. Examples would be the bench press, leg press orbicep curl. The push up test is most often used to test muscular strength.Muscular endurance is the ability of the muscles to perform continuous without fatiguing. Examples would becycling, step machines and elliptical machines. The sit up test is most often used to test muscular endurance.Flexibility is the ability of each joint to move through the available range of motion for a specific joint. Exampleswould be stretching individual muscles or the ability to perform certain functional movements such as the lunge.The sit and reach test is most often used to test flexibility.Body composition is the amount of fat mass compared to lean muscle mass, bone and organs. This can bemeasured using underwater weighing, Skinfold readings, and bioelectrical impedance. Underwater weighing isconsidered the “gold standard” for body fat measurement, however because of the size and expense of theequipment needed very few places are set up to do this kind of measurement.

Source: -you-need-for-great-workouts-1231593The F.I.T.T. Principle for an Effective WorkoutChange these elements to achieve new fitness goalsByPaige WaehnerPaige Waehner is a certified personal trainer, author of the "Guide to Become a Personal Trainer"; and coauthor of "The Buzz on Exercise & Fitness."Reviewed by Heather Black on January 15, 2020Heather Black, CPT is a NASM-certified personal trainer and owner of Heather Black Fitness & Nutritionwhere she offers remote and in-person training and nutrition coaching.Understanding the F.I.T.T. principle helps you create a workout plan that will be more effective inreaching your fitness goals. F.I.T.T. stands for frequency, intensity, time, and type of exercise. These arethe four elements you need to think about to create workouts that fit your goals and fitness level. Learnhow the F.I.T.T. principle works.FrequencyThe first thing to set up with your workout plan is frequency—how often you exercise. Your frequencyoften depends on a variety of factors including the type of workout you're doing, how hard you'reworking, your fitness level, and your exercise goals.In general, the exercise guidelines set out by the American College of Sports Medicine give you a place tostart when figuring out how often to work out: For cardio: Depending on your goal, guidelines recommend moderate exercise five or more daysa week or intense cardio three days a week to improve your health. If you want to lose weight,you'll want to work up to more frequent workouts, often up to six or more days a week.For strength training: The recommended frequency is two to three non-consecutive days a week(at least one to two days between sessions). Your frequency, however, will often depend on theworkouts you're doing, because you want to work your muscles at least two times a week. If youdo a split routine, like upper body one day and lower body the next, your workouts will be morefrequent than total body workouts.

IntensityIntensity has to do with how hard you work during exercise. How you can change the intensity dependson the type of workout you're doing. For cardio: For cardio, you will usually monitor intensity by heart rate, perceived exertion, thetalk test, a heart rate monitor, or a combination of those measures. The general recommendation isto work at a moderate intensity for steady-state workouts. Interval training is done at a highintensity for a shorter period of time. It's a good idea to have a mixture of low, medium, and highintensity cardio exercises so you stimulate different energy systems and avoid overtraining.For strength training: Monitoring the intensity of strength training involves a different set ofparameters. Your intensity is made up of the exercises you do, the amount of weight you lift, andthe number of reps and sets you do. The intensity can change based on your goals. If you are abeginner looking to build muscle stability and endurance, use a lighter weight and do fewer setswith high repetitions: two or three sets of 12 to 20 reps. If your goal is to grow muscle, do a highernumber of sets with a moderate amount of repetitions (for instance, four sets of 10 to 12 repseach). If you want to build strength, use heavy weights to do a more sets with fewer reps (five setsof three reps each, for example).TimeThe next element of your workout plan is how long you exercise during each session. There isn't one setrule for how long you should exercise and it will typically depend on your fitness level and the type ofworkout you're doing. For cardio: The exercise guidelines suggest 30 to 60 minutes of cardio but the duration of yourworkout depends on what you're doing. If you're a beginner, you might start with a workout of 15to 20 minutes. If you're doing steady-state cardio, such as going for a run or getting on a cardiomachine, you might exercise for 30 to 60 minutes. If you're doing interval training and working ata very high intensity, your workout will be shorter, around 20 to 30 minutes. Having a variety ofworkouts of different intensities and durations will give you a solid, balanced cardio program.For strength training: How long you lift weights depends on the type of workout you're doingand your schedule. For example, a total body workout could take up to an hour, whereas a splitroutine could take less time because you're working fewer muscle groups.

TypeThe type of exercise you do is the last part of the F.I.T.T. principle and an easy one to manipulate to avoidoveruse injuries or weight loss plateaus. For cardio exercise: Cardio is easy to change, since any activity that gets your heart rate upcounts. Running, walking, cycling, dancing, and the elliptical trainer are some of the wide varietyof activities you can choose. Having more than one go-to cardio activity is the best way to reduceboredom, and your body needs variability along with progressive overload.For strength training: Strength training workouts can also offer variety. They includeany exercise where you're using some type of resistance (bands, dumbbells, machines, etc.) towork your muscles. Bodyweight exercises can also be considered a form of strength training. Youcan easily change the type of strength workouts you do, from total body training to adding thingslike supersets or pyramid training to liven things up.How to Use the F.I.T.T Principle in Your WorkoutsThe F.I.T.T. principle outlines how to manipulate your program to get in shape and get better results. Italso helps you figure out how to change your workouts to avoid boredom, overuse injuries, and weightloss plateaus.For example, walking three times a week for 30 minutes at a moderate pace might be a great place for abeginner to start. After a few weeks, however, your body adapts to these workouts and se

For cardio: The exercise guidelines suggest 30 to 60 minutes of cardio but the duration of your workout depends on what you're doing. If you're a beginner, you might start with a workout of 15 to 20 minutes. If you're doing steady-state cardio, such as going for a run or getting on a cardio machine, you might exercise for 30 to 60 minutes.

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