Prosecutors In State Courts, 2007 - Statistical Tables

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U.S. Department of JusticeOffice of Justice ProgramsBureau of Justice Statistics2007 National Census of State Court ProsecutorsDecember 2011, NCJ 234211Steven W. Perry and Duren Banks, BJS StatisticiansIn 2007, 2,330 state prosecutors’ offices servedstate judicial districts in the United States. Theoffices reported a total estimated budget of 5.8billion in 2007 and employed nearly 78,000 attorneys,investigators, paralegals, and support staff. Stateprosecutors closed 2.9 million cases charged as feloniesin state courts in 2007, approximately 94 cases for eachprosecuting attorney on staff.The 2007 Census of State Court Prosecutors markedthe second BJS survey of all prosecutors’ offices in theUnited States. The first census, conducted in 2001,included the 2,341 offices in operation at that time.The second census included the 2,330 state courtprosecutors’ offices operating in 2007. Neither censusincluded offices of municipal attorneys or countyattorneys, who primarily operate in courts of limitedjurisdiction.State court prosecutors serve in the executivebranch of state governments and handle felonycases in state courts of general jurisdiction. By law,these prosecutors are afforded broad discretion indetermining who is charged with an offense andwhether a case goes to trial. The chief prosecutor, alsoreferred to as the district attorney, county attorney,commonwealth attorney, or state’s attorney, representsTable 1State prosecutors’ offices, by population served, 2007Population servedAll officesFull-time offices serving a population of—1,000,000 or more250,000 to 999,999100,000 to 249,99999,999 or lessPart-time .114.659.614.8Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.the state in criminal cases and is answerable to thepublic as an elected or appointed public official.The Office of the United States Attorney for theDistrict of Columbia is the only federal prosecutorincluded in the census. This unique office isresponsible for prosecution of serious local crimescommitted in the District and also for prosecution offederal cases, whether criminal or civil.These tables describe the operational andadministrative functions of the offices that prosecutecriminal offenses in state courts, including felonycaseloads, office budgets and staffing, and prosecutionof particular criminal offenses in 2007.Tables and FiguresTable 1. State prosecutors’ offices, by populationserved, 2007Table 8. Prosecution of specific felony offenses, bypopulation served, 2007Table 2. State prosecutors’ offices budget and staffing,by population served, 2007Table 9. State court prosecutors’ office use of DNAevidence, 2007Table 3. Percent of persons employed in stateprosecutors’ offices, 2007Table 10. Type of disposition information reported todata repositories by state court prosecutors’ offices,2007Table 4. Felony cases closed by state prosecutors’offices, by population served, 2007Table 5. Tenure and salary of chief prosecutors, bypopulation served, 2007Table 6. Assistant prosecutors’ minimum andmaximum salary in state prosecutors’ offices, bypopulation served, 2007Table 7. State prosecutors’ offices receiving threats andpercent with staff who carry firearms, by populationserved, 2007Bureau of Justice Statistics · Statistical TablesProsecutors in State Courts,2007 - Statistical TablesTable 11. Standard errors of critical variables, by datasource, 2007Figure 1. Average assistant prosecutors salary, byexperience and population served, 2007Figure 2. Prosecutors’ offices handling cases involvingchildren and elderly victims or school crime, 2007Figure 3. Type of disposition information reported todata repositories by state court prosecutors’ offices, 2007BJS

Summary findingsPopulations served In 2007, 2,330 prosecutors’ offices across the United Statesserved districts with populations ranging in size from 500to 9.9 million residents (not shown in table).Felony cases processing and dispositions Prosecutors’ offices reported closing 2.9 million casescharged as felonies in 2007 through convictions, acquittals,dismissals, or other dispositions (table 4). Most (74%) prosecutors’ offices served districts with apopulation of less than 100,000 residents. Fifteen percentof prosecutors’ offices were part-time offices with no fulltime chief prosecutor (table 1). Offices in districts with more than 1 million residentsclosed an average of 17,652 felony cases in 2007. Officesserving jurisdictions with 250,000 to 999,999 residentsclosed an average of 4,431 felony cases. State prosecutors’ districts (85%) generally correspondwith county boundaries. Alaska, Delaware, Connecticut,and Rhode Island had a single prosecutors’ office for theentire state (not shown in table). In 2007, prosecuting attorneys in offices in districts with100,000 to 249,999 residents closed an average of 121felony cases each. The average caseload per prosecutingattorney across all full-time offices was 94 felony cases.Operating budgets and staffing levels The total operating budget ( 5.8 billion) of stateprosecutors’ offices in 2007 decreased by 5% from the 6.1billion budget for 2001 (inflation-adjusted to 2007 dollars)(not shown in table). The average operating budget for full-time prosecutors’offices in 2007 ranged from 526,000 for those servingfewer than 100,000 residents to 49.3 million injurisdictions serving more than 1 million. The averagepart-time office’s budget was 157,000 (table 2). State prosecutors’ offices employed almost 78,000 full-timeequivalent (FTE) staff in 2007.* The nearly 25,000 FTE assistant prosecutors employed in2007 represented a 7% increase from the number reportedin 2001 (not shown in table). Prosecutors’ offices serving populations of 1 million ormore employed an average of 535 FTE staff, including 187assistant prosecutors, 31 supervisory attorneys, 16 victimadvocates, 51 investigators, and 183 support staff. In full-time offices serving fewer than 100,000 residents,on average, offices included one chief prosecutor, threeassistant prosecutors, one victim advocate, one legalservices staff, one investigator, and three support staff. Assistant prosecutors comprised 32% of the total staffin prosecutors’ offices in 2007. Support staff, includingadministrative and clerical staff, accounted for 33% of thetotal staff (table 3).*Full-time equivalent (FTE) is a computed statistic calculated by dividingthe total number of hours worked by part-time employees by the standardnumber of hours for a full-time employee (40 hours per week) and thenadding the resulting quotient to the number of full-time employees.2 The budgeted cost per felony case closed, calculated as thetotal office budget in 2007 divided by the number of felonycases closed, was 2,792 in offices serving 1 million ormore residents. Prosecutors’ offices reported 2.2 million convictions forcases charged as felonies in 2007. Prosecutors’ offices serving 1 million or more residents hadan average of 11,952 felony case convictions, while fulltime offices serving populations of less than 100,000 hadan average of 315 felony case convictions. Felony cases adjudicated through jury verdicts were rareacross state prosecutors’ offices, accounting for an averageof 3% of all felony case dispositions and 2% of dispositionslitigated by offices serving 1 million or more residents.Tenure and salary The average annual salary of a chief prosecutor in 2007was 98,000, with mean salaries ranging from 165,700 forchief prosecutors in the largest offices to less than 45,000in part-time offices (table 5). In 2007, the average tenure of a chief prosecutor was9 years. Sixty-four percent of chief prosecutors had been in officefor more than 5 years, and 38% had been in office for morethan 10 years. The longest serving prosecutor had been inthe position for 42 years. The average annual salary for assistant prosecutors rangedfrom 33,460 for entry-level assistant prosecutors in parttime offices to 108,434 for assistant prosecutors with 6 ormore years of experience in offices serving jurisdictions of1 million or more residents (table 6).Prosecutors in State Courts, 2007 - Statistical Tables

In offices serving 1 million or more residents, the averageassistant prosecutor’s salary started at 51,354 for thosewith no experience and at 73,010 for those with 6 years ormore experience, a difference of 42% (figure 1). More than 90% of offices in districts serving 1 millionresidents reported prosecuting felony offenses involvinguse of the internet for child exploitation, elder abuse, gangrelated violence, and school violence involving firearms. In offices serving between 250,000 and 999,999 residents,the average assistant prosecutor’s salary started at 47,580for those with no experience and at 65,400 for those with6 years or more experience, a difference of 37%. In 2007, part-time offices and those serving less than100,000 residents were less likely than offices serving largerpopulations to handle cases involving children and elderlyvictims or school crime (figure 2). In full-time offices serving less than 100,000 residents, theaverage assistant prosecutor’s salary started at 42,380 forthose with no experience and at 53,113 for those with 6years or more experience, a difference of 25%. The percentage of offices prosecuting cases involving elderabuse (55%) or child exploitation using the internet (57%)was about 50% higher than the percentage prosecutingcases of school violence involving a firearm (27%). In part-time offices the average assistant prosecutor’ssalary started at 33,460 for those with no experience andat 36,481 for those with 6 years or more experience, adifference of 9%.Threats against prosecutors’ offices In 2007, almost half (47%) of prosecutors’ offices hadreceived a written threat, a threatening phone call, a faceto-face threat, or had staff who were victims of battery orassault (table 7). About 26% of offices reported receiving written threats,while 32% received threatening phone calls and 29%received face-to-face verbal threats. About 3% of officesreported that one of their staff had been a victim of batteryor assault. Most offices (89%) serving populations of 1 million ormore received a threat during 2007, as did most offices(69%) in jurisdictions with 250,000 to 999,999 residents. More than two-thirds of offices serving populationsof 100,000 or more reported that the chief prosecutor,an assistant prosecutor, or a staff investigator carried afirearm. The percentage of offices reporting that a staff investigatorcarried a firearm (34%) was greater than the percentagereporting that the chief prosecutor (21%) or assistantprosecutors (18%) carried one. The percentage of prosecutors’ staff that reported carryingfirearms has remained steady since 2001. The majority (58%) of offices that had received a threatreported that office staff carried a firearm, compared to37% of offices that had not received a threat (not shown intable). About 6% of offices serving less than 250,000 residents(including part-time offices) prosecuted police officers forexcessive force, while 55% of offices serving populationslarger than 1 million prosecuted such cases.Use of DNA evidence in felony cases In 2007, most prosecutors’ offices (75%) used DNAevidence in plea negotiations or in felony trials (table 9). The majority (84%) of prosecutors’ offices reported thatthey had submitted DNA evidence to a laboratory foranalysis. Most (80%) offices used forensic laboratoriesoperated by the state government. More than half (60%) of state prosecutors’ offices thathad submitted evidence to a laboratory in 2007 reportedexcessive delays in receiving the DNA results.Case disposition information reported to repositories A large majority of prosecutors’ offices reported casedispositions to either federal, state, or local repositories in2007 (table 10). Most offices reported data on felony convictions (93%)and misdemeanor convictions (80%) to data repositories,while about 30% reported data on court determination ofmental status (figure 3). Fewer than a third of the offices reported dispositions forcommitment to mental institutions (31%). Among the offices that did not provide final casedisposition information to federal, state, or localrepositories, about 72% indicated another agency wasresponsible for submitting this information (not shown intable).Specific felony offenses In 2007, the majority of prosecutors’ offices reportedprosecuting felony cases involving methamphetamineproduction (71%), child exploitation involving the internet(58%), or elder abuse (55%) (table 8).December 20113

Table 2State prosecutors’ offices budget and staffing, by population served, 2007All officesResident population served (thousands)299,567Budget (thousands) 5,807,914Budget per population servedFull-time equivalent personnel*Chief prosecutorAssistant prosecutorsCivil attorneysSupervisory attorneysManaging attorneysVictim advocatesLegal servicesInvestigatorsSupport 787,31125,7591,4511,000,000 or moreMean Median2,0251,470 49,291 35,981 23 2153511871231131635511836Full-time offices serving a population of—250,000 to 999,999 100,000 to 249,999Mean MedianMean Median496445158150 9,998 7,000 2,327 1,809 19 15 14 360391121213231313311101131210099,999 or lessMean Median3629 526 336 17 1310130001113081200010030Part-time officesMean Median137 157 98 18 143110000001021000000010Note: Table is based on operating budgets, not actual expenditures. Data were missing for 5.5% (128) of offices surveyed. Total budget, total staff, chief prosecutor,and assistant prosecutor values were imputed using data from 2001 and 2007 Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, stratified by population served and state. SeeMethodology for details on imputation procedures.*Full-time equivalent (FTE) is a computed statistic calculated by dividing the total number of hours part-time employees worked by the standard number of hours for afull-time employee (40 hours per week) and then adding the resulting quotient to the number of full-time employees. Statistics for job categories were imputed usingmean values for valid data from the 2007 Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, stratified by population served.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2001 and 2007.Table 3Personnel employed in state prosecutors’ offices, 2007Job categoriesaTotalSupport staffAssistant prosecutorsInvestigatorsVictim advocatesLegal servicesSupervisory/managing AttorneysChief prosecutorCivil attorneysOtherEstimated total full-time equivalent staffPercent of total full-timeequivalent personnel inprosecutors’ offices nationwideb100%33%32965732277,927Note: Table is based on operating budgets, not actual expenditures. Datawere missing for 5.5% (128) of offices surveyed. Total budget, total staff, chiefprosecutor, and assistant prosecutor values were imputed using data from 2001and 2007 Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, stratified by populationserved and state. See Methodology for details on imputation procedures.aStatistics for job categories were imputed using mean values for valid data from2007 Census of State Court Prosecutors Offices, stratified by population served.bFull-time equivalent (FTE) is a computed statistic calculated by dividing thetotal number of hours part-time employees worked by the standard number ofhours for a full-time employee (40 hours per week) and then adding the resultingquotient to the number of full-time employees.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2001 and 2007.4Prosecutors in State Courts, 2007 - Statistical Tables

Table 4Felony cases closed by state prosecutor’s offices, by population served, 2007Felony casesTotal closed—Per officeMeanaMedianPer prosecuting attorneybMeancMedianBudgeted cost per case closedMeandMedianAll offices2,906,795Total felony jury trial verdictsMeaneMedianPercent closed by jury verdictMeanfMedianTotal felony cases convictedMeangMedian1,000,000 or more759,057Full-time offices serving a population of—250,000 to 999,999 100,000 to 249,999934,884622,07399,999 or less555,050Part-time 42740022610332947581828777121102106739942 1,998 1,764 2,792 2,376 2,256 2,140 1,276 1,307 1,317 1,667 1,525 383151753%130,5918825Note: Based on imputed data from 2001 and 2007 Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, stratified by population served and state. See Methodology for details onimputation procedures.aCalculated using the total number of felony cases divided by the total number of offices.bIncludes full-time equivalent positions of prosecutors who carry a caseload (chief and assistant prosecutors and supervisors).cCalculated using the total number of felony cases divided by the total number of litigating attorneys (chief and assistant prosecutors and supervisors).dCalculated using the total budget divided by the total number of felony cases.eCalculated using total number of jury trial verdicts divided by the total number of offices.fCalculated using total number of felony cases closed by jury verdict divided by the total number of felony cases closed in 2007.gCalculated using the total number of cases convicted divided by the total number of offices.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2001 and 2007.December 20115

Table 5Tenure and salary of chief prosecutors in state prosecutors' offices, by population served, 2007Full-time offices serving a population of—Chief prosecutorAll offices 1,000,000 or more 250,000 to 999,999 100,000 to 249,999SalaryaMean 98,024 165,732 138,017 121,771Median 101,700 158,000 139,000 119,800TenurebMean9.4 yr.9.5 yr.9.8 yr.9.6 yr.Median7.07.68.07.2Percent of chief prosecutors with tenure of—Less than 1 1611–2025352830More than 20125141399,999 or lessPart-time offices 96,956 99,750 44,981 42,6609.0 yr.7.010.5 yr.7.02%18152924115%219222419aValues for chief prosecutors’ salary were imputed using valid data from the 2001 and 2007 Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, stratified by population served andstate. See Methodology for further information on imputation procedures.bData on the tenure of the chief prosecutor were missing for 7.4% of offices surveyed. All percentages were calculated from reporting offices only.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2001 and 2007.Table 6Assistant prosecutors’ average minimum and maximum salary in state prosecutors’ offices, by population served, 2007SalaryEntry level assistant prosecutorMinimumMaximumAssistant prosecutor with1 to 5 years experienceMinimumMaximumAssistant prosecutor with6 or more years experienceMinimumMaximum1,000,000 or moreMeanMedianFull-time offices serving a population of—250,000 to 999,999100,000 to 249,999MeanMedianMeanMedian99,999 or lessMeanMedianPart-timeMeanMedian 51,354 64,517 51,378 58,013 47,580 57,759 46,704 51,707 44,007 55,263 43,000 48,000 42,380 50,050 42,931 46,000 33,460 36,712 34,307 39,000 59,671 82,227 56,478 79,296 53,542 68,993 51,604 65,000 48,930 62,074 47,000 57,585 45,921 55,248 46,000 53,134 33,645 36,391 37,550 40,691 73,010 68,609 108,434 111,987 65,400 94,257 64,000 90,796 57,056 83,139 57,000 79,566 53,113 64,932 54,000 65,000 36,481 42,473 40,000 44,990Note: Based on data from prosecutors’ offices that responded. Salary data were missing for about 50% of offices.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.6Prosecutors in State Courts, 2007 - Statistical Tables

Figure 1Assistant prosecutors’ average minimum salary, by experience and population served, 2007Population served 51,3541,000,000or more 59,671 73,010 47,580250,000 to999,999 53,542 65,400 44,007100,000 to249,999 48,930 57,056 42,380 45,92199,999or lessEntry salary(no experience)1 to 5 yearsminimum experience 53,113 33,460 33,645 36,481Part-time010,00020,00030,0006 years or moreminimum experience40,000Mean salary50,00060,00070,00080,000Note: Based on data from all prosecutors’ offices that responded. Salary data were missing for about 50% of offices.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.Table 7State prosecutors’ offices receiving threats and percent with staff who carry firearms, by population served, 2007Type of threat/staff carrying firearmAny threat*Written threatThreatening phone callFace-to-face verbal threatBattery/assaultAny staff carry firearm*Chief prosecutor carries a firearmAssistant prosecutor carries a firearmStaff investigator carries a firearmFull-time offices serving a population of—Part-timeAll offices1,000,000 or more 250,000 to 999,999 100,000 to 249,99999,999 or lessofficesNumber Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Note: Based on data from all prosecutors’ offices that responded. Data were missing for 12% of offices.*Detail adds to more than total due to multiple responses.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.Table 8Prosecution of specific felony offenses, by population served, 2007Type of felony offenseMethamphetamine productionUse of internet for child exploitationElder abuseGang-related violenceSchool violence involving firearmsPolice use of excessive forceTerrorism/homeland securityHuman traffickingAll offices71.1%57.555.233.627.29.23.93.81,000,000 or more87.5%97.595.095.092.555.017.540.0Full-time offices serving a population of—250,000 to 999,999100,000 to 9.614.24.84.411.62.699,999 or .321.18.38.72.03.01.7Note: Based on data from all prosecutors’ offices that responded. Data were missing for 15% of offices.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.December 20117

Figure 2Percent of prosecutors’ offices handling cases involvingelder abuse, use of internet for child exploitation, and schoolviolence involving firearms, by population served, 2007All offices5558279598931,000,000or more87250,000to 999,9996180100,000to 249,9994499,999or less21Part-timeoffices90Use of internet forchild exploitationSchool violenceinvolving firearms252040Percent85Elder abuse525220926080Table 9State court prosecutors' office use of DNA evidence, 2007Type of DNA useDNA evidence submitted to any laboratory for analysisaFBI forensic laboratoryState forensic laboratoryLocal government forensic laboratoryPrivately operated forensic laboratoryUsed DNA evidence in plea negotiations or in felony trialsProblems associated with use of DNA evidencebImproper evidence collection by policeInconclusive DNA resultsExcessive delay in getting DNA results from laboratoryDifficulty in getting DNA results admitted in court as evidenceAuthorized to search and submit DNAbConvicted offender databaseForensic database containing profiles from unsolved 2.547.8%29.2Note: Detail adds to more than total due to multiple responses to the survey.aBased on data from all prosecutors’ offices that responded. Data are missing for15% of offices.bBased on offices that submitted evidence to any laboratory.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.100Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.Table 10Type of disposition information reported to data repositories, by state court prosecutors’ offices, 2007Type of repository and caseAll officesType of repositoryAnya56%Federal9State50Local26Type of case disposition information reportedbFelony convictions93%Guilty pleas82Misdemeanor convictions80Felony acquittals79Dismissal of charges by court77Misdemeanor acquittals67Sex offender registration requirements61Indictments56Probation and parole violations54Declination to prosecute47Protection orders43Commitment to mental institutions31Court determination of mental status301,000,000 or moreFull-time offices serving a population of—250,000 to 999,999 100,000 to 249,99999,999 or 6255554744293096%799078747260435732392120Note: Based on data from all prosecutors’ offices that responded. Data are missing for 15% of offices.aDetail adds to more than total due to multiple responses.bAnalysis restricted to offices that provided case disposition information to any repository.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.8Prosecutors in State Courts, 2007 - Statistical Tables

Figure 3State court prosecutors’ offices that report data to repositories, by type of data reported, 2007Court determination of mental status30Commitment to mental institutions31Protection orders43Declination to prosecute47Probation and parole violations54Indictments56Sex offender registration61Misdemeanor acquittals67Dismissal of charges by court77Felony acquittals79Misdemeanor convictions80Guilty pleas82Felony convictions9302040Percent6080100Note: Data on participation in record repositories were missing for 15% of prosecutors’ offices. Percentages based on valid data only.Source: BJS, Census of State Court Prosecutors’ Offices, 2007.December 20119

MethodologyThe 2007 National Census of State Court Prosecutors (NCSP07) included 2,330 chief prosecutors in the United States thathandled felony cases in state courts of general jurisdiction.State court prosecutors serve districts determined by eachstate’s court structure.Data collection. The Urban Institute collected the data onbehalf of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). The NationalDistrict Attorneys Association helped review the datacollection instrument, provided their national directory ofdistrict attorneys, and provided a medium for advertisementvia their bi-monthly publication, The Prosecutor. TheUrban Institute conducted the collection through a mailedquestionnaire and a web automated instrument. The NCSP07 form is available on the BJS website at www.bjs.gov.Response rates. The NCSP-07 had an overall responserate of 95.6% from the 2,330 prosecutors’ offices across thenation. After the initial mailings, BJS followed up to obtain areturned survey from each prosecutors’ office. The follow-upprocess involved phone calls, email, fax communications,a second mailing of questionnaires, and follow-up letters.Completed surveys were received from 1,303 (56%)prosecutors’ offices. Follow-up telephone calls, emails, andfaxes resulted in an additional 924 (40%) offices providinga sufficient partially completed form, to make a final totalof 2,227 responses from the eligible 2,330. A total of 4.4%(103) of the offices either did not respond (47) or directlyrefused participation (56). Among the 103 court prosecutors’offices that did not respond, 84% were in districts that servedpopulations of less than 250,000.Calculated variables. Several variables were calculatedusing reported and imputed data collected from the surveyinstrument. Full-time equivalent (FTE) is a computed statisticcalculated by dividing the total number of hours parttime employees worked by the standard number of hoursfor a full-time employee (40 hours per week), and thenadding the resulting quotient to the number of fulltime employees. (See U.S. Census Bureau GovernmentEmployment, 1997, at http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/meta/long 58632.htm.) Attorneys carrying a caseload (supervisory attorneys,assistant prosecutors, and chief prosecutors) were includedas FTE prosecuting attorneys. Managing attorneys who didnot prosecute cases were excluded. Cases closed per prosecuting attorney was calculated foreach office by dividing the number of felony cases closedby the office in 2007 by the number of FTE prosecutingattorneys on staff in 2007. The budgeted cost per felony case closed was calculated foreach office by dividing the total office budget in 2007 bythe number of felony cases closed. The proportion of felony cases closed by jury verdict wascalculated for each office by dividing the number of felonycases closed by jury verdict by the number of felony casesclosed in 2007.Data ImputationsBJS used a combination of hot and cold deck approachesto impute values for nine critical variables. These variablesincluded the number of chief prosecutors, number offull-time assistant prosecutors, number of full-time staff,number of part-time staff, annual salary of chief prosecutor,total office operating budget, number of felony cases closed,number of felony cases resulting in a conviction, and theTable 11Standard errors of critical variables, by data source, 2007ImputedCritical variableChief prosecutorFull-time assistant prosecutorsFull-time staffPart-time staffFelony cases closedFelony cases resulting in a convictionFelony cases tried before a juryAnnual salary of chief prosecutorTotal office operating ,074.36576863.1753527.65313 101,273378 1,553,999Reported data were*—Provided by respondentStandardStandarderror of mean NumberMeanerror of 251,752958.6467.462.701,79432.602.76 2,3171,968 97,507 865 223,3721,952 2,674,437 248,044All reported dataStandardNumberMeanerror of 62.212,281 98,024 8112,330 2,492,667 211,098Note: Excludes data for which no suitable donor for imputation was available.*A suitable

of 100,000 or more reported that the chief prosecutor, an assistant prosecutor, or a staff investigator carried a firearm. The percentage of offices reporting that a staff investigator carried a firearm (34%) was greater than the percentage reporting that the chief prosecutor (21%) or assistant prosecutors (18%) carried one.

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