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842830Hospitality and Tourism 110Department of EducationEducational Programs & Services Branch2005

Table of ContentsAcknowledgements. iIntroduction . iiGCO 1 Introduction to the Hospitality and Tourism Industry .1GCO 2 Identify Tourism as it Relates to the Atlantic Region.5GCO 3 Demonstrate an understanding of marketing strategies, trends andtechnology .11GCO 4 Identify the eight sectors of the hospitality and tourism trade .13GCO 5 Demonstrate career opportunities in hospitality and tourism .15Appendix A .20Appendix B .24Recipe for Happy Tourists.24Sample Introductory Questions – Tourism .24P.A.M. Project .25What Do You Know About Your Community .26What Do You Know About NB?.27You Are A Travel Agent.28Pioneers of the Hospitality and Tourism Industry .29Eight Sectors of Hospitality and Tourism.30Journal Entry .31Guest Speaker Evaluation.32Career Plan .33Trip of a Lifetime.34Let’s Have a Party .36Project Ideas .37Sample IMC Activity .39Sample Computer Reservations Systems.40Placemat Activity .41Canadian Tourism Industry Sectors .42

AcknowledgementsThe Department of Education expresses its sincere appreciation to members ofthe CDAC for their expertise and insights in developing Hospitality and Tourism110. In addition, pilot teachers and those who contributed comments andsuggestions are to be commended for their commitment.Special thanks to: Heidi Brown Helen Crawford Tony Doiron Anne Gallant Margie Hickey Sharel Jacobs Leslie Smith Riba Riordan Fred VeyseySchool District 10School District 14School District 08School District 16School District 06School District 10NBCC - St. AndrewsSchool District 15School District 02The Department of Education recognizes the following organizations anddedicated individuals who provided valuable input and resources: New Brunswick Community College St. AndrewsTourism Industry Association of New BrunswickCanadian Tourism CouncilHospitality and Tourism 110i

IntroductionHospitality and Tourism 110 is an introductory course providing students with anawareness of career opportunities in a dynamic and growing industry sector.Students are made aware of potential social and economic benefits. Emphasis isplaced on Tourism in Atlantic Canada. A combination of sound businessprinciples and vision are demonstrated throughout the course.Learning ActivitiesThroughout this document, suggestions are provided for teaching and learningactivities and projects. Sample assignments are provided in Appendix B.Students may complete assignments individually or in groups. Teachers areencouraged to use these suggestions as well as develop their own.PrerequisiteNoneGeneral Curriculum OutcomesUpon the completion of this course, students will meet the following outcomes: GCO 1 Introduction to the hospitality and tourism industry.GCO 2 Identify tourism as it relates to the Atlantic region.GCO 3 Demonstrate an understanding of marketing strategies, trends andtechnology as it relates to hospitality and tourism.GCO 4 Identify the eight sectors of the hospitality and tourism trade.GCO 5 Demonstrate career opportunities in hospitality and tourism.Duration90 hoursCourse Code1237930Hospitality and Tourism 110ii

Hospitality & Tourism 110GCO 1 Introduction to the Hospitality and Tourism IndustrySpecific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: identify what hospitality andtourism is and why it is the largestindustry in the world.Suggestions for Teaching/Learning:Students brainstorm terms related to thehospitality and tourism industry and answer aseries of questions concerning the tourismindustry.Students interview ten people from theircommunity or neighbourhood asking for theirideas regarding what hospitality and tourismmeans to them.Teacher reads and discusses the Recipe forHappy Tourists. (Appendix B)Teacher formulates questions from informationfrom The Student’s Travel Map.Students visit a local business relating to thehospitality and tourism industry. While visiting,they must practice proper etiquette, personality,attitude and manners (skills learned in the PAMProject).Teacher plans an activity in which students willbe the guests and experience true hospitality. 1outline the history of thehospitality and tourism industryTeacher assigns teams of students to explore atimeline of lodging, travel or food and beveragethroughout the ages. (Roman Era, Middle Ages,17th – 19th Century, 20th Century.)Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 1 Introduction to the Hospitality and Tourism IndustrySuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Students record and share theirresponses using a flip chart, overheadprojector or a data projector.Nickerson, Norma Polovitz., and Kerr, Paula.Snapshots: An Introduction to Tourism, 3rdedition. Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2004ISBN: 0-13-120126-3Students create a word search puzzle orgame using the tourism-related termsthey have brainstormed.Howell, David.et.al. Passport: An Introductionto the Tourism Industry. 3rd edition. Toronto:Nelson, 2003 ISBN: 0-17-616966-0Students formulate their definition ofhospitality and tourism and submit awritten report, reflecting what hospitalityand tourism means to members of theircommunity.Teacher reviews the correct responses tothe questions and/or has students submitanswers on an individual basis or in pairs.A Guide to Tourism Careers, Education andTraining: The Student’s Travel Map. CanadianTourism Human Resource Council (availablethrough the Tourism Industry Association onNew Brunswick. Phone 506-458-5646Website: http://www.tianb.com)ISBN: 1-55304-335-9Students complete the PAM project.(Appendix B)Heritage Canada Foundation located online athttp://www.heritagecanada.orgTeacher hosts an activity in theclassroom, such as a breakfast or otherhospitality-related activity, invitingstudents as guests. After students enjoythis activity, they will write a letter ofthanks.Information about tourism is available Appendix BStudents prepare a poster to illustrate theRecipe for Happy Tourists. (Appendix B)Students create a timeline for one of theeight sectors of the industry.Hospitality and Tourism 1102

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 1 Introduction to the Hospitality and Tourism IndustrySpecific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: identify and explain the eightsectors of the hospitality andtourism industrySuggestions for Teaching/Learning:Students are briefly introduced to the eightsectors. Students may identify the eight sectorsand list examples of each, using informationfound on the Canadian Tourism HumanResource Council (CTHRC) website.Teachers may hand out Canadian IndustrySector pictures and have students identify eachone and include them in their notes.(Appendix B)Students use newspapers and the telephonebook to find articles or advertisements relatingto each of the eight sectors of tourism.3Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 1 Introduction to the Hospitality and Tourism IndustrySuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Have students create a title page orposter based on the eight sectors oftourism. Students may develop a posteror title page on one sector or a collage ofall eight sectors.Video: Saint John: Yesterday and Today.ISBN 0-9680392-2-7 Video available bycontacting: Michael Power, 42 Wasson Court,Saint John, NB, E2K 5L1Canada Heritage Foundation–available onlineat http://www.heritagecanada.orgHave students create a game based onthe eight sectors. For example:Concentration, Jeopardy or TrivialPursuit.Saltscapes: Canada’s East Coast magazinehttp://www.saltscapes.comSemester Project:Appendix BStudents create a title page for each ofthe eight sectors of tourism and collectarticles or advertisements for each sectorduring the semester. The project will bepresented for evaluation at the end of thesemester, either as a collection of foldersor envelopes (one for each sector) or asa scrapbook, binder, etc.Teacher administers a unit test on theintroduction to the hospitality and tourismindustry.Hospitality and Tourism 1104

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 2 Identify Tourism as it Relates to the Atlantic RegionSpecific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: identify local tourismSuggestions for Teaching/Learning:Teacher identifies points of interest in their owncommunity.Students identify landmarks in their communityand research their background or history.Teacher invites a guest to discuss local tourismand history.Teacher accompanies students on a visit to CityHall/Chamber/Welcome Center to speak withthe mayor and sign the guest book.Students use a map of their local area andidentify points of interest on it.Teacher creates a scavenger hunt for theircommunity. Groups of students participate in atimed event where certain tourism information isgathered, and students are required to check inat various points along the route.5Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 2 Identify Tourism as it Relates to the Atlantic RegionSuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Students will create a brochure, placemator other visual format to promote localtourism.NB Tourism on package available online)Students will use a map of the province toillustrate all highways/routes in theprovince leading to their community.General Information on New Brunswickavailable online athttp://www.new-brunswick.netStudents complete assignment “What doyou Know About your Community”.(Appendix B)Information on Tourism is available online athttp://www.gnb.ca/cnb/nb/nb-e.aspStudents prepare a PowerPointpresentation promoting tourism in theircommunity. This must have a minimum of10 slides.Maps – http://atlas.gc.ca (click on referencemaps, the provincial and territorial outline) orcontact your local tourism information centers.Hospitality and Tourism 1106

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 2 Identify Tourism as it Relates to the Atlantic RegionSpecific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: identify New Brunswickprovincial tourism and befamiliar with the five scenicdrivesSuggestions for Teaching/Learning:Teacher uses a map of the province to identifythe location of various landmarks and majorattractions.Students trace the five scenic drives on aprovincial map and identify major towns andcities along the way.Students research provincial facts: population,emblems, flag, climate, etc. categorize attractions, sightsand events that arerepresentative of the AtlanticprovincesStudents use the Atlantic provincial travelguides to gain an appreciation of variousopportunities and activities available in AtlanticCanada. (hard copy or online websites)Students research provincial facts: population,emblems, flag, climate, etc. for each Atlanticprovince.The teacher may take advantage of localattractions, sights and events or may choose toassign research projects for each of the AtlanticProvinces (NB, NS, PE, NF).The teacher, using printed resources, theInternet and/or guest speakers, will familiarizestudents about snowmobile trails and otherwinter activities available (i.e. snowmobileweek).7Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 2 Identify Tourism as it Relates to the Atlantic Region.Suggestions for Assessment:Resources:Have students identify the variousgeographical aspects of New Brunswick,using a blank map.Eiselt, Marianne. New Brunswick 2nd Ed.Formac Publishing Company. 1996ISBN 0-88780-344-XProvide students with worksheets basedon various geographical concepts andfollow up with a test on comprehension.The Official New Brunswick Travel MapContact your local Visitor Information Centre orcall1-800-561-0123 and request an InformationPackageAlso available at some NB Irving locationsStudents will be required to prepare apresentation (PowerPoint or written) onone of the scenic drives. Explainattractions, communities, events, etc.Students complete assignments “What doyou Know about New Brunswick” & “Youare a Travel Agent”. (Appendix B)Students present a written report outliningthe results of their research on the “Factsof each Atlantic province”.Poole, Stephen. Nova Scotia Colourguide 4thEd. Formac Publishing Company. 2000ISBN 0-88780-516-7Brinklow, Laurie. Prince Edward IslandColourguide. 2nd Ed. Formac PublishingCompany. 1999ISBN 0-88780-438-1Appendix BStudents may create an Atlantic TriviaGame and create questions and answersbased on the four Atlantic provinces andtheir research. Students may use recipecards and/or hard card stock or Bristolboard to create a game.Students develop an illustration (diagramor model) on a topic(s) agreed upon bythe teacher and class regarding theAtlantic Provinces.The teacher will administer a Unit Testbased on information from this unit.Hospitality and Tourism 1108

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 2 Identify Tourism as it Relates to the Atlantic Region.Specific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: demonstrate an understandingof the Atlantic provinces’ historyincluding the First Nations,Acadian, Loyalist and othercultures.Suggestions for Teaching/Learning:Teacher will ask students to research specialevents which relate to specific cultures inAtlantic Canada (Irish – St. Patrick’s Day, March17, Treaty Day, Oct 1, Aboriginal Day, June 21).Teacher will assess the annual theme ofHeritage Canada, placing an emphasis oncultural tourism.Visit historical/cultural sites.Students plan and host a Heritage Fair.9Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 2 Identify Tourism as it Relates to the Atlantic RegionSuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Teacher evaluates the Heritage Fair.For information on the Irish Canadian CultureAssociation of New Brunswick, click on:http://www.newirelandnb.ca/World Book EncyclopaediaGuest SpeakersContact Heritage Canada atwww.heritagecanada.org for a resourcepackage and more information.For information on First Nations in Nova Scotiaclick on: http://www.mns-firstnet.ca/Hospitality and Tourism 11010

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 3 Demonstrate an understanding of marketing strategies, trends andtechnology as it relates to hospitality and tourismSpecific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: understand the impact ofmarketing strategies:- Definition of marketing- Principles of marketing- Segmentation- Target Groups- Marketing Mix (P’s)- Integrated MarketingCommunications (IMC)Suggestions for Teaching/Learning:Using the recommended text book, the teacherexplains the definition of marketing, theprinciples of marketing and the marketing mix.Students create a one-page biography on awell-known marketing pioneer, with reference tothe Hospitality and Tourism Industry. (AppendixB)Students list slogans they hear on radio or seeon television that portray some aspect oftourism marketing.Students identify marketing characteristicsassociated with slogans used by varioustourism industries.Students develop unique advertisements and/orslogans that depict local tourism features. understand and identifychanging trends in theHospitality and Tourism IndustryStudents identify current trends, creating ascrapbook of newspaper clippings based on theIndustry.Students briefly summarize newspaperclippings to identify current trends in theindustry. 11understand the role oftechnology in the Hospitality andTourism IndustryUsing the Internet, students investigate variousreservations systems. (Appendix B – SampleCRS activity)Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 3 Demonstrate an understanding of marketing strategies, trends andtechnology as it relates to hospitality and tourismSuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Students distinguish between the fourways to market products based onadvertisements. (The Marketing Mix)Recommended Textbook:Students create a way to market anaspect of tourism within their owncommunity. The emphasis is on themarketing mix. For example, restaurants,new construction, walking tours and/orstudent-generated ideas.Nickerson, Norma Polovitz., and Kerr, Paula.Snapshots: An Introduction to Tourism. 3rdedition. Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2004.ISBN: 0-13-120126-3(Online Hospitality and Tourism 110 courseavailable through www.gnb.ca/0000/as/dl-e.aspcontact the distance facilitator for access)Students create a marketable souvenirfor visiting tourists.Hospitality and Tourism Marketing. AllistairMorrison (Delmar Publishing) 2nd Ed.ISBN 0-82736620-5Students compare and contrastadvertisements in local newspapers andmagazines, placing an emphasis onmarket segmentation and location withinthe newspaper or magazine.Tourism Planning: Basics Concepts Cases.Claire. A. Gunn (Taylor & Francis)ISBN 0-471-29392-xStudents produce a completed scrapbookwith clippings and a brief description ofeach article. Teachers will assign criteriafor the completed project.Assessment Criteria: organization,arrangement, content, colour, use ofcaptions and workmanship.Students research common computerreservations systems available in theHospitality and Tourism Industry andanswer questions created by the teacher.(Appendix B – Sample CRS activity)Tourism Economics. Donald E. Lundberg. JohnWiley & SonsISBN 0-471-57884-3NB Tourism Video- New Wave of AdventureInskeep, Edward. Tourism Planning . JohnWiley & SonsISBN 0-8448-1743-0Gartner, William. The Travel Industry. 3rdEdition: Thompson PublishingISBN 0-442-02478-9Howell, David. et.al. Passport: An Introductionto the Tourism Industry. 3rd edition. Toronto:Nelson, 2003.ISBN: 0-17-616966-0Appendix BHospitality and Tourism 11012

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 4 Identify the eight sectors of the hospitality and tourism tradeSpecific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: identify the eight sectors of theHospitality and TourismIndustry:- Accommodation- Adventure TourismRecreation- Attractions- Events and Conferences- Food and Beverage- Tourism Services- Transportation- Travel TradeSuggestions for Teaching/Learning:Teacher develops a presentation based uponthe eight sectors.Teacher invites representatives from TIANB topresent to the class.Teacher invites guest speakers from thecommunity representing the eight sectors.Teacher arranges tours to include the eightsectors.When planning an excursion or off-site activity,students prepare and present a proposaldemonstrating the importance and relevance ofthe activity.Students use the Internet to researchcategories, definitions, trends and careeropportunities for each sector.Students plan, prepare and execute a mini ormajor virtual or realistic trip.Teacher prepares an in-class scavengeractivity, based on the NB Travel Guide or onlinewebsite.13Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 4 Identify the eight sectors of the hospitality and tourism tradeSuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Students answer questions prepared bythe teacher, relating to the eight sectors.Nickerson, Norma Polovitz., and Kerr, Paula.Snapshots: An Introduction to Tourism. 3rdedition. Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2004.ISBN: 0-13-120126-3Students complete special activitiesdeveloped by TIANB. A guest profile orjournal entry may be completed bystudents. (Appendix B)Students complete a review andreflection sheet, validating and assessingtheir excursion or off-site experience.Teacher divides students into eightgroups to research and develop acreative presentation, bulletin boarddisplay, brochure or pamphlet on one ofthe eight sectors. Emphasis for studentwork should be based on contentinformation. (Appendix B for sampleactivity plan for placemat)Howell, David. et.al. Passport: An Introductionto the Tourism Industry. 3rd edition. Toronto:Nelson, 2003.ISBN: 0-17-616966-0General Information on Tourism available onlineat: http://www.cthrc.caNewfoundland & Labrador CD availablewww.gov.nf.ca/tourismWright, Ian. Canada: Exploring New Directions.4th Ed. Fitzhenry & Whiteside Ltd.,ISBN 1-55041-377-5TIANB – contact online at http://www.tianb.comStudents research a destination withinAtlantic Canada and create an itinerarywhich includes the purpose of the trip, themode of transportation, the length of thetrip, cost, accommodation, food andbeverage and other trip-related concepts.(Enrichment – execute the trip)Appendix BStudents complete assignment “EightSectors of Hospitality and Tourism”.(Appendix B)Complete GCO 1 Semester Project.Hospitality and Tourism 11014

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 5 Demonstrate career opportunities in hospitality and tourism.Specific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to: identify careers related to eachof the eight sectors of thehospitality and tourism industrySuggestions for Teaching/Learning:Students develop a presentation in the form of aPowerPoint presentation, poster or seminarrelated to job opportunities or careers in one ofthe eight sectors of the hospitality and tourismindustry.Students view online videos of careers relatedto hospitality and tourismhttp://vector.cfee.org/english/login.php 15complete a student interestinventoryStudents use the Choices program or anInternet-related website to create a StudentInterest Checklist, based on their strengths andareas of interest.Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 5 Demonstrate career opportunities in hospitality and tourismSuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Teacher divides the students into groupsto create a presentation on careersrelated to the hospitality and tourismindustry.Information on career opportunities in Tourismis available at http://www.cthrc.ca.A Guide to Tourism Careers, Education andTraining: The Student’s Travel Map.Students develop questions, makecontact with and interview an individual in Choices Program (available in most ComputerLabs)the hospitality and tourism industry.Students present the results of theNational Occupation Standard Binderinterview to the class by either inviting(availablethrough Guidance and Cooperativeguests or showing video.Education department of your school)Students prepare a current resume, writeGeneral Information about career opportunitiesa covering letter (letter of application),is available online at: http://www.careers.caparticipate in mock interviews andprepare a follow-up letter.Linking to the Future Binder (available throughGuidance and Cooperative Educationdepartment of your school)Career Week Materials (available throughGuidance and Cooperative Educationdepartment of your school)Hospitality and Tourism 11016

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 5 Demonstrate career opportunities in hospitality and tourismSpecific Curriculum Outcomes:Students will be expected to:Suggestions for Teaching/Learning: identify three career paths whichare of interest and meaningful tothe student.Students choose a career that is of interest andmeaningful to them and develop a career plan. identify various post-secondaryinstitutions offering hospitalityand tourism trainingStudents research post-secondary institutionsthat prepare for a career in the hospitality andtourism industry. Using the sample career plan(Appendix B), students will locate and recordthe name of each institution, its location, adescription of the programs offered, theentrance requirements, the length and cost ofstudy and job opportunities available uponcompletion. describe and apply the threeparts of WHMIS:- Labels and symbols- MSDS- Responsibilities of supplier,employee and employer.Teacher invites a guest speaker from WHSCCto provide WHMIS training to students.The teacher may provide students with picturesof containers of hazardous products from theworkplace or symbols from hazardous productsand ask students to identify the hazard and howto respond.Teacher introduces WHMIS and MSDS usingthe website.17Hospitality and Tourism 110

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 110GCO 5 Demonstrate career opportunities in hospitality and tourismSuggestions for Assessment:Resources:Students include a completed career planfor their professional portfolio.Appendix BGuest speakers from the industry and NBCC orother local Colleges.Students complete Certificationrequirements, such as: Red SealHACCP Safe Food Handling programsISO 2001Passport to SafetyLooking for a Job – Innovations and Learningfor Canadians (HRDC)available in hard copy oronline at: http://www.youth.gc.ca ( click onpublications)Test students on their knowledge ofWHMIS and its importance in theworkplace.WHMIS website: General ntro whmis.htmlStudents tour workplaces and listhazardous products.Passport to Safety Website available athttp://www.passporttosafety.comTeacher prepares a question sheet fromthe website to include why WHMIS wasdeveloped, its purpose, law, etc.Safety NB available online athttp://www.nbsafety.comStudents research and prepare a MSDSfor a product in the lab.WHSCC – contact Silvy Moleman at 1-800-2229775 for information for High School students(Workplace Health, Safety and CompensationCommission of New Brunswick) or online at:http://www.whscc.nb.caStudents complete the “Trip of a LifetimeProject”. (Appendix B) This project coversall aspects of the tourism industry andmay replace a final exam.An E-course produced by Workplace Safety &Insurance Board of Ontario is available onlineat: http://www.hs101.caSee other sample projects in Appendix BAppendix BHospitality and Tourism 11018

APPENDICIES

Appendix ASuggested ResourcesNickerson, Norma Polovitz., and Kerr, Paula. Snapshots: An Introduction to Tourism.3rd edition. Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2004.ISBN: 0-13-120126-3Howell, David. Et.al. Passport: An Introduction to the Tourism Industry. 3rd edition.Toronto: Nelson, 2003.ISBN: 0-17-616966-0Resources by GCO:GCO 1:Nickerson, Norma Polovitz., and Kerr, Paula. Snapshots: An Introduction to Tourism.3rd edition. Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2004.ISBN: 0-13-120126-3Howell, David. et. al. Passport: An Introduction to the Tourism Industry. 3rd edition.Toronto: Nelson, 2003.ISBN: 0-17-616966-0A Guide to Tourism Careers, Education and Training: The Student’s Travel Map.Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (available through the Tourism IndustryAssociation of New Brunswick. Phone 506-458-5646 website: http://www.tianb.com)ISBN 1-55304-335—9Heritage Canada Foundation located online at http://www.heritagecanada.orgInformation about Tourism is available at www.gnb.ca/cnb/nb/nb-e.aspOnline Hospitality and Tourism 110 course available through www.gnb.ca/0000/as/dl-e.aspcontact the distance facilitator for access)Information on the Eight Sectors in Tourism is available at http://www.cthrc.ca.(Click on career planning, then Sectors in Tourism)TIANB – guest speakerGCO 2:NB Tourism Website is available online at http://www.tourismnewbrunswick.ca(Can also request an information package online)Information on Tourism is available online at http://www.gnb.ca/cnb/nb/nb-e.aspHospitality and Tourism 11020

Maps are available online at http://atlas.gc.ca (click on reference maps, the provincialand territorial outline)General Information on New Brunswick available online at http://www.new-brunswick.netVideo: Over Canada: an Aerial Adventure. Hard copy pictorial also available at NBPublic Libraries.To request a copy or for information about the NB Public Library go to:http://vision.gnb.ca (click on search the catalogue and type the title)Teachers Guide by Gary Gibson available online at: http://www.magiclantern.caPhone 1-416-675-1155. Or BC Tourism- online at http://www.hellobc.com)Video: Saint John: Yesterday and Today. ISBN 0-9680392-2-7Video available by contacting: Michael Power, 42 Wasson Court, Saint John, NB, E2K5L1Canada Heritage Foundation–available online at http://www.heritagecanada.orgSaltscapes: Canada’s east coast magazine http://www.saltscapes.comEiselt, Marianne. New Brunswick. 2nd Ed. Formac Publishing Company. 1996ISBN 0-88780-344-XPoole, Stephen. Nova Scotia Colourguide 4th Ed. Formac Publishing Company. 2000ISBN 0-88780-516-7Brinklow, Laurie. Prince Edward Island Colourguide. 2nd Ed. Formac PublishingCompany. 1999 ISBN 0-88780-438-1GCO 3:Hospitality and Tourism Online

Hospitality & Tourism 110 GCO 1 Introduction to the Hospitality and Tourism Industry Specific Curriculum Outcomes: Students will be expected to: identify what hospitality and tourism is and why it is the largest industry in the world. be the guests and experience true hospitality. outline the history of the hospitality and tourism industry

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