Latin Primer 1 - Exodus Books

1m ago
2 Views
0 Downloads
3.62 MB
20 Pages
Last View : Today
Last Download : n/a
Upload by : Tripp Mcmullen
Transcription

Latin Primer 1Teacher’s Edition

Latin Primer SeriesLatin Primer: Book 1, Martha WilsonLatin Primer 1: Student EditionLatin Primer 1: Teacher’s EditionLatin Primer 1: Flashcard SetLatin Primer 1: Audio Guide CDLatin Primer: Book 2, Martha Wilson (coming soon)Latin Primer 2: Student EditionLatin Primer 2: Teacher’s EditionLatin Primer 2: Flashcard SetLatin Primer 2: Audio Guide CDLatin Primer: Book 3, Martha Wilson (coming soon)Latin Primer 3: Student EditionLatin Primer 3: Teacher’s EditionLatin Primer 3: Flashcard SetLatin Primer 3: Audio Guide CDPublished by Canon PressP.O. Box 8729, Moscow, ID 83843800.488.2034 www.canonpress.comMartha Wilson, Latin Primer Book I Teacher EditionCopyright 1992 by Martha Wilson.Copyright 2009 by Canon Press.First Edition 1992, Second Edition 2001, Third Edition 2009Cover design by Rachel Hoffmann.Interior layout and design by Phaedrus Media.Textual additions, edits, and quizzes by Laura Storm.Printed in the United States of America.All rights reserved. No part of this publication may bereproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted inany form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy,recording, or otherwise, without prior permis sion of theauthor, except as provided by USA copyright law.09 10 11 12 13 14 1510 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1The owner of this book is permitted to duplicate thestudent Weekly Quizzes and Unit Tests found in this bookfor his/her own classroom use.For printable PDFs of the student Weekly Quizzes and UnitTests found in this book, go to:www.canonpress.com/latinprimerLibrary of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataWilson, Martha.Latin primer. Book I : teacher’s text / Martha Wilson ; editedBy Laura Storm. -- 3rd ed.p. cm.ISBN-13: 978-1-59128-055-2ISBN-10: 1-59128-055-91. Latin language--Grammar--Problems, exercises, etc I.Storm, Laura, 1981- II. Title.PA2087.5.W4935 2008478.2’421--dc222008036590

canonpressMoscow, Idaho

L atin Primer Book 1ContentsIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viPronunciation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viiHow to Use This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ixLatin Grammar Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiiUnit 1: Weeks 1–72Week 1: First conjugation, amō . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4Week 2: Irregular verb, sum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Week 3: Present verb endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23Week 4: Future verb endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32Week 5: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44Week 6: Imperfect verb endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54Week 7: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64Unit 1 Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76Unit 2: Weeks 8–14Week 8: Second conjugation, videō . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86Week 9: Irregular verb, possum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96Week 10: First declension noun endings / Genitive noun endings . . . . . . . . 105Week 11: Second declension noun endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116Week 12: Perfect verb endings / Translating with nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125Week 13: Future perfect verb endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138Week 14: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147Unit 2 Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160iv84

Teacher EditionUnit 3: Weeks 15–21168Week 15: Pluperfect verb endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170Week 16: Present passive verb endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181Week 17: Future passive verb endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191Week 18: Imperfect passive verb endings / Translating with adverbs . . . . . . 200Week 19: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208Week 20: Second declension neuter noun endings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217Week 21: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229Unit 3 Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242Unit 4: Weeks 22–27250Week 22: Demonstrative Pronoun / Translating with adjectives . . . . . . . . . 252Week 23: Demonstrative Pronoun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262Week 24: Personal pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271Week 25: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282Week 26: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291Week 27: Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299Unit 4 Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308Appendices316Contemporary Latin References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317Chant Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333Sources and Helps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341v

L atin Primer Book 1IntroductionYou are about to begin learning a language that most children your age do not learn. It is usuallysurprising to people when they hear that third-graders are learning Latin. Like most of the people youknow, I didn’t learn Latin in third grade. I began studying it after I had graduated from college and wasteaching school.Let me tell you a little about what you can expect. One of the first things you will learn is alittle saying that begins amō, amās, amat. When I was just beginning to teach Latin and told mygrandmother what I was doing, she said “Oh—amō, amās, amat.” She had learned that when she wasabout fifteen, and this was almost eighty years later and she still remembered it! You will learn a lot oflittle sayings like that and if you learn them well they will help you greatly as you learn Latin. Maybeyou’ll be able to tell them to your grandchildren!One thing that may seem funny is that nobody grows up speaking Latin any more and there is nocountry in the world where the people speak Latin. If you want to hear English being spoken, you cango to the United States or England; if you want to hear Spanish being spoken, you can go to Spain orMexico; if you want to hear French you can go to France. But there isn’t a country like that for Latin.The people that spoke Latin were the Romans, and the Roman Empire has been gone for a long time.You might wonder why you are learning Latin if that is so. There are a lot of reasons. I will tell you just afew.I think that all of you have used these words: animal, library, elevator, commercial, and scribble. Yourparents may have used these words: constellation, coronation, and impecunious. All those words andmany, many more come from Latin words. In fact, over half of the words in English come from Latin.So, while you are learning Latin, you will also be learning English. Once you have studied Latin for awhile, you will probably be better at learning and remembering hard English words like impecuniousand constellation and coronation.Someday you might want to learn Spanish or French or Italian. That will probably be easy for youbecause those languages are what became of Latin in different places after the Roman Empire fellapart. Sometimes I call those languages “New Latin” because that’s what they are, in a way.Let me give you another reason. I think Latin will make you smarter! I had gone to school for manyyears when I began learning Latin, and I had never had to learn as carefully for a school subject. Thatis one of the reasons I wish that I had learned Latin at your age. I might have become smarter muchfaster!Here is one last reason. You might find that Latin is fun. As you learn , it will take some hard workand you will enjoy it in different ways as you get better and better. But I like Latin, and I hope you will,too!viValete,Martha Wilson

Teacher EditionPronunciation GuideWhen approaching Latin for the first time, many teachers are concerned that they pronouncethe words correctly. Due to a great variety of schools of thought on Latin pronunciation (classical,ecclesiastic, Italian, English, and any hybrid thereof), we would advise a teacher not to worry, but tosimply choose a pronunciation and stick with it. Spoken Latin has been dead so long that no one canbe sure what a “proper” pronunciation would sound like, and there is no point in straining at gnats (ormacrons). In this book, classical pronunciation is used.Vowels:Vowels in Latin have only two pronunciations, long and short. When speaking, long vowels are heldtwice as long as short vowels. Long vowels are marked with a “macron” or line over the vowel (e.g., ā).Vowels without a macron are short vowels.When spelling a word, including the macron is important in order to determine the meaning of theword. (e.g., liber is a noun meaning book, and līber is an adjective meaning free.)Long Vowels:Short Vowels:ālike a in father: frāter, suprāalike a in idea: canis, mareēlike e in obey: trēs, rēgīnaelike e in bet: et, terraīlike i in machine: mīles, vītailike i in this: hic, silvaōlike o in holy: sōl, glōriaolike o in domain: bonus, nomenūlike oo in rude: flūmen, lūdusulike u in put: sum, subDiphthongs:A combination of two vowel sounds collapsed together into one syllable is a diphthong:ae like ai in aisle caelum, saepeau like ou in house laudo, nautaei like ei in reign deindeeu like eew in eulogy Deusoe like oi in oil moenia, poenaui like ew in chewy huius, hui(Continued on the next page)vii

L atin Primer Book 1Consonants:Latin consonants are pronounced with the same sounds as English consonants with the followingexceptions:cgvschriviiilike c in comelike g in golike w in wowlike s in sissylike ch in chorusis trilledlike y in yesnever soft like city, cinema, or peacenever soft like gem, geology, or gentlenever like Vikings, victor, or vacationnever like easel, weasel, or peasnever like church, chapel, or childrenlike a dog snarling, or a machine gunwhen used before a vowel at the beginning of a word, betweentwo vowels within a word; however, usually used as a vowel

L atin Primer Book 1Unit One2

Teacher EditionUnit 1: GoalsBy the end of this Unit, students should be able to . . . Chant from memory the amō and sum verb chants Chant from memory the present, future, and imperfect verbending chants Recognize a first conjugation verb Give the meanings for Latin words (e.g., aqua means “water”) Translate simple present tense verbs (e.g., amāmus means “welove”)3

L atin Primer Book 1Unit 1 Overview (Weeks 1–7)Welcome to Unit 1! During the next seven weeks, students will primarily focus on memorizing nounsand learning about verbs and their endings. This Unit begins with a basic verb chant for the wordamō (“I love”), followed in Week 2 by an irregular verb chant for the common word sum (“I am”). In theweeks to follow, students will memorize the verb endings for present, future, and imperfect tensesand learn to conjugate using them. Weeks 5 and 7 are review weeks.Teaching Notes: Week 11. Word List: Introduce the Word List for Week 1, asking students to carefully imitate thepronunciation. You’ll notice that amō is followed by its second principal part, amāre, in parentheses.The second principal part is the word you use to find the verb’s stem (see page xiii). Students will notbe learning the meaning of the second principal parts this year, but they will need to memorize them.Review the new Word List throughout the week on a regular basis.2. Derivatives: Discuss the derivatives for this week’s vocabulary (listed below). An explanation ofderivatives appears on pages ix–x, in the “How to Use This Book” section.1. caput, head: cap, captain, chapter, capital, cape (both the garment and the land formation).2. et, and: etc.3. amō, I love: amateur, amorousHave the students write this week’s derivatives in their Weekly Journal on page 161 of the theirstudent book.2. Chant: This week, you’ll be introducing the first conjugation or “ā” family verbs, using the amōchant: amō, amās, amat, amāmus, amātis, amant. Amō is a first conjugation verb. (To review verbbasics, refer to pages xii–xv.)Amō—First Conjugation or “ā” FamilyIn this unit, students will learn to recognize an “ā” family verb by looking at its stem. Begin this weekwith amō. To find the stem of amō, look at its second principal part, listed in parentheses—amāre. Takethe second principal part and remove the -re ending. This will leave you with the verb’s stem; in thiscase, amā-. In this book, this will be the only way the second principal part is used.Now let’s look at the full chant. All verbs in the first conjugation or “ā” family follow the example ofamō when they are conjugated. This is the chant for the present tense of amō. You’ll see two sets ofcolumns: the Latin chant on the left, and its English translation on the right. On the top of the chart,they are identified as either singular or plural, and to the left, whether the verb is in first, second, orthird person.4

Teacher EditionIn the following chant, the stem amā- is in bold. (Remember, in the present tense, the first personsingular is the first principal part, amō. You will not see the stem amōamāmusI lovewe love2ndamāsamātisyou loveyou all love3rdamatamanthe/she/it lovesthey loveRepeat the Latin chant until it becomes comfortable, and quiz the students on the Englishtranslation of each word. Continue to review during the week.3. Quotation: In this week’s quotation, the “c” has a hard sound, and will be pronounced differentlythan it is in English usage. Show students examples of the commonly used abbreviation “etc.” You maywant to discuss why it is incorrect to write “and etc” (redundant).Have the students write this week’s quotation in their Weekly Journal on page 161 of the theirstudent book.4. Worksheet: Follow the directions given and complete the worksheet.5. Quiz: Administer Quiz 1 at the end of the week.* Note that the macron in amā- disappears in both third person forms of the present active. This is an exception to thestem rule; in the conjugation of amō on page xvi, you can see two more exceptions in the present passive. In all the otherlisted forms, the macron remains.5

L atin Primer Book 1Week 1Word List:NOUNSVERBS1. caput. . . . . . . . . . . . . head3. amō (amāre). . . . . . . . I loveCONJUNCTIONS2. et. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . andChant:Amō, I love—Present ActiveFirst Conjugation or “ā” Family amāmusI lovewe love2ndamāsamātisyou loveyou all love3rdamatamanthe/she/it lovesthey love“6”

Teacher EditionWeekly Worksheet 1: Answer KeyA. Write the chant for this week in the box (Latin on the left, English translation on the right). The verbamō is first conjugation or “ā” family. Once you’ve completed the chant, then answer the questions tamōamāmusI lovewe love2ndamāsamātisyou loveyou all love3rdamatamanthe/she/it lovesthey love1. In the sentence, “The rabbit loves carrots,” which word is the subject? rabbit2. Which word is the verb? loves3. Is amō a verb or a noun? verb4. What is the second principal part of amō? amāre5. What is the stem of amō? amā6. In the sentence, “The rabbit loves carrots,” would you use amō, amat, or amātis? amatB. Translate each word on its line. When you translate a word, you give its meaning in English. The one initalics will probably be harder because you’ll need to translate it from English into Latin.1. amōI love2. etand3. headcaputC. Fill in these blanks to answer these questions about derivatives of this week’s words. A derivativeis an English word that comes from Latin. The English word must have a similar spelling and relatedmeaning to the original Latin word.1. The English word amateur comes from the Latin word amō .7

L atin Primer Book 12. An amateur does something because he loves it, rather than for money.D. Fill in the blanks about the quotation you learned this week.1. Etc. is an abbreviation for et cetera which means “and the rest.”2. What is wrong with saying “and etc.”? Since et means “and,” you would be saying “and”twice in a row— “and and the rest.”8

L atin Primer Book 1Week 1 Quizname:A. ChantFill in the missing parts of the chant below, and answer the questions about māshe/she/it loves3rd1. Are these words nouns or verbs?2. Is this a first or second conjugation chant?3. Which family does this word belong to?4. What is the stem of amō (amāre)?B. VocabularyFinish the story using Latin words from this week’s Word List. They are listed below. You will have touse one word twice!amōcaputet1. When Kyle goes to work, he wears a construction hat on his2. For lunch, he brings carrots, a pickle,a peanut buttersandwich.3. When Kyle gets home from work, he sees his wife and children and says,“you!”.jelly

L atin Primer Book 1C. Derivatives1. What is a derivative?2. Write down one of your vocabulary words and one of its derivatives.D. Quotation1. What does et cetera mean?2. How is it often abbreviated?

Teacher EditionWeek 1 Quiz: Answer KeyA. ChantFill in the missing parts of the chant below, and answer the questions about amāmusI lovewe love2ndamāsamātisyou loveyou all love3rdamatamanthe/she/it lovesthey love1. Are these words nouns or verbs? verbs2. Is this a first or second conjugation chant? first conjugation3. Which family does this word belong to? “ā” family4. What is the stem of amō (amāre)? amā-B. VocabularyFinish the story using Latin words from this week’s Word List. They are listed below. You will have touse one word twice!amōcaputet1. When Kyle goes to work, he wears a construction hat on his caput .2. For lunch, he brings carrots, a pickle, et a peanut butter et jelly sandwich.3. When Kyle gets home from work, he sees his wife and children and says, “Amō you!”11

L atin Primer Book 1C. Derivatives1. What is a derivative? A word which has a Latin root.2. Write down one of your vocabulary words and one of its derivatives.Possible options: amō / amateur, amorous; videō / evident, video, vision; caput / captain,chapterD. Quotation1. What does et cetera mean? and the rest2. How is it often abbreviated? etc.12

Latin Primer 1: Teacher's Edition Latin Primer 1: Flashcard Set Latin Primer 1: Audio Guide CD Latin Primer: Book 2, Martha Wilson (coming soon) Latin Primer 2: Student Edition Latin Primer 2: Teacher's Edition Latin Primer 2: Flashcard Set Latin Primer 2: Audio Guide CD Latin Primer: Book 3, Martha Wilson (coming soon) Latin Primer 3 .

Related Documents:

Exodus 19:1-25 Exodus 20:1-21 Exodus 20:22–21:11 Exodus 21:12-36 Exodus 22:1-20 OCTOBER Exodus 22:21–23:9 Exodus 23:10-33 Exodus 24:1-18 Exodus 25:1-22 Exodus 25:23-40 Exodus 26:1-30 Exodus 26:31–27:8 Exodus 27:9–28:5 Exodus 28:6-30 Exodus 28:31-43 Exodus 29:1-21 Exodus 29:22-46 Exodus 30:1-21 Exodus

Jun 26, 2017 · Exodus 15:17 Exodus 15:18 Exodus 15:19 Exodus 15:20–21 Exodus 15:22–23 Exodus 15:24 Exodus 15:25–26 Exodus 15:27 Links to the word-by-word, verse-by-verse studies of Exodus (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) (that is what this document is). This incorporates 2 prev

Week 3 September 22 Exodus 11:1-15:21 Week 4 September 29 Exodus 15:22- 18:27 Week 5 October 6 Exodus 19-24 Week 6 October 13 Exodus 25-27; 30-31 Week 7 October 20 Exodus 28-29 Week 8 October 27 Exodus 32-40 . The Book of Exodus – Exposition – Session 003A

Genesis 24:28-26:35 Genesis 27-29 Genesis 30:1-31:42 Genesis 31:43-34:31 Genesis 35:1-37:24 Genesis 37:25-40:8 Genesis 40:9-42:28 Genesis 42:29-45:15 Genesis 45:16-48:7 Genesis 48:8-50:26; Exodus 1 Exodus 2:1-5:9 Exodus 5:10-8:15 Exodus 8:16-11:10 Exodus 12:1-14:20 Exodus 14:21-17:16 Exodus 18:1-21:21 Exodus 21:22-25

Day 16 - Exodus 19, Exodus 20:1-21, John 1:14-17, Hebrews 8:7-13 Day 17 - Exodus 20:22-26, Exodus 21, Isaiah 44:6, Matthew 22:36-40 Day 18 - Exodus 22, Exodus 23:

the book of Exodus, we are able to see how we can respond in these difficult and joyful times. Contents Week One: Exodus 3:1-10 2 Invitation to a Journey with God Week Two: Exodus 3:7-4:16 4 Saying Yes to God Week Three: Exodus 4:29-5:2, 7:13-24, 8:1-15, 9:13-35, 11:1-10 6 Idolatry: Our Biggest Plague Week Four: Exodus 13:17-22, 14:1-31 9

13. The Heavenly Plan - Ark to the Brazen Altar The Human Practice - Brazen Altar to the Ark 14. Scripture gives at least 5 names to the Tabernacle 1. A Sanctuary - Exodus 25:8 2. Tabernacle - Exodus 25:9 3. Tent - Exodus 26:36 4. Tabernacle of the Congregation - Exodus 29:42 5. Tabernacle of Testimony - Exodus 38:21 15.

40. Exodus 17–18 40. Matthew 21:1–17 Psalm 105 traces the history of Israel from Egypt into the wilderness. 41. Psalm 105 41. Matthew 21:18–32 42. Exodus 19–20 42. Matthew 21:33–46 43 Exodus 21–22:15 43. Matthew 22:1–22 44. Exodus 22:16–23 44. Matthew 22:23–46 45. Exodus 24–25:30 45.

Exodus Chapter 28 4 v. v. 40 Modern Israeli Skull Caps (a photograph) v. v. v. 42 The Priestly Boxer Shorts (a graphic) v. Summary A Set of Summary Doctrines and Commentary Summary Why Exodus 28 is in the Word of God Summary What We Learn from Exodus 28 Summary Jesus Christ in Exodus 28 Summary Garments of

EXODUS 20:1-17 MEMORY VERSE: EXODUS 20:3 PREPARE TO LEAD THE GROUP TIME READ Exodus 19:1–24:18, First Thoughts (p. 64), and Understand the Context (pp. 64–65). Make notes about words and phrases that may require additional explanation during the group Bible study session. STUDY Exodus 20:1

May 18, 2020 – Mr. Burgess The Exodus from Egypt Read: Exodus 15:1-21 Key Verse: Exodus 15:11 As we near the end of the school year, I think we should look back and celebrate what God has

Exodus Study Guide 2 2 LESSON ONE OVERVIEW OF THE BOOK Exodus 1-40 Its Position Exodus is a part of a pentalogy, one of five works which build upon one another.The Pentateuch, penta- (five) teuchos (books) was likely written for the benefit of the second generation to l

have been declared dead for quite some time. All science books were written in Latin and Greek until Seventeenth Century, as a matter of fact first medical text books used at Harvard were written in Latin and Greek. 60-70% of English words are derived from Latin and Greek based words. LATIN ROOTS Latin Root Meaning Examples 1. cede ceed cess go .

“table(s)” -a-ae-ae-am-ä Singular-ae-ärum-ïs-äs-ïs Plural Genitive table(s)” Dative table(s)” Accusative table(s)” Ablative table(s)” 1stDeclension Nouns Feminine Also find this chart in Latin for Children Primer A chapters 3 and 4, Latin for Children Primer B chapter 3, Latin for Children Primer C chapter 1, and Latin File Size: 1MBPage Count: 13

Book; adaptedtothe Public School Latin Primer. 12mo.5s. *«* TheabovefonrЬоэкзforma Courseof Latin Instruction. andare specially adaptedto facilitateandextendtheuseof thePublic SchoolLatin Primer. The CHILD'S LATIN PRIMER, or First Latin Lessons; withQuestionsandExercises, adaptedto cheprinciplesof the Public SchoolLatinPrimer. 12nio. 2s.

Exodus 1-18 Introduction The book of Exodus, volume 2 of the Pentateuch, develops the story that Genesis began. Exodus shows the outworking of the nation aspect of the 4-part covenant God made with Abraham: A great nation, a great land, a great name, and a great blessing (Genesis 12:1

Exodus 34:29-35 I didn’t realize how appropriate the title, “God Provides,” was until I began studying Exodus in preparation for sermons each week this summer. Back in April 4-5 members of our staff team met over lunch to do some

Feb 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ruary Old Te 1 Exodus 1 2 Exodus 1 3 Exodus 1 4 Exodus 1

A Deuteronomy, Numbers, Leviticus, Exodus, Genesis B Exodus, Deuteronomy, Genesis, Numbers, Leviticus C Leviticus, Genesis, Numbers, Exodus, Deuteronomy D Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy Which day is considered the spiritual birthday of the Church? A Christmas B Pentecost C The Annunciation D Ascension Thursday Test

behaviors are not recognized by an organization’s formal reward and recognition systems. Importantly though, Ramamoorthy et al. (2005) concluded that tendencies to engage in these extra-role behaviors can lead to enhanced team and organizational effectiveness and superior performance. Driven by the assumption that employees’ innovative work behavior contributes positively to work outcomes .