Metro Vancouver 2040

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SUSTAINABLE REGION INITIATIVE.TURNING IDEAS INTO ACTIONRegional Growth StrategyBylaw No.1136, 2010Metro Vancouver 2040Shaping Our FutureAdopted by theGreater Vancouver Regional District Boardon July 29, 2011www.metrovancouver.org

GREATER VANCOUVER REGIONAL DISTRICTBYLAW NO. 1136, 2010A Bylaw to Adopt a Regional Growth Strategy for the Greater Vancouver Regional DistrictWHEREAS Part 25 of the Local Government Act permits a regional district to undertake the development,adoption, implementation and monitoring of a Regional Growth Strategy,AND WHEREAS the Board of the Greater Vancouver Regional District by resolution on April 21, 2006, initiatedthe preparation of the Regional Growth Strategy pursuant to section 854 of theLocal Government Act,NOW THEREFORE, the Board of the Greater Vancouver Regional District, in open meeting assembled, enactsas follows:1. Pursuant to section 863(1) of the Local Government Act, the Metro Vancouver 2040 Regional GrowthStrategy, attached hereto and forming part of this Bylaw, is hereby adopted.2. The official citation of this bylaw is “Greater Vancouver Regional District Regional Growth Strategy BylawNumber 1136, 2010”. This Bylaw may be cited as “Metro Vancouver 2040 Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw”.READ A FIRST TIME this 12th day of November, 2010READ A SECOND TIME this 12th day of November, 2010Public Hearing held the 24th day of November, 2010; reconvened the 30th day of November, 2010; reconvenedthe 1st day of December 2010; reconvened and concluded the 2nd day of December, 2010.SECOND READING RESCINDED this 14th day of January, 2011READ A SECOND TIME AS AMENDED this 14th day of January, 2011READ A THIRD TIME this . day of . . , 2011RECONSIDERED, PASSED, AND FINALLY ADOPTED this . day of . . , 2011Amended by the Greater Vancouver Regional District Regional Growth StrategyAmendment Bylaw No. 1150, 2011, on October 28, 2011.ii

ACCEPTED, BY RESOLUTION by the Village of Anmoreon the 8th by the Village of Belcarraon the 21st day of February, 2011 by the City of Burnabyon the 7th by the City of Coquitlamon the 25th day of July, 2011 by the Corporation of Deltaon the 7th by the City of Langleyon the 21st day of February, 2011 by the Township of Langleyon the 7th by the Village of Lions Bayon the 24th day of January, 2011 by the District of Maple Ridgeon the 22nd day of March, 2011 by the City of New Westminsteron the 14th day of March, 2011 by the City of North Vancouveron the 7th by the District of North Vancouveron the 21st day of March, 2011 by the City of Pitt Meadowson the 1st by the City of Port Coquitlamon the 14th day of March, 2011 by the City of Port Moodyon the 8th by the City of Richmondon the 28th day of February, 2011 by the City of Surreyon the 28th day of February, 2011 by the Tsawwassen First Nationon the 2nd day of March, 2011 by the City of Vancouveron the 3rdday of March, 2011 by the District of West Vancouveron the 7thday of March, 2011 by the City of White Rockon the 7thday of March, 2011 by the Fraser Valley Regional Districton the 22nd day of February, 2011 by the Squamish-Lillooet Regional Districton the 28th day of February, 2011 by the South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authorityon the 11th day of March, 2011day of March, 2011day of March, 2011day of February, 2011day of March, 2011day of March, 2011day of March, 2011day of April, 2011Paulette A.Vetleson Lois E. JacksonCORPORATE SECRETARY Chairiii

Vision StatementSustainable Region InitiativeMetro Vancouver has an opportunity and a vision to achieve what humanity aspires to on a globalbasis – the highest quality of life embracing cultural vitality, economic prosperity, social justice andcompassion, all nurtured in and by a beautiful and healthy natural environment.We will achieve this vision by embracing and applying the principles of sustainability, not least ofwhich is an unshakeable commitment to the well-being of current and future generations and thehealth of our planet, in everything we do.As we share our efforts in achieving this vision, we are confident that the inspiration and mutuallearning we gain will become vital ingredients in our hopes for a sustainable common future.Regional Growth StrategyMetro Vancouver is a region of diverse communities where people in all their infinite variety live,work and play, aspiring to create a region even more livable for future generations than it is forthose who live here today. The pattern and form of development is seen as critical in maintainingharmony with nature, fostering community well-being and ensuring economic prosperity. Localand regional land use plans and transportation services and infrastructure are carefully integratedthrough inclusive and respectful planning processes which characterize Metro Vancouver’scollaborative governance system.iv

Table of ContentsAThe Sustainability Framework: Context for the Regional Growth Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1BScope and Linkages to Other Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3CChallenges and Responses .DRegional Land Use Designations and Overlays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9EGoals, Strategies and Actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6GOAL 1 Create a Compact Urban Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13STRATEGY 1.1Contain urban development within the Urban Containment Boundary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .STRATEGY 1.2Focus growth in Urban Centres and Frequent Transit Development Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1416STRATEGY 1.3Protect Rural areas from urban development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21GOAL 2 Support a Sustainable Economy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25STRATEGY 2.1Promote land development patterns that support a diverseregional economy and employment close to where people live . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26STRATEGY 2.2Protect the supply of industrial land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27STRATEGY 2.3Protect the supply of agricultural land andpromote agricultural viability with an emphasis on food production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29GOAL 3 Protect the Environment and Respond to Climate Change Impacts.STRATEGY 3.1Protect Conservation and Recreation lands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34STRATEGY 3.2Protect and enhance natural features and their connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37STRATEGY 3.3 Encourage land use and transportation infrastructure that reduce energy consumption andgreenhouse gas emissions, and improve air quality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40STRATEGY 3.4Encourage land use and transportation infrastructure that improve the ability towithstand climate change impacts and natural hazard risks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42GOAL 4 Develop Complete Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45STRATEGY 4.1Provide diverse and affordable housing choices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46STRATEGY 4.2Develop healthy and complete communities with access to a range of services and amenities. . . . . . . . 47GOAL 5 Support Sustainable Transportation Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51STRATEGY 5.1Coordinate land use and transportation to encouragetransit, multiple-occupancy vehicles, cycling and walking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52STRATEGY 5.2Coordinate land use and transportation to support the safe andefficient movement of vehicles for passengers, goods and services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55v

FImplementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57GPerformance Measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66Appendix A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68Table A.1: Population, Dwelling Unit and Employment Projections forMetro Vancouver Subregions and Municipalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68Table A.2: Housing Demand Estimates by Tenure for Metro Vancouver Subregions (10 Year Estimate). . 69Table A.3: Rental Housing Demand Estimates by Household Income for Metro Vancouver Subregions(10 Year Estimate). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70Table A.4: Housing Demand Estimates by Tenure and Household Income for Metro VancouverSubregions and Municipalities (10 Year Estimate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71Appendix B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72Map B.1: Frequent Transit Network Concept (provided by TransLink) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72Map B.2: Major Road Network, Highways and Gateways (provided by TransLink) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73List of MapsMap 1:Metro Vancouver Municipalities and Electoral Area .Map 2:Regional Land Use Designations.Map 3:Urban Containment Boundary and General Urban Areas .Map 4:Urban Centres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20Map 5:Rural Areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22Map 6:Industrial and Mixed Employment Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8111528Map 7: Agricultural Areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31Map 8:Conservation and Recreation Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36Map 9:Regional Recreation Greenway Network .Map 10: Natural Features and Land Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39Map 11: Local Centres, Hospitals and Post-Secondary Institutions .Map 12: Special Study Areas and Sewerage Extension Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65List of FiguresFigure 1: The Metro Vancouver Sustainability Framework.Figure 2: Metro Vancouver’s Interconnected Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3Figure 3: How Land Use and Transportation Actions Address Climate Change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41Figure 4: Relationship Between the Regional Growth Strategy and Official Community Plans . . . . . . . . . 58List of TablesTable 1: Linkages Between Metro Vancouver Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4Table 2: Metro Vancouver Dwelling Unit and Employment Growth Targetsfor Urban Centres and Frequent Transit Development Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18Table 3: Guidelines for Urban Centres and Frequent Transit Development Areas .Table 4: Regional Growth Strategy Implementation Framework.vi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57

A The Sustainability Framework:Context for the Regional Growth StrategySince 2002 Metro Vancouver has formally putsustainability at the core of its operating andplanning philosophy and advanced its role as aleader in the attempt to make the region one whichis explicitly committed to a sustainable future. Thiscomprehensive endeavour became known as theSustainable Region Initiative, or more familiarly as the“SRI”. In 2008, Metro Vancouver’s Board adopted aSustainability Framework outlining its vision, mission,values, sustainability imperatives, and sustainabilityprinciples. Depicted in Figure 1, the SustainabilityFramework provides the foundation for MetroVancouver’s suite of plans, including the RegionalGrowth Strategy.1 1111

Figure 1The Metro Vancouver Sustainability FrameworkREGIONAL VISION The highest quality of life embracing cultural vitality, economic prosperity, social justice andcompassion, all nurtured in and by a beautiful and healthy natural environment. Achieved by an unshakeablecommitment to the well-being of current and future generations and the health of our planet, in everything we do.METRO VANCOUVER ROLE AND MISSION Serve the region and attain excellence in meeting these responsibilities.Plan for the future by developing and using an integrated system of plans. Facilitate collaboration with localgovernments and citizens.VALUES Integrity is our foundation. Passion for our work and pride in our accomplishments are our drivers.Respect for the public and compassion in our relationships are our guideposts.SUSTAINABILITY IMPERATIVES Have regard for local and global consequences and long-term impacts. Recognizeand reflect the interconnectedness and interdependence of systems. Be collaborative.SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Protect and enhance the natural environment. Provide for ongoing prosperity.Build community capacity and social cohesion.these are the foundation for Metro Vancouver’s three interconnected roles:ServicesPolicyPolitical ForumProviding services tolocal governments andtheir communitiesDeveloping and usingan integrated systemof plans; includessome regulatoryresponsibilitiesBuilding and facilitatingcollaborative processesamong governmentsand citizensDrinking WaterUTILITIESLiquid WasteSolid WasteParks and GreenwaysENVIRONMENTAir QualityClimate Change and EnergyEcological HealthAffordable HousingGrowth ManagementCultural Grantsand InformationLabour RelationsFoodRegional Emergency ManagementOther issues including:TransportationPolicingEconomic DevelopmentPortsProgress towards a sustainable region is measured byMETRICS, TARGETS and KEY DELIVERABLESwhich establish strategic priorities and key activities2PHYSICAL& SOCIALDEVELOPMENT

B Scope and Linkages to Other PlansThe Local Government Act establishes authority forthe Regional Growth Strategy. The Local GovernmentAct states that the purpose of a Regional GrowthStrategy is to “promote human settlement that issocially, economically and environmentally healthy andmakes efficient use of public facilities and services,land and other resources”.Table 1, Linkages Between Metro Vancouver Plans,summarizes major links where actions identified inother Metro Vancouver plans affect the RegionalGrowth Strategy, and conversely where actions inthis Strategy make a contribution to the goals of theother Metro Vancouver anceParks &GreenwaysWaterLiquidWasteGreenways Plan. Similarly, the strategies and actionsset out in the Regional Growth Strategy are intendedto contribute to improvements in air quality andreductions in greenhouse gas emissions, as calledfor in the Air Quality Management Plan, by directingurban development in ways that encourage energyefficient built form and vehicle travel patterns.FoodSystemFIGURE 2 Metro Vancouver’s Interconnected PlansMetro Vancouver’s Regional Growth Strategy is oneplan among a suite of interconnected managementplans developed around Metro Vancouver’sSustainability Framework. The Regional GrowthStrategy focuses on land use policies to guide thefuture development of the region and supportthe efficient provision of transportation, regionalinfrastructure and community services. In combinationwith other management plans, Metro Vancouver’sRegional Growth Strategy can help meet the region’spriorities and mandates and support the long-termcommitment to sustainability.The Regional Growth Strategy provides the land useframework for planning related to utilities (water, liquidwaste and solid waste), transportation, housing and airquality. Reciprocally, the Drinking Water, Liquid Wasteand Solid Waste Management Plans set the utilityframeworks within which the Regional Growth Strategymust be developed. Further, the housing elementsin the Regional Growth Strategy help implementthe Metro Vancouver Affordable Housing Strategywhile the environmental policies have importantlinkages with the Metro Vancouver Regional Parks andTransLink is the regional transportation authorityresponsible for planning, managing, and operatingthe regional transportation system. TransLink isrequired to provide a regional transportation systemthat supports Metro Vancouver’s Regional GrowthStrategy, air quality and greenhouse gas reductionobjectives, and the economic development of theregion. TransLink’s long range plan (maps shown asreference in Appendix B), sets out transportationstrategies for the road and transit networks as wellas other matters affecting the regional transportationsystem, in support of the Regional GrowthStrategy, provincial and regional environmentalobjectives, and the economic development of thetransportation service region. The Regional GrowthStrategy and regional transportation plans must bemutually reinforcing to be successful.If and when First Nations develop land managementplans, Metro Vancouver and the respective FirstNations and adjacent municipalities shouldendeavour to coordinate with each other to ensure,to the extent possible, that the Regional GrowthStrategy, municipal Official Community Plans, andFirst Nations’ land management plans are respectfuland supportive of each other.Other important partners include: the federalgovernment and the province, other authoritiesand agencies, as well as residents, non-profitorganizations and business associations. Thefederal government has jurisdiction and fundingresponsibilities for such matters as trade andtransportation facilities, such as the ports andairports, and the provincial government fortransportation planning, education and healthfacilities, which all have significant impacts onland use patterns. Both senior governments havefunding responsibilities for affordable housing.3

TABLE 1Linkages Between Metro Vancouver PlansAIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT PLANA compact urban area includingtransit-oriented developmentreduces greenhouse gas andcommon air contaminant emissionsfrom transportationReducing air emissions, includinggreenhouse gas emissions, iscomplementary to protecting theregion’s te communities promotewalking, cycling, transit, andreduced trip distances which reducegreenhouse gas and common aircontaminant emissionsProtecting forests and green spacethrough Rural / Agricultural /Conservation and Recreation areascontribute to better air quality andsequesters carbonDRINKING WATER MANAGEMENT PLANProvision of clean, safe drinking water isintegral to complete communities and asustainable economyINPUTProtected watersheds protect theregion’s conservation landsRegionalGROWTHStrategyA compact urban area generally usesinfrastructure more efficiently andplaces less demands on the overallsystemOUTPUTProtection of conservation landsreinforces protection of sources ofdrinking water (i.e. watersheds)INTEGRATED SOLID WASTE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLANCompact development makescollection of garbage, recycling, andcompost more efficientProvision of waste management servicesis integral to complete communitiesand a sustainable economyINPUTRegionalGROWTHStrategyOUTPUTMulti-unit dwellings generallyproduce less solid waste per capita,however, recycling rates from multiunit dwellings are significantly lowerthan single-detached unitsEncourages development thatwould be conducive to recoveringresources from the solid wastestream (e.g. areas suitable for districtenergy)4

Linkages Between Metro Vancouver PlansINTEGRATED LIQUID WASTE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLANProvision of liquid waste services isintegral to complete communities and asustainable economyCoordinates expansion of sewerageinfrastructure capacity with urbandevelopmentLimits development and expansionof sewerage service into rural,agricultural or conservation andrecreation areas which contributes toan effective and affordable serviceINPUTRegionalGROWTHStrategyOUTPUTEncourages integrated stormwatermanagement plans throughout theregionEncourages development thatwould be conducive to recoveringresources from the liquid wastestream (e.g. areas suitable for districtenergy)REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEM STRATEGYPromotes agricultural viability, especiallyfor food production, and supportsprotection of agricultural landsINPUTRegionalGROWTHStrategyOUTPUTProtects agricultural lands with anemphasis on food productionPARKS AND GREENWAYS PLANProtects and enhances recreation andconservation lands including naturalfeatures, biodiversity, and connectivitythroughout the regionINPUTGreenways and parks encourage walkingand cyclingRegionalGROWTHStrategyOUTPUTProtects Conservation andRecreation areas and supportspreservation and enhancementof active and passive parks andgreenways systems, as well as othernatural areas, regionally significanthabitat, and public recreationfacilitiesCompact urban growth reduces theecological footprint of development(per capita)AFFORDABLE HOUSING STRATEGYIncludes estimates of housing needsAffordable housing with a range ofhousing options is an essential part ofcomplete communitiesINPUTRegionalGROWTHStrategyRequires municipalities to prepareHousing Action PlansOUTPUTSupports higher densities andintensification which provide adiversity of (more affordable)housing optionsNote: Table for reference only, see section 6.13.25

C Challenges and ResponsesChallengesMetro Vancouver has experienced substantial growthover the past decades, adding more than onemillion people in a generation. Strong populationgrowth is likely to continue. The key challenge is toaccommodate growth in ways which both advancelivability and sustainability. To accomplish this, theRegional Growth Strategy addresses the followingissues:Accommodating Growth To AdvanceLivability and SustainabilityThe region is expected to continue to grow by over35,000 residents per year. Growth without sprawlimplies greater density of development. Carefullystructured, this can reduce congestion, improvethe economics of transportation infrastructure andpublic services, increase the viability of retail andservice centres, foster the creation of vibrant centresof culture and community activities, and maintain anattractive and diverse urban environment.Building Healthy, Complete CommunitiesAs the region’s population both ages and growsin number, providing affordable and appropriatehousing for residents at various stages of their lives isan ongoing challenge. Additionally, ensuring accessto the key elements of a healthy social community– shops, personal services, community activities,recreation, employment, culture, entertainment anda safe and attractive public environment – requirescareful planning primarily at the local scale, but also,to some extent, regionally.Supporting Economic ProsperityMetro Vancouver has a diversified economic base,including trade and commerce, manufacturing, goodsdistribution, professional services, tourism, educationand agriculture. The region connects with, and serves,a resource-rich province and has strong gatewaylinks to the North American and Asia-Pacific regions.The challenge for the Regional Growth Strategy isto ensure an adequate supply of space for industryand commerce throughout the region, locatedappropriately to their needs and in a manner thatsupports an efficient transportation system on whichthe economy depends.6Protecting the Natural EnvironmentMany of Metro Vancouver’s natural assets are ofnational and international significance. Managedproperly, they also provide the basics of life –breathable air, potable water and nutritious food.The challenge is to protect these assets for thebenefit of current and future generations in theface of a growing population and associated urbandevelopment and impacts which can threaten theirintegrity and quality.Responding to Climate Change Impacts andNatural Hazard RisksThe major natural hazard risks facing the MetroVancouver region include earthquakes, floods, andslope instability. Many of these are exacerbated bythe global threat of climate change. The challenge isto prepare for and mitigate regional natural hazardsand reduce the greenhouse gas emissions whichcan increase many of these risks, not only throughmitigation strategies, but also through land use andtransportation patterns generally.Protecting Agricultural Land to SupportFood ProductionComprising over 50,000 hectares of the region,agricultural lands are an important asset. Theheightened importance of producing fresh, regionallygrown food to meet economic, environmental,health and food security objectives reinforce theneed to protect the region’s rich agricultural lands.The challenge for the Regional Growth Strategy is toprotect the agricultural land base and to encourageits active use for food production.ResponsesTo respond to these challenges, the Regional GrowthStrategy sets out a series of strategies and actionsfor Metro Vancouver and member municipalitiesarranged under five key goals intended to achieve thedesired outcomes.

Create a CompactUrban AreaMetro Vancouver’s growthis concentrated in compactcommunities with access to arange of housing choic

Number 1136, 2010". This Bylaw may be cited as "Metro Vancouver 2040 Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw". READ A FIRST TIME this 12th day of November, 2010 . Amended by the Greater Vancouver Regional District Regional Growth Strategy Amendment Bylaw No. 1150, 2011, on October 28, 2011. iii

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metro manila marikina 61 east drive marikina heights marikina city metro manila . metro manila rizal tomas cladio san juan morong rizal metro manila rizal 101 national road muzon taytay rizal . metro manila rizal lt 2 tagumpay st san jose montalban rizal metro

Table 2 DRCOG 2040 Population and Employment Projections for Study Area Districts Source: DRCOG 2040 RTP. Observations The Districts in the study area have a 2015 population of 197,100, which is projected to grow to 319,700 in 2040. Employment in the Districts in 2015 is approximately 145,500 jobs and is projected to increase to 227,700 in 2040.

Flair 8134 December 30 Vancouver Toronto 12-18 WestJet 127 December 30 Calgary Vancouver 1-6 WestJet 3277 December 30 Vancouver Prince George 13-19 Air Canada 103 December 29 Toronto Vancouver 20-23 Air Canada 114 December 29 Vancouver Toronto 20-26 Air Canad

with the City of Vancouver's Director of Legal Services and the Greater Vancouver Water District (GVWD) Commissioner about a Capilano Water Main Agreement, and with Parks Canada about the Federal approval processes required for the project. Constructed in the 1930's, the existing Metro Vancouver water main within Stanley Park,

households in the Metro Vancouver Region is the third in a series of surveys. The 2012 survey revisits the 1990 "Choosing our Future" program of the Greater Vancouver Regional District and the 1973 Vancouver Urban Futures survey carried out as part of the Livable Region Plan. All

Artificial intelligence: opportunities and implications for the future of decision making. 9 November 2016. Big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning and data protection 20170904 Version: 2.2 7 This may not sound very different from standard methods of data analysis. But the difference is that AI programs don’t linearly analyse data in the way they were originally programmed .