Technology Evaluation Of Robotics Technology In Power Industry

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2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationTechnology Evaluation ofRobotics Technology in PowerIndustryByung Sung Yoon,Judith Estep,Terry Oliver,Robert Grizzi,John Lindberg T.,Portland State UniversityBonneville Power AdministrationBonneville Power AdministrationElectric Power Research InstituteElectric Power Research InstituteAbstractThe electric power utilities as important social infrastructures should beoperated stably without any failure in supply of electricity. For stableoperation, it is necessary to input huge amount of resource and investmentthroughout power generation, transmission and distribution facilities.Particularly, constant inspection and maintenance of the facilities requireshighly skilled manpower and advanced technologies. In spite of endlessefforts, the electric power industry is facing serious challenges from social,economic and environmental problems. In this regard, a number of roboticsystems have been tested and applied for inspection and maintenance innuclear power plants and high voltage power transmission lines. The ElectricPower Research Institute (EPRI) which conducts research, development anddemonstration (RD&D) relating to the generation, delivery and use ofelectricity for the benefit of the public has also required efficient technologymanagement in providing a blue print of robotics technologies in electricpower sector for the future. The organization wants to centralize the R&Dcapability of robotics technologies which are dispersed by each division inorder to prevent duplicated investments and manage its R&D capabilityeffectively. This research is a step towards assessing the current roboticstechnology being used in the power industry and identifying the technologiesthat would benefit the industry most by using the Technology DevelopmentEnvelop (TDE) approach.23055

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationProject OverviewProject Background‐ Electric Power Research Institute(EPRI) wants to centralize the R&Dcapability of robotics technologies which are dispersed by eachdivision‐ To prevent duplicated investments and manage its R&D capabilityeffectivelyProject Objective‐ To evaluate the current robotics technologies and identify the futuredevelopment strategy in power industry with the TechnologyDevelopment Envelope (TDE) methodology3Introduction of TDE “ to link technology to organization strategy so that managers canunderstand where technologies fit into their organization strategy andwhere the technologies are going in the future.” Formed by connectingtechnologies that have thehighest technology value ineach period throughoutthe specified timeframe43056

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationSix Steps for Formation of TDEStep 1: Develop a forecasting model using Delphi for identifying the trend ofemerging technologies.Step 2: Identify criteria and technologicalfactors satisfying a company’sobjective.Step 3: Assess the technologicalcharacteristics of each emergingtechnology along the factors.Step 4: Develop a hierarchical model anddetermine the relative desirability ofmeasures of effectiveness on thecompany’s objective.Step 5: Evaluate the value of emergingtechnologies on the company’sobjective.Step 6: Construct the TDE and technologydevelopment paths.5Project Timeline1st half of 2016 Sensitivity Analysis &Documentation10/31 Kickoff MeetingPh1Ph2Technology Factor Evaluation2014 201511/30 Model Verification09/30 Model Quantification1st Q2nd Q3rd QDevelopmentof TDE2015 20164th Q07/30 Model Validation04/15 Forming Expert Panels02/15 Model Development01/08 1st Monthly Meeting01/01 Official Start63057

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationExpert IdentificationBibliographic Database Data file s Pre‐processing CSVBibTexRefworksISI with Sci2 & MS Excel1st Analysis ReportPost‐processing Main keywords in CARPI2010‐2014- Co‐AuthorshipCo‐OccurrenceFrequency -Main usages of RoboticTech. (RT)Features and functionsChallengesProactive PeopleMain Reference SourceSocial Network AnalysisWith Gephi-JournalsOther conferencesBooks 77Keyword Analysis – Social Network AnalysisAuthor KeywordsIEEE Keywords Similar results with frequency analysis Actively researched application of robotic technology in power industry Inspection & Maintenance for power transmission line Main featuresSensor & Vision, Telerobotics (Remote handling, Teleroperation),Mobile robotsINSPEC ControlledKeywordsINSPEC UncontrolledKeywords83058

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationCo‐Authorship AnalysisIREQ,CanadaETH Zurich,Switzerland Most active player in CAPRI 2010-2012- Gilles Caprari (ETH Zürich, Switzerland) Most of top rankers belong to Switzerland & Canada Rare co-authorship between each country except EUcountries9Robotic Maintenance ‐ Out of US in Robotics JournalsItalyUniv. of PISA &Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna (SSSA)Japan ‐ AISTCanadaUniv. of Quebec &IREQFrance CEA List (Atomic Energyand Alternative EnergiesCommission) & AREVAJapanAIST & Univ. of TsukubaJapanOsaka Univ. & YokogawaElect Corp.103059

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationRobotic Inspection‐US in Robotics JournalsChris UrmsonCMU ‐ Navigation & autonomoussystemCanadaUniv. of Quebec &IREQDieter FoxCEA List (Atomic Energyand Alternative EnergiesCommission) & AREVAGaurav S. SukhatmeUSC – Large scale & distributedrobotic system11Example of Individual Expert InformationAffiliation, Brief Bio, Co-Authorship Network,Research Topic Network123060

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationPotential Hierarchical Decision Model (HDM)13Model Metrics143061

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationAssignment of Experts on Items of HDM15Result of ValidationDropped a perspective and five criteria which are not reached onthe acceptable criterion163062

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationNew Validated Model17Model Quantification183063

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationModel Quantification – Global WeightsPerspectives(F1) Multi‐Function0.30 (F2) Multi‐Environment(F3) Multi‐Applications(D1) Heavy‐Duty(D2) Moving Flexibility(P2) Design0.20 (D3) Size(D4) Contamination Proof(D5) Nondestructive(T1) Global Positioning(P3) Technological0.15 (T2) High Precision(T3) Real‐time Assessment(U1) Easy to Use(U2) Upgradable(P4) User Experience 0.22(U3) Maintainable(U4) Safe and Fast(E1) Remotely/Wireless(E2) Visual Capability(E3) Dual Communication(E4) Data Processing(P5) Electronics0.13(E5) Interference Proof ‐Radiation(E6) Interference Proof –Electromagnetic Field(P1) iaTo get Technology Value, eachGlobal Weight will bemultiplied by the DesirabilityScore of each TechnologyAlternative.19Description of Desirability Curve A desirability curve presents the preference on the technological metric ofeach factor. (Gerdsri, 2007) Development of a desirability curve*‐ Step 1: Identify the best and worst desirable limiting metrics that eachfactor can take on.‐ Step 2: Verify the measures of effectiveness whose desirability valueis linearly proportional to their numerical value between the twolimits.‐ Step 3: Develop a semi‐absolute scale by assigning 0 point to theworst and 100 points to the best desirable limiting metrics under eachfactor.‐ Step 4: Calculate the relative desirability of the intermediate valuesbetween the two limits.‐ Step 5: The relative desirability values of metrics under each factorcan be graphically presented as a desirability curve by arranging therange of metrics value on the horizontal axis (X‐ axis) and thedesirability value on the vertical axis (Y‐axis).Source:Gerdsri, N. (2010), “Strategic evaluation of technology”, in Daim, T., Gerdsri, N. and Basoglu, N.(Eds.),Technology Assessment: Forecasting Future Adoption of Emerging Technologies, ErichSchmidt Verlag GmbH & Co., Berlin, Germany.203064

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationDesirability Curves21Calculation of Technology ValueRobotic SystemsPerspectivesSubmersible Mini-RobotDesirabilityGlobalValuesWeight Tech MetricsCriteriaMulti-Functions0.060.10 1 (Underwater)Functionality g FlexibilityCompactContamination ProofNondestructiveGlobal PositioningTechnological High PrecisionReal-Time AssessmentDesignUserExperienceElectronics2 (Locomotive-ability,imaging)Transmission Line RobotTechDesirability TechValues Tech MetricsValuesValues1006.003 (Locomotive-ability,imaging, sensing)1006.001009.901 (On the 2.860.720.842.860.101.630.142 0.030.060.063 (4-5 DOF)3 (Small)0* ( 0.5hr)0 (No function)- (Unavailable)4 (95-99%)0 05.700.00Easy to Use0.08 4 (one-time elessVisual CapabilityDual Communications0.030.030.080.030.020.030 (Impossible)4 ( 6 hrs)- (Unavailable)1 ( x00 ft.)0* (VGA)0 ( 1 MSPS)100501010050Data Processing0.02 -Interface Proof00.03 0 ( 2.7 μSv/h avg )Tech Level02 (Inspection,Monitoring)4 (MTBF 2.0-2.5yr)2 (3-4 DOF)2 (Medium)5 ( 3.0hr)0 (No function)4 (0-2.5m)4 (95-99%)5 (Spontaneous)6.94 3 (few training required)2.861.430.842.860.100.003 ( 12 hrs))- (Unavailable)5 ( 10 miles)0* (VGA)1 (1 to 40 MSPS)2 (500Mb/sec to 10.00Gb/sec)0.00 56.42200.3100.0065.92223065

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationCalculation of Technology ity Multi-EnvironmentsRobotic SystemsConcrete Crawler RobotSnake RobotDesirability TechDesirability TechGlobalValuesValues Tech MetricsValuesValuesWeight Tech Metrics4 (Locomotive-ability,2 (Locomotive-ability,1006.001006.000.06 crawling, sensing,imaging)imaging)4 (Underground, tightor narrow pipes, high1009.9000.000.10 1 (high reach areas)reach areas, variety ofterrains)Multi-AppicationsHeavy-DutyMoving FlexibilityDesignCompactContamination ProofNondestructiveGlobal PositioningTechnological High PrecisionReal-Time AssessmentUserExperienceElectronics3 (Inspection,0.14 Monitoring,Maintenance)0.03 3 (MTBF 1.5-2.0yr)0.06 1 (2-3 DOF)0.04 2 (Medium)0.03 5 ( 3.0hr)0.04 ?0.03 ?0.06 4 (95-99%)0.06 5 (Spontaneous)Easy to Use0.08 3 (few training essVisual CapabilityDual Communications0.030.030.080.030.020.03Data ProcessingInterface ProofTech Level5 (0 - 25%)3 ( 12 hrs)- (Unavailable)2* ( 1 mile)1 (1 to 40 MSPS)2 (500Mb/sec to 10.02Gb/sec)0.03 0 ( 2.7 μSv/h avg )202.822 683.400.000.005.706.453 (MTBF 1.5-2.0yr)5 (Infinite DOF)3 (Small)1 (0.5 - 1.0 hr)0 (No function)?5 (Spontaneous)67025101005502005.60 4 (one-time training)0.000.720.842.860.101.63?4 ( 6 hrs)- (Unavailable)2* ( 1 mile)0 (Analog NTSC)0 ( 1 0000.0000.0050.800.31 0 ( 100Mb/sec)0.00 0 ( 2.7 μSv/h avg )52.2223Conclusions Functionality has been identified as the most importantperspective. Transmission Line Robot was rated as the most valuabletechnology in this case This presentation demonstrated how we can integrate thefollowing concepts Hierarchical Decision ModelingTechnology ValueBibliometric AnalysisSocial Network Analysis243066

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationReferencesDaim, T., Gerdsri, N., Kockan, I. and Kocaoglu, D. (2011), “Technology DevelopmentEnvelope Approach for The Adoption of Future Powertrain Technologies: A Case Studyon Ford Otosan Roadmapping Model”, Journal of Transportation Systems Engineeringand Information Technology, Vol. 11 No. 2, pp. 58–69.Gerdsri, N. (2007), “An Analytical Approach to Building a Technology DevemlopmentEnvelop (TDE) for Roadmapping of Emerging Technologies”, International Journal ofInnovation and Technology Management, Vol. 04 No. 02, pp. 121–135.Gerdsri, N. (2010), “Strategic evaluation of technology”, in Daim, T., Gerdsri, N. andBasoglu, N. (Eds.),Technology Assessment: Forecasting Future Adoption of EmergingTechnologies, Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co., Berlin, Germany.Gerdsri, N. and Kocaoglu, D.F. (2003), “An analytical approach to building a technologydevelopment envelope (TDE) for roadmapping of emerging technologies: a case studyof emerging electronic cooling technologies for computer servers”, PICMET ’03:Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering and TechnologyTechnology Management for Reshaping the World, 2003., pp. 380–389.25Fenwick, D., Daim, T.U. and Gerdsri, N. (2009), “Value Driven Technology Road Mapping(VTRM) process integrating decision making and marketing tools: Case of Internetsecurity technologies”, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier Inc., Vol. 76No. 8, pp. 1055–1077.Kockan, I., Daim, T.U. and Gerdsri, N. (2010), “Roadmapping future powertraintechnologies: a case study of Ford Otosan”, International Journal of Technology, Policyand Management, Vol. 10 No. 1/2, p. 157.Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI State of Robotics—Assessment and ProposedStrategic Program. (2013), .Allan, J.‐F. (2012), “Robotics for distribution power lines: Overview of the last decade”,2012 2nd International Conference on Applied Robotics for the Power Industry (CARPI),IEEE, pp. 96–101.Fenwick, D., Daim, T.U. and Gerdsri, N. (2009), “Value Driven Technology Road Mapping(VTRM) process integrating decision making and marketing tools: Case of Internetsecurity technologies”, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier Inc., Vol. 76No. 8, pp. 1055–1077.263067

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationKockan, I., Daim, T.U. and Gerdsri, N. (2010), “Roadmapping future powertraintechnologies: a case study of Ford Otosan”, International Journal of Technology, Policyand Management, Vol. 10 No. 1/2, p. 157.Park, J.‐Y., Lee, J.‐K., Cho, B.‐H. and Oh, K.‐Y. (2012), “An Inspection Robot for Live‐LineSuspension Insulator Strings in 345‐kV Power Lines”, IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery,Vol. 27 No. 2, pp. 632–639.Parker, L.E. and Draper, J. V. (1998), “Robotics applications in maintenance and repair”,Handbook of Industrial Robotics, p. 1378.Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI State of Robotics—Assessment and ProposedStrategic Program. (2013), .Roman, H.T. (1993), “Robotic applications in PSE&G’s nuclear and fossil power plants”,IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, Vol. 8 No. 3, pp. 584–592.Montambault, S., Beaudry, J., Toussaint, K. and Pouliot, N. (2010), “On the application ofVTOL UAVs to the inspection of power utility assets”, 2010 1st International Conferenceon Applied Robotics for the Power Industry (CARPI 2010), IEEE, pp. 1–7.27Montambault, S. and Pouliot, N. (2014), “Hydro‐Quebec’s Power Line Robotics Program:15 years of development, implementation and partnerships”, Proceedings of the 2014 3rdInternational Conference on Applied Robotics for the Power Industry, IEEE, pp. 1–6.Park, J.‐Y., Lee, J.‐K., Cho, B.‐H. and Oh, K.‐Y. (2012), “An Inspection Robot for Live‐LineSuspension Insulator Strings in 345‐kV Power Lines”, IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery,Vol. 27 No. 2, pp. 632–639.Parker, L.E. and Draper, J. V. (1998), “Robotics applications in maintenance and repair”,Handbook of Industrial Robotics, p. 1378.Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI State of Robotics—Assessment and ProposedStrategic Program. (2013), .Roman, H.T. (1993), “Robotic applications in PSE&G’s nuclear and fossil power plants”,IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, Vol. 8 No. 3, pp. 584–592.Siebert, L.C., Toledo, L.F.R.B., Block, P.A.B., Bahlke, D.B., Roncolatto, R.A. and Cerqueira,D.P. (2014), “A survey of applied robotics for tree pruning near overhead power lines”,Proceedings of the 2014 3rd International Conference on Applied Robotics for the PowerIndustry, IEEE, pp. 1–5.283068

2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social InnovationWu, G., Xiao, H., Xiao, X., Huang, Z. and Li, Y. (2010), “Transmission line inspection robotand deicing robot: Key technologies, prototypes and applications”, 2010 1st InternationalConference on Applied Robotics for the Power Industry (CARPI 2010), IEEE, pp. 1–6.Elizondo, D., Gentile, T., Candia, H. and Bell, G. (2010), “Overview of robotic applicationsfor energized transmission line work — Technologies, field projects and futuredevelopments”, 2010 1st International Conference on Applied Robotics for the PowerIndustry (CARPI 2010), IEEE, pp. 1–7.Iqbal, J., Tahir, A.M. and ul Islam, R. (2012), “Robotics for Nuclear Power Plants —Challenges and future perspectives”, 2012 2nd International Conference on AppliedRobotics for the Power Industry (CARPI), IEEE, pp. 151–156.Kim, S., Jung, S.H., Lee, S.U., Kim, C.H., Shin, H.C., Seo, Y.C., Lee, N.H., et al. (2010),“Application of robotics for the nuclear power plants in Korea”, 2010 1st InternationalConference on Applied Robotics for the Power Industry (CARPI 2010), IEEE, pp. 1–5.Lages, W.F. and de Oliveira, V.M. (2012), “A survey of applied robotics for the powerindustry in Brazil”, 2012 2nd International Conference on Applied Robotics for the PowerIndustry (CARPI), IEEE, pp. 78–82.29Marinceu, D., Murchison, A. and Hatton, C. (2012), “Use of robotic equipment in aCanadian Used Nuclear Fuel Packing Plant”, 2012 2nd International Conference onApplied Robotics for the Power Industry (CARPI), IEEE, pp. 139–144.de Oliveira, J.H.E. and Lages, W.F. (2010), “Robotized inspection of power lines withinfrared vision”, 2010 1st International Conference on Applied Robotics for the PowerIndustry (CARPI 2010), IEEE, pp. 1–6.303069

This research is a step towards assessing the current robotics technology being used in the power industry and identifying the technologies that would benefit the industry most by using the Technology Development . Design Criteria 3065 2016 Proceedings of PICMET '16: Technology Management for Social Innovation. 23 Calculation of Technology .

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