Yoga Vasishtha

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LaghuYOGAVASISHTHAEnglish TranslationK. NARAYANASWAMI AIYER

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHA(English Translation)BYK. NARAYANASWAMI AIYER

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHACONTENTSPREFACE . 5INTRODUCTION . 7LAGHU-YOGA-VASISHTA. . 42I. VAIRAGGYA-PRAKARANA . 42MUMUKSHU PRAKARANA. . 96UTPATTI PRAKARANA . 1141.THE STORY OF AKASAJA, THE SON OF AKASA . 1142.THE STORY OF LILA . 1333.THE STORY OF KARKATI . 1674.THR STORY OF AINDHAVA THE SON OF INDU OR THE MOON . 1885.THE STORY or THE DECEITFUL INDRA . 1926.THE STORY OF MANAS (MIND) . 1967.THE STORY OF A BALA (LAD). . 2048.THE STORY OF A SIDDHA . 2079.THE CONCLUSION OF UTPATHTHI-PRAKARANA . 2182

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAIV. STHITHI-PRAKARANA . 2481.THE STORY OF SUKRA VENUS . 2482.THE STORY OF DAMA, VYALA AND KATA . 2623.THE STORY OF BHEEMA, BHASA AND DRUDHA . 2764.THE STORY OF DASURA . 2845.THE STORY OF KACHA . 3216.THE CONCLUSION OF STHITHI PRAKARAXA . 328UPASANTHI PRAKARANA. 3311.THE STORY OF KING JANAKA . 3312.THE STORY OF PUNNYA AND PAVANA. 3443.THE STORT OF THE GREAT BALI . 3614.THE STORY OF PRAHLADA . 3775.THE STORY OF GADHI . 3986.THE STORY OF UDDALAKA . 4137.THE STORY OF SURAGHU . 4378.THE STORY OF BHASA AND VILASA . 4529.THE STORY OF VEETHAHAVTA . 45710.THE CONCLUSION OF UPASANTI PRAKARANA . 481NIRVANA PRAKARANA . 5053

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHA1.THE STORY OF BHUSUNDA . 5052.THE STORY OF DEVA-PUJA (THE WORSHIP OF GOD) . 5353.THE STORY OF BILWA FRUIT . 5564.THE STOKY OF SILA, A GRANITE . 5605.THE STORY OF ARJUNA . 5636.THE STORY OF THE HUNDRED RUDRAS . 5717.THE STORY OF VETALA (GOBLIN) . 5788.THE STORY OF BHAGEERATHA . 5869.THE STORY OF SIKHIDWAJA . 59510.THE STORY OF KACHA . 67411. THE STORY OF MITHYA PURUSHA, THE ILLUSORY PERSONAGE . 67912. THE STORY OF BHRINGISASA . 68413. THE STORY OF IKSHWAKU . 69014. THE STORY OF A MUNI AND A HUNTER . 710THE CONCLUSION OF NIRVANAPRAKARANA . 717K. NARAYANASWAMY AIYAR - BRIEF BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE . 7394

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAPREFACETHE YOGA-VASISTHA is a popular text onAdvaita Vedanta, Puranic in form andphilosophical in content. It is also known by othernames like Arsa Ramayana, Jnana Vasistha, MahaRamayana, Vasistha Ramayana and Vasistha and isascribed to sage Valmiki himself. It is in the form ofreplies given by Vasistha to Sri Rama's queriesregarding philosophical problems of life and death,and human suffering, and treats the essentials ofAdvaita Vedanta. It seems to advocate the dristisristi-vada which holds that the world exists only solong as it is perceived: manodrsyam idam sarvam „thewhole world t)f things is the object of the mind‟.The Laghu-Yoga-Vasistha is an abridged version ofthe Toga-Vasistha, compiled by one Abhinanda ofKashmir. For the first three Prakaranas there is acommentary called Vasistha Candrika byAtmanSuka, and for the last three Prakaranas,Mummidi Devaraya wrote the Samsarataranicommentary (both published with the text,Nirnayasagar Press, Bombay, I888).5

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAThis English rendering of the Laghu-Yoga-Vasisthaby the late K. Narayanaswamy Aiyer was firstpublished in I896 (Thomson & Co., Madras) andthen in I9I4 (Hoe & Co., Madras). It is a freetranslation trying to present the ideas contained inthe text in a lucid manner using at times theexplanations of the Sanskrit commentaries. TheAdyar Library is again bringing this work intoprint as there has been a demand for it. Someeditorial changes have been made. A biographicalsketch of the translator has also been included inthis edition.DIRECTOR6

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAINTRODUCTIONIT is intended to give herein a short introductionto, and an analysis of, Laghu Yoga Vasistha. Ofcourse the analysis cannot be an exhaustive one, asit will have then to run through many pages andform a book of its own. There are, as at presentknown to us, two works by the name of YogaVasistha, the larger one going by the name ofBrihat Yoga Vasistha and the smaller one, LaghuYoga Vasistha. The term Brihat means great, whileLaghu signifies small. Vasistha is because of thiswork emanating from Rishi Vasistha as will beseen later on. Though the book is dubbed with theappellation, Yoga Vasistha, it treats of jnana onlythough practical Yoga is dealt with in two storiesin this work. Even there it says that the pure RajaYoga is meant and not Hatha-Yoga. Rather theword Yoga seems to have been used in the title ofthis work in its generic sense of including JnanaYoga and other Yogas as in the Bhagavad Gita.Of the two above mentioned works, the smallerone is an abridgment of the bigger and contains7

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAabout 6,000 Granthas1, whereas the latter contains36,000. The commentary of the former has the samenumber of Granthas as the original whereas that ofthe latter amounts to 74,000 Granthas which withits original is a lakh on the whole. In the abridgedtext, almost all the words of the bigger one arereproduced verbatim from the bigger one, thework of the author being generally to clip thebigger of its expansive descriptions and so on; sothat in the work before us, we have got thequintessence extracted. This work seems to havebeen undertaken by one Abhinanda, a great panditof Kashmir. The authorship or rather writership isattributed to Rishi Valmiki, the author of theRamayana who is said to have related the whole ofYoga Vasistha to Rishi Bharadwaja as havingoccurred between Sri Rama and Rishi Vasistha. Butof this, later on. The larger work seems to havebeen partially translated by a gentleman hailingfrom Bengal. But this one, though small, it isnamed, is yet big enough.1A Grantha equals 32 syllables8

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAThis work is, in the words of Madame Blavatsky,„meant for the few only‟. In the phraseology of thiswork, it is intended neither for those Ajnanis (orthe worldly-minded), who welter in the sea ofSamsara without being indifferent to the worldlythings nor for those higher spiritual personageswho have reached a state of adeptship, so as to beabove all advice. Hence it is written in the interestsof those who have become indifferent to worldlythings and crave for spirituality becoming a potentfactor in their daily lives. Fancy a work like TheVoice of Silence put into the hands of a worldlyperson of decidedly materialistic view and he willthrow it away in sheer disgust. Similarly will thiswork appear to a person who has not caught aglimpse even of the higher life and principles. Aperson of true Vairagya, should he wish to havenot only some hints thrown on the nature ofcosmos, Manas (mind) and Universal Spirit fromthe idealistic standpoint but also some rules ofguidance in his daily practical life towards occultknowledge with the proper illustrations will hereinfind, in my opinion, a mine of knowledge to beguided by and to cogitate upon.9

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAThere are some peculiar traits in the feature of thiswork as contradistinguished from other spiritualworks in the Sanskrit literature. As all know, theVedas and the Upanishads are so mystic in theirnature in many places that their real meaning isnot grasped clearly and all persons except trueoccultists rare to find in this world interpret themin different ways, one holding that the Vedasinculcate nature worship, another putting uponthem a diametrically opposed view and so on.Even in the Ten Upanishads, all the metaphysicalleaving aside for the present, as impossible, theoccult theories have not been worked out in asystematic manner except in the way of some cluesvouchsafed thereupon. Taking the Puranas in theirdead letter light, our Pandits generally have foundthem replete with indecent and absurd stories andthrown them into a corner; and hence the nickname of Puranas has been applied, in ordinaryusage amongst us, to anything that is a farrago offictions and absurdities. But for the timelyresurrection of them by H. P. Blavatsky with theprofound ray of light shed upon them by her,almost all of us should have unanimously buried,10

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAby this time, into oblivion all those savouring ofPuranas. Even she has not thrown full light onthem, as she probably was not privileged so to do.As regard, Itihasas, namely, the Mahabharata andthe Ramayana, they are considered as so manystories only and as such are much in favour of ourorthodox Pandits who do not care to go aboveworldly things. Vedanta soars high in the region ofthe Absolute with its theories and words; and ourmetaphysicians of the old school in India, carryingthe notion of the physical world up there, try tosolve the problem of the homogeneity or otherwiseof the Infinite and are wrangling with one anotheras our Advaitins, Visishtadvaitins and Dvaitins aredoing in their everyday lives, so much so that theirarguments end in mental gymnastics only andwith nothing practical in their lives. Here a curiousinstance occurs to me. One day an Advaita Panditlectured in a certain place about Brahman beingNirguna (or without any attributes), and the onlyReality and argued with great vehemence againsthis adversary. Next day seeing him, while I waspassing by, circumambulate an idol in a temple, Iasked him as to whom he was paying respects. The11

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAPandit merely laughed over the affair without ananswer. Thus are most of our Pandits, theorizingonly with nothing practical about them andsoaring into the region of the Absolute without aproper knowledge of the basic foundations ofVedanta.But Yoga Vasistha has chalked out for itself a newand distinct path. At first, it enunciates a doctrinein its several bearings and then elucidates it withbeautiful stories. There in it gives also rules ofguidance for the conduct of life in the daily world,these also finding their illustrations in the storiesgiven out. As in the Puranas, we have not to rackour brains over with the slight hints thrown thereinand to sometimes give up in despair the problemsbefore us.Secondly This book serves as a ladder wherewithto scale from the Seswara Sankhya doctrine ofPatanjali as given out in his Yoga-Sutras to theMaya-conception of the Advaita Pantheists andthus renders possible a reconciliation betweenthem both. Through a study of Patanjali’s Yoga12

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHASutras, it is clear from Book III, Aphorism I7 thatthe cause of all pains is the conjunction of the seerwith the visual or the subject with the object; theconception of „I‟ having been brought about by theidentification of the subject with the object.Through Sakshatkara Anubhava or directrealization, the Yogi finds he is one with the subjectand does not find then the reality of the object. It isthis that is illustrated in the story of Suka.Thirdly, some of the theories and facts, occult,metaphysical or otherwise, given out by H. P. B.find their corroborations in this work. I have got adeep-seated conviction in me which tells me that ifTheosophical ideas are ever to gain a firm footingin India, it can only be by showing that it is H. P. B.s explanations alone that can throw proper lightupon and galvanize with life our old Aryan works.For this purpose, I think all the authorities, expressor implied, which are found in a stray form in theHindu works, should be ransacked, culled out andgiven to the world. As H. P. B. herself said, herbusiness was to string the flowers found in India as13

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAwell as in other places and make a nosegay out ofthe same.Now I shall give out some illustrations. They are:(I) That Para brahman, the Absolute is not thecause of the creation of Brahma or the universe ascreation implies some conditioned thought andspace and as the Infinite is unconditioned and cantherefore have no kind of causal relationship tothat which is finite or conditioned, viz., theuniverse which manifests itself or is absorbedaccording to the Law of the Absolute (vide thestory of Sikhidwaja).(2) Devas and Asuras are merely the oppositeintelligential forces or poles in nature such aspositive and negative. With the cessation of the oneaspect, the other also ceases to exist. This statementis to be found in the story of Prahlada.(3) In The Secret Doctrine it is stated that the Asuras,Rudras, etc., represent in one sense the egos ofman; they being the active powers as opposed to14

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHADevas, the passive ones. This fact is exemplified inSukra‟s story as well as in the story of the I00Rudras.(4) The eking out of the double and the meansthrough which such things are done, vis., throughthe mastery of Kundalini Sakti are given out in thestory of Sikhidwaja.(5) Being itself a work intended for occult students,this book gives out the seven states of Jnana andAjnana (vide Utpaththi and Nirvana Prakaranas);the seven Ajnana states are not given out in theworks I have come across though the former are.(6) The relationship between an occult Guru andhis Sishya or disciple (as appears from the story ofSikhidwaja).(7) The experiences of those persons (who are ableto elevate themselves beyond their physical bodies)as a Jiva-Suchi or Neevara-Sukam, either as aneedle or the tail-end of paddy which isexemplified in the Story of Karkati.15

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHA(8) Some of the secret meanings of Brighu,Vasistha, Kasyapa, etc., as well as of the worship ofGod.(9) The reality of thought as in the story of Gadhi.(I0) The emergence of all objects from the moonafter a minor deluge.Vairagya PrakaranaWithout multiplying more instances of this kind, Ishall proceed to the contents of this work. Theoccasion which called it forth demands that thework was intended for those only who wish topractically travel on the higher path. Most of ourreaders will have been fully acquainted with thecontents of our great Epic poem, the Ramayana.We find therein that Rishi Viswamitra turns uponthe stage in the early years of Sri Rama. The Rishiappears before his father, Dasaratha and demandsof him his son Rama to war with the Rakshasasinterfering with his sacrifice. Just before this time,16

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHARama goes on a pilgrimage to the many sacredplaces; and having visited the Asramas(hermitages) of the wise, returns to his nativeplace. On his return, he grows quite disgusted withhis material life, spurns his wealth and other regalpossessions and grows despondent withoutperforming any of his daily duties. His attendantsgo and complain to the King his father of thegrievous plight of their master. Thereupon thefather sends for his son, seats him on his lap andenquires of him his state. But the son evades thequestion by simply laughing over the affair andgets away. At this juncture, Muni Viswamitra turnsup and the King delighted with the usual arrival ofsuch a distinguished and reverend guest consentsto execute any orders of the noble Muni. The Munidemands Rama for his aid at which Dasaratha ispanic-struck. Yet rallying himself, he volunteers hisown services in lieu of his eldest and dearlybeloved boy begotten through dire Tapas.Immediately the Muni begins to curse Dasarathafor his vacillation in the fulfilment of his promises,when Vasistha interposes and pacifies the sage bymaking the King fulfil his promise. Then Rama is17

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAsent for and his servants meanwhile relate to theRishis the pitiable present plight of their masterdisdaining to perform such actions as tasting food,drinking water, etc. At which Vasistha remarksthat the Vairagya (indifference) of the Prince is notakin to that produced by such momentaryaccidents as the loss of some dearly belovedrelative or wealth but is one which is thepremonitory symptom of a spiritual developmentin him after which development all his duties willbe regularly per formed by him. On Rama s arrivalat the regal assembly, he is asked by one of theRishis as to the cause of his present sorrow. Atwhich Rama makes a long tirade against wealth,life, Ahankara, Manas (mind), desires, body andother material things and at last winds up bysaying that he will rather expose himself to thetorments of hell-fire than undergo the excruciatingmental tortures, consuming him little by littlethrough the abovementioned causes. Thisconcludes the chapter called Vairagya Prakarana orthe section on in difference to worldly things.18

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAMumukshu PrakaranaThis work consists on the whole, of six Prakaranasor sections. Passing by the first, namely, VairagyaPrakarana which has appended to it, the story ofSuka, the son of the present Vyasa, we have fiveother Prakaranas, namely, Mumukshu servation),Upasanthi(quiescence)andNirvana (absorption), the last. In these fivechapters, Vasistha inculcates advice upon Rama,gives him the reason why and how he should workin the world by tracing the origin of the universeand the ‟I‟ in man to which are identical from theidealistic stand point with the Original Cause orthe Causeless Cause of all and devising means fortheir destruction and finally initiates him into themysteries of Atman.First comes the story of Suka in the first Prakarana.Suka was not satisfied with all the explanations hisfather, Vyasa gave of Maya and hence resorted toJanaka for aid who by Aparoksha or directrealisation within himself, showed the end. Then19

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAcomes the second Prakarana called Mumukshu. Ofthe four fold qualifications necessary to a discipleon the path, vis., the discrimination of Atman andnon-Atman, etc., Rama having developed the firstthree is asked by Vasistha to concentrate his mindupon the attainment of Moksha. For this purpose,Vasistha expatiates in Mumukshu Prakarana uponthe preliminary qualifications necessary for theattainment of Moksha or salvation. Here the authorsays that the four sentinels posted at the gate ofMoksha are Santi (quiescence of mind or sweetpatience), Vichara (the enquiry after Atman),Santosha (contentment of mind) and Sadhu-Sanga(association with the wise) and will have to bebefriended by one wishing to attain Moksha.Should one of them at least be befriended, he willintroduce the aspirant to his companion sentinels.Then the author goes on to explain that Mokshadoes not mean the physical separation from allworldly affairs but only a state of the mind bereftof all impure Vasanas or clinging towards, but yetworking as usual amidst, worldly things. Thedifference between Vasanas, pure and impure iswell defined in this chapter.20

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAHaving thus given out the nature of the goaltowards which all egos are gravitating, Vasistha, inorder to relieve Rama from the mental despair andanguish in which he was placed, then traces theorigin of „I‟, its growth and its quiescence and thenthat state from which the above three states can beviewed as one. For this purpose, he gives out itsrelationship with the one Reality and the universe.This is precisely the position in which Arjuna wasplaced when he was instructed by Sri Krishna as inthe Bhagavad Gita and when also he was told therelationship existing between the Universal Spirit,the ego and the cosmos; the difference being thatthe detailed instructions in this work are not givenin a veritable battle field but in that of the mindand are illustrated by a series of stories wherein thedifferent stages of the mind are worked out to suita disciple on the path. Now taking his stand on thePantheistic conception of Brahman being the oneReality and the universe and Jiva as his aspect ormanifestation, Vasistha begins the UtpattiPrakarana with the statement that the Jiva or ego in21

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAman and the universe in their innate condition areBrahman only and this phenomenal universe is butan outcome of the Divine Will seeming to be realthrough the workings of the mind. In the technicalphraseology of this work, the ideation reflected inthe Lila-Sankalpa of Brahman is the origin of theworld; its manifestation, the preservation of theworld; and its disappearance, the destruction of theworld. These are the three aspects that are dilatedupon in the second, third and fourth Prakaranas. Inother words, the old Hindu philosophers held thatthe universe is nothing but states or modes ofconsciousness reflected through the Sankalpa orwill of Para Brahman which is said through its Lawto evolve the universe out itself for its Lila or sport.The word Sankalpa is rather a difficult word totranslate. Originally it is the Divine Will inmanifestation and in man in his present stagebecomes the will-thought pertaining to hisAntahkarana or the lower mind. It is through theSankalpa of our Manas that the universe appears tobe and it is this Sankalpa that is asked to be givenup by one who wishes to soar to the one Realitybeyond this universe. The author of this work22

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAdefines, in one chapter, Sankalpa to mean theideation of Aham or „I‟; which arises in therelationship of subject to object when conditioningis brought about.Utpatti PrakaranaIn beginning with Utpatti Prakarana, the authorgives out a story to illustrate Para Brahmmanifesting itself as Brahma, the creator with theconception of „I‟ through its own Sankalpa. Insteadof giving out, as in the Puranas, that the creator,Brahma arose out of the navel of Narayana withfour hands, etc., this work states that, out of theone vast Akasa of Jnanam, the one Plenum ofAbstract Intelligence, a Brahmin, the primeval egocalled Akasaja was born who lived for a long timewhen Kala (time) wanted to get at him and bringhim under his clutches but was unable to do sothrough the radiant Tejas (lustre) that shone abouthis per son. Then Kala consulted with Yama(Death) who also is the personification of Time butin the lower or Rupa planes and advised theformer to go in quest, of any of the past Karmas of23

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAthe Brahmin which were found to be nil.Thereupon Yama is said to have remarked to Kalathat the Brahmin was no other than Brahmahimself; though performing Karmas, Brahma hadnothing clinging to him, as he did not performthem for any selfish purposes of his own. Fromthis, it will be clear that, ere creation began, therewas one vast space or Akasa with no activity in itor in the noumenal state of Para Brahm.When evolution began, three kinds or states ofAkasa are said to have evolved, vis., Jnanakasa,Chidakasa and Bhutakasa. The last is the elementalAkasa compounded of the quintuplicated fiveelements, Akasa, Vayu, etc., whereas Chidakasacorresponds to the plane of the lower mind.Jnanakasa corresponds to the third body or plane.The first ego of Brahma which is differentiated intomany is then, in the story of Lila, traced in itsworkings in the three Akasa above-mentioned. Thethree pairs introduced therein are (i) Lila andPadma, (2) Arundhati and Vasistha, (3) Vidurathaand his spouse. In the story of Karkati we come tothe lowest stage, whether of the man or world. Theintelligence or Purusha that pervades the physical24

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAbody is described in this story. In the Upanishadsand other books, the Purusha in this stage islikened to a thread or the tail-end of paddy. Asstated in this work further on, the normalexperience of humanity now is of being no otherthan the physical body, though some may, intheory, hold that they are different from the body;the second experience is the direct perception oftheir being like a thread-like substance in the grossbody and being different from the gross one. In thethird state, they rise to a direct experience of theirbeing the universe. The Rakshasi Karkati having avoracious stomach was unable to fully gratify herappetite and hence got a boon from Brahma toenter as a Jiva-Suchi or living needle into allhuman beings, with the power of troubling thoseof lower desires but becoming the slaves of thosewho are conquerors of them. It is this Rakshasi thatis at the bottom of all our pains and that can bemade to minister to our wants, if we will onlymake up our minds to lord over our desires.The story of Aindhava brings some corroborationsto the occult doctrine. The author, after describing25

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAthat the universe is no other than the aspect of theBrahmic intelligence, now proceeds to theenumeration of the worlds that exist. At thebeginning of a creation, Brahma is said to haveasked the resplendent orb of the sun to describe itsorigin. The sun and its nine brothers of suns aresaid to have been born out of Indu since accordingto the Hindu or occult doctrine all things mergeinto the moon during Pralaya - the son of Ksyapa,and to be ruling over the ten worlds created bytheir own Sankalpa as if they were Brahmasthemselves. Hence arose the ten worlds out of theirminds. These ten worlds may refer to either the tensolar systems or the ten worlds which are subtlerand subtler than one another and existing in space.Besides the 7 worlds as ordinarily known, there aresaid to be at first three other worlds which havearisen out of the one. Out of the one arises at firstthe three lokas of Brahma, Vishnu and Rudra whooriginate and work in the seven worlds, Bhu,Bhuvar, etc., up to Satya. Then are introduced thestories of the wily Indra, Chitta and a lad toexemplify the illusory nature of the universe. In thestory of Sambarika, the Siddha, the illusory nature26

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAof time is also illustrated. Thus eight storiesconclude this chapter wherein is traced the initialstage of the origin of „I‟ wherein is exemplified thefact that the universe arises out of the mereSankalpa of the original creator, both the universeand Jiva, the intelligence arising as the illusoryaspect of the one Substratum.Sthithi PrakaranaThis section deals with the Sthithi character or thepreservative aspect of the mind or the universe. Inthe first story of Sukra, the ego is made to passafter its origin through a series of births in a timeappearing very short to his father Bhrigu who wasthen engaged in Nirvikalpa Samadhi near his sonand hence was existing in higher planes. Studentsof esoteric literature know full well that, of all theplanets, Sukra or Venus corresponds to our ego orthe higher Marias. This higher Manas and the rayof Atman or Buddhi pass through the differentforms of humanity as well as the lower ones.Having traced thus, the author next proceeds togive out the curious story of Dama and two others27

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAto illustrate how the „I‟ in man developss itself inhim after innumerable births with the Ahankarawe find in him now. Once upon a time, there rageda war between the Devas and the Asuras. Thelatter, finding themselves worsted in it, createdthrough the Mayavic power of their leader threemen without Ahankara or the conception of „I‟ inthem to fight with their opponents; since onewithout Ahankara will be able to face his enemywithout any the least fear, and regardless of theconsequences of his actions. The Devas, findingtheir enemy too tough for them to deal with,applied to the higher powers for help. Vishnuadvised them to adopt a rather queer plan. Thatwas of again and again pretending to make warwith their opponents and of again and againretiring from the field, when their enemy madeonslaughts against them. By this process, they weretold by Vishnu that the „I‟ in the Mayavicpersonages would be provoked and hardened andthat those personages would grow terribly afraidof the results of the war and be discomfitedthrough the generation of „I‟ in them. Thisprocedure was adopted and the Devas gained the28

LAGHU YOGA VASISTHAday. After this was over, three others of true Jnanaand hence without Ahankara were created afreshby the Asuras and sent against the Devas, Findingthem too hard to c

Yoga Vasistha. The term Brihat means great, while Laghu signifies small. Vasistha is because of this work emanating from Rishi Vasistha as will be seen later on. Though the book is dubbed with the appellation, Yoga Vasistha, it treats of jnana only though practical Yoga is dealt with in two stories in this work.

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