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A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago Region1Volunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)EVERGREENSHRUBS:GROUP 1.LEAVES ARENEEDLES orSCALES.1 Juniperus horizontalisTRAILING JUNIPER: 2 Juniperus communisCOMMON JUNIPER:Plants have a creeping habit; some leaves are needles but most are Erect shrub or tree (up to 3 m tall); needles whorled on stem;scales with a whitish coat; fruit a bluish-whitish berry-like cone; fruit a bluish or black berry-like cone; grows only in dunes/bluffsmale cones on separate plants; grows in sandy soils.bordering Lake Michigan.DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 2.LEAVES COMPOUND(more than one leafletper stalk).STEMS ARMED.3 Rosa setigeraILLINOIS ROSE: 4 Rosa palustrisSWAMP ROSE:Mature plant with long-arching stems; sparse prickles; leafletsUpright shrub; stems very thorny; leaflets 5-7; sepals fall fromusually 3, but sometimes 5; styles (female pollen tube) fused into mature fruit; fruit smooth, red berry-like hips; grows in wet anda column; stipules narrow to tip.open ditches, bogs, and swamps.5 Rosa carolinaPASTURE ROSE:Upright shrub; leaflets 5-7; stipules flat and pointed; flowers are solitary; buds and fruitsw/ glandular hairs; grows in dry habitat.6 Rosa blandaEARLY WILD ROSE:Stems mostly smooth; prickles may be present at plant base; leaflets 5-7 with soft hairy underside; flowers are solitary and bloomstarting mid-May.

A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago Region2Volunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)7 Rosa multifloraMULTIFLORA ROSE: 8 Rubus hispidusSWAMP DEWBERRY:Non-native, invasive; arching, prickly stems; leaflets 7-9; stipules Plant ankle-high with bristly trailing stems; leaflets 3, small ( 5 cm long); leaves evergreen; ripefeathered; many white flowers; styles fused into column; compare fruit black.with R. setigera.9 Rubus flagellarisCOMMON DEWBERRY: 10 Rubus odoratusPURPLE FLOWERING RASPBERRY:Plant ankle-high and trailing; large prickles; leaflets 3 (usually)Leaves maple-like, simple, 3-5 lobed with toothed margins; large leaves ( 26 cm long) and flowersto 5; terminal leaflet with short stem and stipules; leaf undersides (3-6 cm wide); purple flowers; fruit red, leaving a white knob (receptacle) when picked. In contrast,not velvety; mature fruit black.blackberries and dewberries detach from plant w/ receptacle inside in the fruit.11 Rubus occidentalisBLACK RASPBERRY: 12 Rubus allegheniensisCOMMON BLACKBERRY: stems angular and dangerously thorny; stout pricklesStems and leaf undersides have a whitish coat; new stems have soft prickles, but otherwise pricklesare stout, hooked; leaflets usually 3 (palmately compound if 5); leaf margin doubly toothed; fruit purple- have broad base; 3-7 leaflets palmately compound; leaf and flowerstalks w/ glandular hairs; fruit black.black. A similar species, Rubus idaeus strigosus (red raspberry) has red fruit and lacks whitish coat.

3A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago RegionVolunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)doubly toothedleaf margin13 Rubus pensilvanicusYANKEE BLACKBERRY: 14 Xanthoxylum americanumPRICKLY ASH:Stems with straight spines; leaflets 5-7; leaf undersides softlyMember of the citrus family with aromatic leaves; branches with paired spines; 5-11 leaflets; growshairy and margins toothed or doubly toothed; fruit black.in dry-mesic woods.DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 3.LEAVES COMPOUND(more than one leafletper stalk).STEMS WITHOUTTHORNS or SPINES. 15 Potentilla fruticosa (Dasiphora floribunda) 16 Amorpha canescensSHRUBBY CINQUEFOIL: leaflets 5-7, pinnately compound;leaf margins roll outward; in our region grows only in fens andcoastal wetlands.17 Staphylea trifoliaLEAD PLANT:Shrub up to waist high; plant has grayish appearance; grows inprairies. Comparatively, A. fruticosa (indigo bush) is an overheadshrub with hairless leaf undersides and grows in wetlands andfloodplains.BLADDERNUT:Branches greenish striped with white, corky spots; leaflets pointed; terminal leaflet on a long-stalk, while lateral leaflets barelystalked; flower clusters at leaf nodes drooping; fruit a 3-lobed papery, inflated capsule.18 Sambucus canadensisELDERBERRY: 5-9 pinnately compound leaflets; twigs have white pith;large, spreading inflorescence w/white flowers; fruit is dark purple.

A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago Region4Volunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)19 Ptelea trifoliataWAFER ASH:Three leaflets ( 15 cm long each); terminal leaflet largest andshort-branched; fruit odor of hops; plant grows in sand dunesand bedrock soil. P. trifoliata mollis (downy wafer ash) has fuzzyleaves and aromatic flowers attracting early evening moths.21 Rhus aromatica20 Aralia nudicaulisWILD SARSAPARILLA:Plant barely knee high; dies back to ground each year; purplish cast to foliage, especially in springand fall; leaves pinnately compound; leaflets large ( 13 cm long); leaf margins toothed; flowersclumped on 3 spheres. A. racemosa (spikenard) reaches several meters tall and has large, spreadingleaves; fruit reminiscent of rootbeer flavor.DWARF FRAGRANT SUMAC:Pungent smell when bruised; 3 small leaflets ( 4 cm long); leaf margin lobed and soft hairy; fruitred and hairy; primarily found in sand prairies and dunes, though also bedrock exposures. Distinguished from the highly allergenic climbing vine, Rhus radicans (poison ivy), which hasa more angular leaf margin and white berries.23 Rhus copallina latifolia22 Rhus typhinaSTAGHORN SUMAC:Branches covered in tan, velvety hairs; leaflets 13-27 with toothedmargins; fruits red and densely hairy.SHINING SUMAC: 24 Rhus glabraSMOOTH SUMAC:Branches covered in ashy, soft hairs; leaflets 9-23 with smoothBranches with whitish coat and not hairy; leaflets 11-13 with toothed margins; fruits red and denselymargins; leaf axis winged; fruits red and densely hairy; foundhairy.only in sandy soil.

5A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago RegionVolunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 4.LEAVES SIMPLE (oneleaf per stalk).LEAVES OPPOSITE.25 Rhus vernix (Toxicodendron vernix)POISON SUMAC:Causes skin rash in most people; bark with smooth whitish coat, but without hairs; leaflets 9-13;leaflets elliptical with smooth margins; terminal leaflet longer stalked than lateral leaflets; fruitsgrayish-white on red drooping stalk; grows in bogs.LEAF MARGIN EN- 26 Image illustrates the abilityTIRE (no teeth).of dogwood (Cornus sp.) leavesto hold together by “strings” inthe leaf veins when torn.27 Cornus racemosaGRAY DOGWOOD: 28 Cornus obliquaSILKY or BLUE-FRUITED DOGWOOD:Freely sprouts from roots; branches gray with brown pith; young Branches reddish-brown to grayish with orange-brown pith; young growth hairy; leaves with arcingtwigs reddish; leaves with 3-4 pairs of arcing veins;veins; leaf underside pale with flattened hairs; fruits cobalt blue.inflorescence as broad as high; fruits white on red branches.29 Cornus stolonifera (C. sericea)RED-OSIER DOGWOOD: 30 Cephalanthus occidentalis BUTTONBUSH:Forms thickets; branches dark red with white pith; leaves with 5-7 pairs of viens and pale, oftenWhorled leaves rounded at base w/ glossy upper surface; flowershairy undersides; fruits white or grayish. C. rugosa (round-leaved dogwood) has greenishin white spheres, blooming in July; frequented by butterflies.branches with white pith, leaves with wooly undersides and pale blue fruits.

6A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago RegionVolunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)31 Decodon verticillatusSWAMP LOOSESTRIFE:Almost always growing in shallow water; lower stems spongy; leaves opposite, whorled; flowersmagenta, 2.5 cm wide.33 Mitchella repensPARTRIDGE BERRY:Plant has creeping habit; leaves a rounded heart shape with whitemidrib; flowers are paired: 2 white tubular flowers w/ fused ovary;petals hairy; fruit red berry with 2 indentations.36 Lonicera prolifera32 Hypericum kalmianumKALM’S ST. JOHN’SWORT: exfoliating bark; leaves oblong, bluish-green, and dotted withglands; flowers yellow with many stamen; fruit a beaked capsule;found most often in wet sand near Lake Michigan.34 Symphoricarpos albusSNOWBERRY:Branches sparsely, soft hairy; leaves rounded; style not exceedingpetals ( 3 mm long); fruit bright white, often persisting into fall.S. occidentalis (wolfberry) style exceedes petals ( 3 mm) andfruit is greenish-white.35 Lonicera dioicaRED HONEYSUCKLE: similar toL. prolifera but more common nearLake Michigan, leaves thicker, andflowers tinged purple or brick-red.YELLOW HONEYSUCKLE: 37 Lonicera maackiiAMUR HONEYSUCKLE:Sprawling vine; uppermost leaves fused into disk; lower leaves have a stalk; leaves w/ whitish coat; Non-native, invasive; upright shrub; leaf tip pointed; leaf marginciliate; flowers white, fading yellow. A similar invasive,yellow flowers in clumps.L. tatarica (Tatarian honeysuckle) differs w/ early spring leafemergence, brittle twigs, and varying pink flowers.

A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago Region7Volunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 5.LEAVES SIMPLE (oneleaf per stalk).LEAVES OPPOSITE.LEAF MARGIN38 Diervilla lonicera DWARF HONEYSUCKLE: 39 Euonymus alatusWINGED EUONYMOUS:TOOTHED or LOBED. Plant barely 1 m tall; arching stems; leaves pointed, sometimes Non-native, planted extensively; branches are corky-winged;hairy on lower surface; flowers yellow-red with spreading petals;fruit a dry, long-pointed vase shape with hairy tips.scarlet fall leaf color.40 Euonymus atropurpureusWAHOO: 41 Euonymus obovatusRUNNING STRAWBERRY BUSH:Fall leaf color dull red; flowers 4-parted, branching from leaf base;Plants trailing on ground, less than 10 cm tall; flowers 5-parted; fruit a warty capsule.fruit striking red. A similar, but non-native species, E. europaeus (European spindle tree) has smooth branches and greenish-white flowers.42 Viburnum lentagoNANNYBERRY:Smells like dirty socks; branches and leaves smooth; leaves elliptic; leaf stalk has undulating,winged margin; mature fruit black with whitish coat.43 Viburnum prunifoliumBLACK HAW:Twigs stout; branches and leaves smooth (brown-scaly whenyoung); very small leaves may be present below regular leaves;fruit blue-black.

8A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago RegionVolunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)gland44 Viburnum recognitum (V. dentatum lucidum) SMOOTH ARROW-WOOD: 45 Viburnum trilobumTall shrub; lower leaves on a twig have long stalks ( 1 cm) and lack stipules; leaf margin coarselytoothed. The more rare V. dentatum (southern arrow-wood) is similar but has hairy leaf stalks, whileV. rafinesquianum (downy arrow-wood) has stipules and very short leaf stalks (0 - 5 mm long).HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY:May be extinct in the wild; leaves 3-lobed, coarse toothed, pointed;leaf upper-surface sparsely hairy; leaf stalk has columnar glands;marginal flowers in cluster are large and sterile; fruit is orange-red.glands46 Viburnum opulus47 Viburnum acerifoliumMAPLE-LEAVED ARROW-WOOD:EUROPEAN HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY: non-native; leaves 3-lobed, Leaf palmately lobed, coarsely toothed; leaf lower surface w/ branched hairs; leaf stalks w/outcoarse-toothed; leaf upper-surface not hairy; leaf stalk with saucer-shaped glands; fruit purple-black at maturity.glands; marginal flowers sterile; fruit red, often remaining into winter.DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 6.PLANTS KNEE-HIGHOR LOWER.LEAVES SIMPLE (oneleaf per stalk).LEAVES ALTERNATE.48 Chimaphila maculataSPOTTED WINTERGREEN: ankle-high evergreen; leaveswhorled in 3’s; leaf has white vein down center; fruit a brown,erect capsule.49 Chimaphila umbellata cisatlanticaPIPSISSEWA: ankle-high evergreen; leaves whorled; leafleathery; fruit a depressed, round capsule.

A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago Region9Volunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)50 Vaccinium angustifoliumEARLY LOW BLUEBERRY:Knee-high, colony forming shrub; leaves relatively short ( 3 cm long); leaf margins w/ finelyspine-tipped teeth; fruit ripens about 2 weeks earlier than V. pallidum (late low blueberry); preferssandy soils. V. corymbosum (highbush blueberry), a wetland species that quickly exceeds1 m, may be seen further east in Indiana.52 Arctostaphylos uva-ursi coactalisBEARBERRY: evergreen trailing shrub; leaf margins entire;mature fruit red; grows only on Lake Michigan dunes.51 Vaccinium pallidumLATE LOW BLUEBERRY:Knee-high, colony-forming shrub; leaves usually 3-5 cm long andmore than 1.5 cm wide, paler beneath; leaf margins smooth orfinely toothed; prefers sandy soils.53 Gaultheria procumbensWINTERGREEN:Ankle-high evergreen woody plant; leaves thick, oval ( 1.5 cm long), tasting of mint; leaf marginssubtly toothed below middle; fruit red.DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 7.PLANTS ERECT (quickly reaching heights greaterthan 40 cm).LEAVES SIMPLE (oneleaf per stalk).LEAVES ALTERNATE.LEAF MARGINSENTIRE.54 Gaylussacia baccataBOX HUCKLEBERRY: 55 Cornus alternifoliaALTERNATELeaves have golden resin dots on both sides; leaf margins smooth; LEAVED DOGWOOD: shrub pagoda shaped w/ horizontal branching;fruit has 10 seeds.older twigs pale yellow; leaves have pale undersides, arcing venation,and may not always be alternate; fruit blue-black.

A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago Region10Volunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)56 Lindera benzoinSPICEBUSH:Pronounced light spots on bark; leaves papery thin, widest near tip, and 15 cm long; yellowflowers; aromatic flowers and fruit; mature fruit red.57 Dirca palustrisLEATHERWOOD:Shrub 2 m tall; twigs jointed at nodes; leaves elliptic, some withwhitish coat; forms clusters of 2-4 tubular yellow flowers in earlyspring; fruit a red color.DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 8.PLANTS AS INGROUP 7, BUTLEAF MARGINSTOOTHED or LOBED.58 Rhamnus frangulaGLOSSY BUCKTHORN:Non-native, invasive; thornless; leaves glossy; leaf buds fuzzy;ripening fruit multi-colored. Our native buckthorns, R. alnifolia(alder buckthorn) and R. lanceolata (lance-leaved buckthorn) arerare and have a very limited range.60 Prunus virginianaLEAF VENATIONPINNATE.FRUITS FLESHY.CHOKE CHERRY:Branches often have dark colored fungal cankers; leaf margins toothed, but teeth not recurved; leafstalk has minute glands; white flowers on terminal stalks in May.59 Rhamnus catharticaCOMMON BUCKTHORN:Non-native, invasive; one of the first shrubs to leaf-out in springand last to lose leaves in fall; stem tips sharp, almost thorn-like;many-flowered clusters; when cut, may sprout from roots.61 Prunus americanaWILD PLUM:Often forms thickets in sun; twigs sharp; leaves glandless; leafmargins doubly toothed; mature fruits round and red. A similarspecies, P. nigra (Canada plum), differs in that the leaves haveglands on toothed margins and stalk.

A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago Region11Volunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance from Ken Klick (Lake County Forest Preserve), Paul Rothrock, Sue Auerbach, John & Jane Balaban, and Laurel Ross. Environment, Culture and Conservation, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA. [http://www.fmnh.org/temperateguides/]. Chicago Wilderness Guide #5 version 1 (06/2008)62 Prunus pumilaSAND CHERRY:63 Ilex verticillataWINTERBERRY:Sprawling shrub; leaf margins entire only in lower 1/3 of leaf; fruit tart; grows only in sandy soil.Male and female plants separate; branches gray w/ light, scatteredAnother genus in the rose family, chokeberry (Aronia), is superficially remnicent of cherry (Prunus). dots; leaves widest above middle, but narrowed to tip; bright redThe fruit of Aronia prunifolia is a black or red, multi-seeded pome.fruit present from October until birds eat each fruit.DECIDUOUSSHRUBS:GROUP 9.PLANTS AS INGROUP 7, BUTLEAF MARGINSTOOTHED or LOBED.LEAF VENATIONPINNATE.FRUITS NON- FLESHY.64 Spiraea albaMEADOWSWEET: 65 Spiraea tomentosa roseaSTEEPLE BUSH:Twigs smooth; leaves mostly smooth; flowers white; fruit aLeaf undersides w/ fine cobwebby, tangled red hairs; flowerssmooth follicle.magenta; fruit a hairy follicle; found growing in acid sand prairiesand bogs.66 Comptonia peregrinaSWEET FERN: 67 Alnus rugosaSPECKLED ALDER:Plant waist-high; plant very aromatic; leaf margin lobed; flowers Twigs velvety, brown with light spots; leaf margins doubly toothed;leaf narrow to tip; fruit cone-like. Comparatively, A. serrulatayellow-green; fruit a cluster of nutlets; grows only in sandy soil.(smooth alder) has both toothed and wavy leaf margins. A. glutinosa(European alder) leaves are rounded or notched at tip.68 Betula pumilaDWARF BIRCH: trunk diameternever exceeding 3 cm thick;leaves small ( 3 cm long);grows in bogs and fens.

12A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native ShrubsWEB VERSIONShrubs of the Chicago RegionVolunteer Stewardship Network – Chicago WildernessPhotos by: Paul Rothrock (Taylor University, IN), John & Jane Balaban (balx2@comcast.net; North Branch Restoration Project), Kenneth Dritz, Sue Auerbach, Melanie Gunn, Sharon Shattuck, and William Burger (Field Museum). Produced by: Jennie Kluse vPlants.organd Sharon Shattuck, with assistance f

A Selection of Native Shrubs and Noteworthy Non-Native Shrubs W Shrubs of the Chicago Region Volunteer Stewardship Network - Chicago Wilderness

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