The University Of Arizona Master Of Landscape Architecture Program 2007 .

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The University of ArizonaMaster of Landscape Architecture Program2007 – 2013Landscape Architecture Accreditation BoardSelf-Evaluation ReportFirst-Professional Programs inLandscape ArchitectureAmerican Society of Landscape Architects636 Eye Street, N.W.Washington, D.C. 20001-3736

Table of ContentsProgram Self-Evaluation Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iMinimum Requirements for Achieving and Maintaining Accredited Status. . . . iiIntroduction1. History of the Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. Response to Suggestions from previous LAAB Visit. . . . . .3. Current Strengths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. Current Weaknesses and Challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Program Changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Participants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. .5. .7. 18. 19. 20Standards1. Program Mission and ObjectivesBackground. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21The University of Arizona: Strategic Plan, Vision, Mission and Values. 21Arizona Board of Regents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture. . . . . 23A. Program Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23B. Educational Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24C. Educational Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24D. Long Range Planning Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26E. Planning Disclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292. Program Autonomy, Governance & AdministrationA. Program Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B. Institutional Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C. Commitment to Diversity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D. Faculty Participation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E. Faculty Numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30323638393. The Professional CurriculumA. Mission and Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43B. Program Curriculum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44C. Syllabi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56D. Curriculum Evaluation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56E. Augmentation of Formal Educational Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . 57F. Coursework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57G. Areas of Interest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57H. Research/Scholarly Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574. Student and Program OutcomesA. Student Learning Outcomes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63B. Student Advising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66C. Participation in Extra Curricular Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

5. FacultyA. Credentials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71B. Faculty Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72C. Faculty Retention. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 816. Outreach to the Institution, Communities, Alumni & PractitionersA. Interaction with the Institution, and Public. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82B. Interaction with the Profession, Alumni and Practitioners. . . . . . . . . 937. Facilities, Equipment and TechnologyA. Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95B. Information Systems and Technical Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97C. Library Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99AddendaA. Program Details1. Faculty Resources.2. Faculty Resources:3. Faculty Resources:4. Faculty Degrees. . . . . .Male. .Female. . . . . . . . . 102. . . . . 102. . . . . 105. . . . . 105B. Curriculum1. Required and Elective Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1042. Typical Program of Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1063. Landscape Architectural Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107C. Student Information1. Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1092. Ethnic Group/Diversity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1093. Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1094. Enrollments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1105. Student Ethnic Backgrounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1106. Awards Given to MLA Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110D. Alumni Information1. Degrees Awarded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. Record of Advanced Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. a. MLA Graduates Current Employment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. b. MLA Graduates Current Employment – Details. . . . . . . . . . . .112112113113E. Faculty Information1. Previous and Present Faculty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1172. Instructional Assignments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1173. Courses Taught by Individual Faculty Members. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1184. Visiting Lecturers and Critics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1205. Individual Teacher’s Record. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123F. Facilities Information1. Program Facilities Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1572. Steps for Improvements to Facilities and Data Spaces. . . . . . . . . . 1582. Program Facilities Floor Plans and Shared Spaces. . . . . . . . . . . . 158

AppendicesA. The University of Arizona Teacher Evaluation Forms. . . . . . . . . . 164B. Abbreviated Syllabi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167List of TablesTable 2. 1. State Budget Cuts to MLA Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32Table 2. 2. MLA Program Graduate Tuition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Table 2. 3. UA Graduate College Funds to MLA Program. . . . . . . . . . 33Table 2. 4. MLA Students Hired in Graduate Positions. . . . . . . . . . . . 34Table 2. 5. MLA Program Financial Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34Table 2. 6. Faculty to Student Ratio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Table 2. 7. MLA Personnel Gender Diversity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36Table 2. 8. Faculty Members Degrees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39Table 3. 1. Three Forms of Instruction Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44Table 3. 2. MLA Required Course Curriculum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48Table 3. 3. Summary of Key Objectives for MLA Courses. . . . . . . . . . 55Table 3. 4. Examples of Awards Given to MLA Students. . . . . . . . . . 56Table 3. 5. Theses and Master’s Reports, 2007 – 2012. . . . . . . . . . . . 58Table 4. 1. MLA Program Student Data, 2007 – 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . .69List of FiguresFigure 2. 1. CAPLA Organizational Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31Figure 3. 1. Curriculum Concept. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Program Self-Evaluation ReportFor the Academic Year2012-2013InstitutionThe University of ArizonaProgramLandscape ArchitectureDegree TitleMaster of Landscape ArchitectureChief AdministrativeOfficial of the UniversityAnn Hart, PhD, PresidentThe University of ArizonaAdministration Building, Room 7121401 East University BoulevardTucson, Arizona 85721-0066hartaw@email.arizona.eduTelephone Number: (520) 621-5511Senior Vice President ofAcademic Affairs and ProvostAndrew C. Comrie, PhDTelephone: (520) 621-1856Email: comrie@email.arizona.eduChief AdministrativeOfficial of the CollegeJanice A. Cervelli, FASLA, FCELA, DeanCollege of Architecture, Planning, and LandscapeArchitecture1040 N. Olive, Room 120GP.O. Box 210075Tucson, Arizona 85721-0075jcervell@email.arizona.eduTelephone Number: (520) 621-6754http://capla.arizona.eduChief AdministrativeOfficial of the ProgramLauri Macmillan Johnson, ASLAProfessor and DirectorSchool of Landscape Architecture and Planning1040 N. Olive, Room A303AP.O. Box 210075The University of ArizonaTucson, Arizona 85721-0444ljohnson@email.arizona.eduTelephone Number: (520) 621-8790Report Submitted byLauri Macmillan Johnson, ASLAProfessor and Directori

Minimum Requirements for Achieving and Maintaining Accredited StatusThese conditions must be met for a program to apply for accredited status:1. The Program title and degree description incorporate the term "Landscape Architecture."2. An undergraduate first-professional program is a baccalaureate of at least four academic years'duration.3. A graduate first-professional program is a master's equivalent to three academic years' duration.4. Faculty instructional full-time equivalence (FTE) shall be as follows:a. An academic unit that offers a single first-professional program has at least three FTEinstructional faculty who hold professional degrees in landscape architecture, at least one ofwhom is full-time.b. An academic unit that offers first-professional programs at both bachelor's and master'slevels, has at least six instructional FTE, at least five of whom hold professional degrees inlandscape architecture, and at least two of whom are full-time.5. The parent institution is accredited by a recognized institutional accrediting agency.6. There is a designated program administrator responsible for the leadership and managementfunctions for the program under review.7. A program accredited by LAAB shall:a. Continuously comply with accreditation standards;b. Pay the annual sustaining and other fees as required; andc. Regularly file complete annual and other requested reports.The program administrator shall inform LAAB if any of these factors fails to apply during anaccreditation period.The University of Arizona Master of Landscape Architecture Program meets the minimum conditions toapply for LAAB accreditation.Lauri Macmillan Johnson, ASLAProfessor and DirectorFebruary 25, 2013ii

Introduction: 1. History of the ProgramIntroduction1. History of the Program1891The University of Arizona admits its first students.August 1966A major in landscape architecture is established in the Department ofHorticulture.October 1966The four-year Bachelor of Science curriculum in landscape architectureis approved, and is listed in 1967 – 1969 Biennial Catalog.1969A Master of Science with a major in landscape architecture degree isauthorized and listed in the Graduate Catalog.1973-1974The four-year Bachelor of Science degree in landscape architecturereceives Initial Accreditation.December 1974A four-year Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree and a Master ofLandscape Architecture degree are approved by the Arizona Board ofRegents, replacing the Bachelor of Science and MS degrees; the Schoolof Renewable Natural Resources and the Environment is approved by theRegents, with Landscape Architecture as a unit of the new School.1975-1976The four-year Bachelor of Landscape Architecture curriculum isreaccredited for a three-year period.November 1975The Master of Landscape Architecture Program is approved; a five-yearBachelor of Landscape Architecture curriculum is proposed andapproved by the College of Agriculture.August 1976The five-year Bachelor of Landscape Architecture curriculum isimplemented.June 1979The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture curriculum is reaccredited for anormal five-year period.January 1984A three-year Master of Landscape Architecture curriculum isimplemented.January 1985The five-year Bachelor of Landscape Architecture is revised to a fouryear curriculum due to growth of the graduate program.Spring 1991The five-year Bachelor of Landscape Architecture curriculum isreinitiated, and is visited by an accreditation team.The University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation ReportPage 1

Introduction: 1. History of the ProgramJuly 1991The LAAB votes for Initial Accreditation of the five-year Bachelor ofLandscape Architecture curriculum.August 1993Due primarily to faculty strengths and interests and to continuing budgetcuts, the Landscape Architecture Faculty vote to phase out the Bachelorof Landscape Architecture curriculum; phase-out of landscapearchitecture courses is initiated with the 1993-1994 academic year.July 1994The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture curriculum is accredited for anormal five-year period.January 1995The Master of Landscape Architecture Program is moved to a formerEpiscopal Church building located at 1501 E. Speedway Boulevard.August 1996A three-year Master of Landscape Architecture First Professional degreecurriculum is (re)initiated.July 1997The Program is transferred from the School of Renewable NaturalResources to the College of Architecture.1997/1998College of Architecture renamed College of Architecture, Planning andLandscape Architecture (CAPLA).May 1998The final BLA class graduates; the Bachelor of Landscape Architecturecurriculum and degree terminated.Spring 1998The Master of Landscape Architecture Program receives the normalthree year initial accreditation from Landscape ArchitectureAccreditation Board.August 1998Dr. Margaret Livingston is appointed as a full-time Assistant Professorof Landscape Architecture.July 1999Mario Schjetman is appointed Professor-in-Practice and Director for athree year term.July 2001Dr. Mintai Kim appointed as a full-time Assistant Professor ofLandscape Architecture.Spring 2001The Master of Landscape Architecture Program receives the maximumsix year accreditation from the Landscape Architecture AccreditationBoard.July 2001Mario Schjetman resigns and Oscar Blazquez is appointed AssistantDirector for one year.August 2002Ronald Stoltz is appointed Professor and Director.The University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation ReportPage 2

Introduction: 1. History of the ProgramJanuary 2003School of Landscape Architecture threatened with closure.Spring 2003Provost announces that proposal to close the School of LandscapeArchitecture is reversed – finds argument to retain the Program as“persuasive.” College is renamed the College of Architecture andLandscape Architecture (CALA). The MS in Planning leaves theCollege.Fall 2003New Master of Landscape Architecture curriculum implemented.Fall 2005Ground is broken for new addition to the Architecture Building wherethe Landscape Architecture program will move to in May, 2007.January 2007Design Intelligence names the Master of Landscape ArchitectureProgram at The University of Arizona as the #1 Graduate Program in thewestern United States.Spring 2007Lauri Macmillan Johnson promoted to full Professor.Spring 2007The Master of Landscape Architecture Program receives the maximumsix year accreditation from the Landscape Architecture AccreditationBoard.July 2007Dr. Mintai Kim resigns from the Program.2007-2009Elizabeth Scott is hired as Visiting Professor.2009Elizabeth Scott is hired as Assistant Professor.June 31, 2005Dr. Richard Eribes retires as Dean of College of Architecture andLandscape Architecture (CALA).July 1, 2005Charles Albanese is appointed Dean of CALA.July 2008Janice Cervelli, FASLA, FCELA, is appointed Dean of CALA.Fall 2009The Master of Science in Planning returns to the College and isadministrated with the program of landscape architecture; the School ofLandscape Architecture is renamed the School of LandscapeArchitecture and Planning.July 2009Ronald Stoltz is appointed Associate Dean of CALA: he retains hisposition as the Director.July 2009Lauri Macmillan Johnson is appointed Program Coordinator.2010Margaret Livingston is promoted to full Professor.The University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation ReportPage 3

Introduction: 1. History of the ProgramJuly 2010Lauri Macmillan Johnson is appointed the Director; Ronald Stoltz retainsposition as Associate Dean.Spring 2011College receives approval for new undergraduate degree; Bachelors ofScience in Sustainable Built Environments (SBE) degree.Fall 2012College name changes back to the College of Architecture, Planning, andLandscape Architecture, (CAPLA).The University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation ReportPage 4

Introduction: 2. Response to Suggestions2. Response to SuggestionsThe 2007 Report of the Visiting Team included five suggestions. LAAB does not require programsto respond to these suggestions; however below is a brief discussion regarding how thesesuggestions were addressed.Suggestion 1: (Standard 2)Establish recruiting strategies that target under-represented student populations.Response: The following recruiting strategies were developed.A multi-focused approach was adopted to include presentations, career events, open housesocials, and the development of a new website. The website includes interesting facts andstrengths about the School, community outreach projects, and alumni information. Samplesof student work have been essential marketing tools for potential candidates. Faculty andstudent accomplishments and recognitions are distributed in electronic newsletters andposted on the website. Social networking—conferences and other programs are profiled inFacebook to encourage current students to discuss the Program in a peer-to-peer venue.Service learning and outreach accomplishments are reported in local newspapers andtelevision.Personal one-on-one contact between potential students and the Director/GraduateCoordinator/faculty/students have achieved good results. The Program tracks students whohave already expressed an interest. The Director and faculty members contact everyinterested potential applicant with personal emails and phone calls. Consistent follow up iscritical. Student leaders also contact potential students and candidates are invited to visit.African American student Kendra Hyson has volunteered to organize efforts to recruitunder-represented candidates through her contacts at Spelman and Morehouse Colleges.The Program strives to raise awareness about the profession of landscape architecture andour School among existing UA students particularly underrepresented groups. The Programinvites student guests to open house events and studio presentations. The undergraduatePrograms of Architecture and Sustainable Built Environments (SBE) in the College ofArchitecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, (CAPLA) have created an excellentpool of candidates. Several students from architecture have been recruited; they receiveadvanced standing and tuition scholarships. A high percentage of these students areminority students. Undergraduate students in SBE have an area of concentration insustainable landscapes—qualified students are able to take graduate level courses in theirfourth year and complete the Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) in two years.Overall the MLA Program has increased the level of tuition scholarships for underrepresented students. The following table demonstrates an increase in under-representedstudents.Percentage of Under-represented Students.Minority Student %Total Enrolled -08Under-represented 10%The University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation Report8%Page 5

Introduction: 2. Response to SuggestionsSuggestion 2: (Standard 2)Hold more frequent meetings of the full faculty.Response: Faculty meetings are held twice a month. Agendas are distributed and minutesare recorded.Suggestion 3: (Standard 3)Reinforce computer and construction skills learned in first year studios in subsequent studiocourses.Response: The following courses have been added to the curriculum: LAR 530 Introductionto Digital Media, LAR 531 3D Modeling and Visualization, and LAR 533 AdvancedGraphics. These classes have enhanced knowledge and skills learned in the first year of theProgram. Studio course emphasize the application of both construction methods andcomputer skills. The Program emphasizes both hand graphic and digital communication fordesign visualization and final representation.Suggestion 4: (Standard 5)Consider ways in which orientation materials and activities and the website can moreeffectively prepare students for entry into an intense design program.Response: All course materials including syllabi, selected course assignments, studioproblem statements, and reading assignments are included on the website. Most coursesutilize the University Desire to Learn (D2L) website. Through this website weeklyassignments can be posted to specific course sites. The course materials posted on D2L areavailable to all registered students from on-campus and remote locations. D2L has an emailfunction where announcements and class questions can be posted and students candownload assignments. Faculty members post student designs and other examples includingstudio, site engineering, and construction projects as well as history/theory papers andgraphic posters created by students from previous years. Students have expressed a highlevel of satisfaction with D2L and feel better prepared to advance in the Program.Suggestion 5: (Standard 8)Resolve the status of the Tejido Group so that the Program can contribute to and benefitfrom interdisciplinary research and outreach opportunities of the College’s DrachmanInstitute.Response: The Tejido Group was a name given by students from several years ago whowere engaged in a community design project coordinated by Professor Frederickson. Hekept the name as the unofficial brand for his service learning outreach studio projects.Currently these community projects are coordinated under the Drachman Institute.The University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation ReportPage 6

Introduction: 3. Current Strengths3. Current StrengthsProfessional Practice EmphasisOur primary mission is the development of highly proficient design practitioners. Ourcurriculum focuses on preparing students for practice and engaging them in applied scholarshipthat advances the profession of landscape architecture. We employ real-world learningexperiences that enable students to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Our commitment tostudent-centered learning and practice-based education focuses design decision making withstrategies centered on the creation and management of sustainable built environments. We takepride in our collegial studio approach toward the integration of scholarship and communityoutreach with teaching. Our Program attracts highly qualified students who find excellentemployment opportunities after graduation. We prepare students for entry-level practiceinvolving them in a variety of project types and scales including community and campus masterplans; urban park systems, plazas and green streets; industrial restoration; habitat creation;neighborhood design; and more.Students learn to work collaboratively within multi-disciplinary working environments. Theyreceive experience in site planning and landscape planning within the scope of a variety ofproject scales and diverse programs. They practice and demonstrate applied knowledge indesign thinking, history and theory, landscape ecology, construction and site engineering, anddesign graphics including hand drawing and digital media with 3-D modeling. They receiveinstruction on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with application for landscape planningand advanced opportunities to use the decision making tools of GeoDesign. Our studentscompete well in the national job market for their proficiencies in these areas as well as theirknowledge in professional practice, plants and design, and scholarship as applied to practice.We believe our students develop comprehensive design skills that advance the practice andprofession of landscape architecture.Sustainable Design for Arid EnvironmentsOur Program specializes in sustainable design for arid environments with applications thatextend beyond this region. We offer a range of opportunities for our students within Tucson,Arizona, and the Sonoran Desert as a learning laboratory for sustainable urban design,restoration of public and private lands, preservation of cultural heritage, and communityrevitalization. Service learning and outreach engagement is a primary core value.Our faculty research and courses are centered on best practices that emphasize design of wholefunctioning systems for human and ecological health. We prepare students for practice byproviding opportunities to participate in the development of emerging ideas. We promoteinclusive site development and decision making processes toward: effective stormwatermanagement, climate balance, air and water cleansing, erosion control, conservation practices,energy efficiency and production, cultural enhancement, human aesthetic experiences, andphysical and mental well-being.Location in Tucson, the Sonoran Desert, and the SouthwestThe MLA Program at The University of Arizona believes that the rich cultural heritage andphysical setting of the Sonoran Desert and Southwest provide an invaluable resource for theThe University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation ReportPage 7

Introduction: 3. Current Strengthsstudy and practice of landscape architecture. In 2006, Arizona became the fastest growing statein the nation.The population of Arizona is predicted to double by 2040 and becomeolder and more diverse. Population growth will bring 410 million squarefeet of new non-residential construction and 293,000 residential units inTucson, alone. Challenged by edge conditions of an extreme climate,Arizona has been designated as ground zero for climate change andassociated declines of the desert ecosystem and water supplies. Currentsprawl-oriented development is unsustainable in the Sun Corridor andpotential conflicts between agricultural, recreational, and urban land usesare both foreseeable and preventable (CAPLA Strategic Plan, 20132017).The pressure of rationalizing rapid population growth with diminishing natural resources is asignificant challenge for the profession and for our MLA Program. We seek to advance andpromote the conservation and stewardship of human, intellectual, cultural, financial, andenvironmental resources within our region. We use this laboratory to enhance our wellestablished belief in the benefits of place-based learning where connections can be madebetween desert ecology and our diverse cultural heritage toward appropriate and sustainabledesign.Location at the UA Research and a Land Grant UniversityThe University of Arizona is a public research University and belongs to the prestigiousAssociation of American Universities. The location of the School of Landscape Architectureand Planning at The University of Arizona is an ideal setting that engages our intellectualcommunity in significant shared teaching, research, and outreach opportunities that serve theState of Arizona and its diverse population.As part of the land-grant institution in Arizona, the MLA Program has undertaken significantoutreach and service in all three years of the curriculum including theses and master’s reports.Approximately 70% of all studio projects are for real communities and clients.Interdisciplinary OpportunitiesThe MLA Program has been successful in building interdisciplinary relationships withacademic departments, centers, and institutes across the campus as well as community groups,public agencies, and private corporations around important topics of urban revitalization,landscape performance, water and habitat conservation, cultural heritage and interpretation,visual quality, outdoor learning, transit, and health and well-being.Faculty and students have been engaged with other UA units including: Institute of theEnvironment, the College of Science, the School of Natural Resources, the College ofEducation, Eller College, College of Public Health, and the Water Resource Research Center toname a few. Faculty members have collaborated with other universities; examples include theUniversity of California, Maryland University, and Idaho State University. Research andoutreach partnerships have included the National Park Service; the Navajo Nations; localgovernment agencies including Pima County, City of Tucson, and Arizona Towns of Greer,Bisbee, Springerville, Show Low, Marana, and Pinetop. Faculty and students have partneredwith organizations including Biosphere 2, Rain Bird, and the Raytheon Corporation.The University of Arizona, Landscape Architecture Program Accreditation ReportPage 8

Introduction: 3. Current StrengthsInternational relationships have been developed in Sonora including Puerto Lobos, San Carlos,Mexico; Amman, Jordan; Panama City, Panama; Birzeit; Palestine; and Muscat, Oman.Affiliation and Integration with CAPLA and Other Programs at the UniversityThe MLA Program is located in the School of Landscape Architecture and Planning atCAPLA. The two academic units have autonomy with respect to program missions and goals,curricular issues, faculty meetings, faculty reviews, and budgets. There are however,opportunities for these programs to interact and collaborate on common areas of interestincluding site planning, urban planning, landscape planning, and tools made available throughGeoDesign. GeoDesign is an emerging field in which technology is merged with design,research, and analytical rigor toward the development of decision making strategies for bestpractices in physical planning and urban design. This evolving field fosters integration betweenplanning, landscape architecture, and architecture. The MS in Planning Program offers aconcentration in GeoDesign with the intent to establish a certificate of GeoDesign open to allUA students. As this evolves, there are currently several courses available to lands

of Landscape Architecture curriculum; phase-out of landscape architecture courses is initiated with the 1993-1994 academic year. July 1994 The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture curriculum is accredited for a normal five-year period. January 1995 The Master of Landscape Architecture Program is moved to a former

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