New England PsyD Student Handbook - Antioch University Midwest

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Antioch UniversityNew England PsyD Student Handbook(revised August, 2021)Note: This Handbook addresses most PsyD Program policies, except for Practicum,Internship, and Dissertation, for which we have developed separate, specificHandbooks. All four of these PsyD Handbooks are posted to the program website.

Table of ContentsSECTION I: GENERAL PRINCIPLES . 4STUDENT-TRAINEE COMPETENCE . 4ESSENTIAL VALUES OF THE PSYD PROGRAM . 5Relationship Soundness . 5Social Justice . 5Evidence-Based Practice. 6PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT OF STUDENTS . 8ANTIOCH NEW ENGLAND COMMUNICATION VIA EMAIL AND THE DEPARTMENT LISTSERV . 8STUDENT-FACULTY RELATIONS . 8STUDENT-FACULTY COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH . 8ADVANCED STUDENTS AS TEACHING ASSISTANTS . 9RECORDS ACCESS POLICY . 9TRANSFER POLICY . 9WAIVER POLICY . 10CONCERNS ABOUT NON-ACADEMIC ACTIONS . 10STUDENT GRIEVANCES OF NON-ACADEMIC ACTIONS . 10PART-TIME STATUS . 11SPECIAL STUDENTS . 11INCOMPLETES . 11PERSONAL DIFFICULTIES AND PROFESSIONAL WORK . 11PERSONAL DIFFICULTIES AND ACADEMIC WORK . 12PERSONAL THERAPY . 12ATTENDANCE . 12CONFIDENTIALITY IN PROFESSIONAL SEMINARS . 13STUDENT “ELECTRONIC PRESENCE” VIA WEBSITES, BLOGS, EMAIL SIGNATURES, VOICEMAIL MESSAGES, ETC. 13SECTION II: ACADEMIC AFFAIRS . 15STUDENT ADVISING FIRST AND SECOND-YEAR STUDENT ADVISING . 15THIRD AND FOURTH-YEAR STUDENT ADVISING . 15INTEGRATION OF DIVERSITY MATERIAL INTO THE PSYD PROGRAM. 16PLAGIARISM . 16ACADEMIC REVIEW PROCESS . 17Annual Faculty Review of Students . 18Remediation . 19Unsatisfactory Process . 20Frequent Remediation . 20SATISFACTORY PROGRAM PROGRESS . 23Academic Status . 23Satisfactory Program Progress. 23Academic Warning . 23Academic Probation . 24Disenrollment . 24Reenrollment . 25ACADEMIC APPEALS . 25SECTION III: QUALIFYING EXAMS . 28DEVELOPMENT AND RATIONALE . 28TWO FORMATS: COMPREHENSIVE AND INTERVENTION. 29Comprehensive Examination. 29Intervention Section . 30REQUIREMENTS FOR ORIGINAL WORK . 30FACULTY COMMITTEES, EVALUATION AND FEEDBACK . 31QUALIFYING EXAM INSTRUCTIONS . 34General Instructions . 342

COMPREHENSIVE EXAM . 35Scoring of the Comprehensive QE . 36INTERVENTION QE PAPER . 37INTERVENTION QE ORAL EXAMINATION . 37Scoring of the Intervention QE . 37SECTION IV: GOVERNANCE. 38RATIONALE AND ASSUMPTIONS . 38Assumptions and Definitions . 38Organizational Context . 38Affiliate Faculty Role and Issues. 38Core Faculty Role and Issues . 39Student Role . 40Requirements for Program Policy Development . 40MEETINGS, GROUPS, AND PROCEDURES . 41The Doctoral Management Group . 41Doctoral Faculty Retreats . 41The Psy.D. Cabinet . 42Ad Hoc Committees . 42AUNE Student Government . 42Policy Promulgation and Response . 43Course/Teacher Evaluation . 43SECTION V: DEPARTMENTAL CENTERS . 44THE ANTIOCH PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES CENTER (PSC) . 44CENTER FOR DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE (DSJ) . 44SECTION VI: DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS . 46DIVERSITY AWARD . 46Description. 46Eligibility . 46Criteria . 46Selection Process . 46Selection Committee . 47Award . 47GENE PEKARIK MEMORIAL AWARD FOR RESEARCH ON PSYCHOLOGICAL PRACTICE PURPOSE . 47Eligibility . 47Criteria . 47Process . 47Award . 483

SECTION I: GENERAL PRINCIPLESStudent-Trainee CompetenceProfessional psychologists are expected to demonstrate competence within and acrossa number of interrelated dimensions. Programs that educate and train professionalpsychologists also strive to protect the public and profession. Therefore, faculty, trainingstaff, supervisors, and administrators in such programs have a duty and responsibility toevaluate the competence of students and trainees across multiple aspects ofperformance, development, and functioning.It is important that students and trainees in professional psychology programs (at thedoctoral, internship, or postdoctoral level) know at the outset of training that faculty,training staff, supervisors, and administrators have a professional, ethical, andpotentially legal obligation to: (a) establish criteria and methods through which aspectsof competence other than, and in addition to, a student-trainee's knowledge or skillsmay be assessed (including, but not limited to, emotional stability and well-being,interpersonal skills, professional development, and personal fitness for practice); and,(b) ensure, insofar as possible, that the student-trainees who complete their programsare competent to manage future relationships (e.g., client, collegial, professional, public,scholarly, supervisory, teaching) in an effective and appropriate manner. Because ofthis commitment, professional psychology education and training programs strive not toadvance, recommend, or graduate students or trainees with identified problems (e.g.,cognitive, emotional, psychological, interpersonal, technical, and ethical) that mayinterfere with professional competence to other programs, the profession, employers, orthe public at large.As such, within a developmental framework, and with due regard for the inherent powerdifference between students and faculty, students and trainees should know that theirfaculty, training staff, and supervisors will evaluate their competence in areas otherthan, and in addition to, coursework, seminars, scholarship, comprehensiveexaminations, or related program requirements. These evaluative areas include, but arenot limited to, demonstration of sufficient: (a) interpersonal and professionalcompetence (e.g., the ways in which student-trainees relate to clients, peers, faculty,allied professionals, the public, and individuals from diverse backgrounds or histories);(b) self-awareness, self-reflection, and self-evaluation (e.g., knowledge of the contentand potential impact of one's own beliefs and values on clients, peers, faculty, alliedprofessionals, the public, and individuals from diverse backgrounds or histories); (c)openness to processes of supervision (e.g., the ability and willingness to explore issuesthat either interfere with the appropriate provision of care or impede professionaldevelopment or functioning); and (d) resolution of issues or problems that interfere withprofessional development or functioning in a satisfactory manner (e.g., by respondingconstructively to feedback from supervisors or program faculty; by the successfulcompletion of remediation plans; by participating in personal therapy in order to resolveproblems).4

This is applicable to settings and contexts in which evaluation would appropriately occur(e.g., coursework, practica, supervision), rather than settings and contexts that areunrelated to the formal process of education and training (e.g., non-academic, socialcontexts). However, irrespective of setting or context, when a student-trainee’s conductclearly (a) impacts the performance, development, or functioning of the student-trainee;(b) raises questions of an ethical nature; (c) represents a risk to public safety; or (d)damages the representation of psychology to the profession or public, appropriaterepresentatives of the program may review such conduct within the context of theprogram’s evaluation processes.Although the purpose here is to inform students and trainees that evaluation will occurin these areas, it should be emphasized that the program's evaluation processes andcontent include: (a) information regarding evaluation processes and standards (e.g.,procedures should be consistent and content verifiable); (b) information regarding theprimary purpose of evaluation (e.g., to facilitate student or trainee development; toenhance self-awareness, self-reflection, and self- assessment; to emphasize strengthsas well as areas for improvement; to assist in the development of remediation planswhen necessary); (c) seeking more than one source of information regarding theevaluative area(s) in question (e.g., across supervisors and settings); and (d)opportunities for remediation, provided that faculty, training staff, or supervisorsconclude that satisfactory remediation is possible for a given student-trainee.Essential Values of the PsyD ProgramIn addition to integrating diversity into the program, the department is incorporating itscommitment to addressing the essential values of relationship soundness, social justice,and evidence based practice.Relationship SoundnessWe view a range of professional relationships as central and necessary to successfulfunctioning as a professional psychologist. Relationship soundness is viewed as afoundational competency in our Program. This assertion is bolstered by the expandingliterature that includes work by the Association of Psychology Training Clinics, theNational Council of Schools of Professional Psychology, and the Council of Chairs ofTraining Councils of the American Psychological Association. Some of the elements ofthe relationship competency include: use of reflective practice, considering multipleperspectives, being patient with both self and others, asserting one’s perspective in amature manner, demonstrating civility and respect in word and manner, using selfdisclosure appropriately, managing one’s affect appropriately in self and with others,moving from a stance of judgment to one of curiosity, and listening. Addressingrelationship soundness lies within the context of the Department’s evaluation richculture and the ongoing natural conversations and interactions regarding relationshipsoundness between faculty and students inform an organic yet sensible definition ofrelationship soundness.Social Justice5

Rooted in the spirit of Antioch College’s first president, Horace Mann, who stated, “Beashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity,” the Psy.D. programviews awareness of injustices, and action toward social justice as central to our trainingof clinical psychologists. We also believe that social justice extends beyond attitudesand into actions that promote the creation of a space for the human spirit to thrive andthe establishment and continuation of just relationships. Students are encouraged tobecome agents of change as they integrate the values of social justice in theirprofessional work. Social justice entails respect, care, and equity; with a consciousnessabout the impact of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, family responsibility of familystatus, marital status, religious or political conviction, pregnancy, age, and disability. Byrecognizing the dignity of each individual the Department seeks to build a healthycommunity based on social justice.Evidence-Based PracticeWe define Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as an evidence-informed process ofdecision-making for the purpose of promoting the mental and social health of individualsand communities. The EBP process integrates the best available local evidence andempirical research and scholarship, with practitioners’ skills and expertise and thecultural and economic conditions, needs, values, and preferences of clients who areserved and affected (Council of Training in Evidence-Based Behavioral Practice, 2008).Multiple types of evidence support decision-making in practice: clinical observation andpractice based evidence, qualitative research, systematic case studies, single-casedesigns, epidemiological and ethnographic research, process-outcome studies,randomized clinical trials, studies of interventions as they are delivered in naturalisticsettings (effectiveness research), basic psychological and health science, and metaanalyses (APA, 2006). Experimental studies are read critically with regard to treatmentcontexts and settings, the constitution of experimental and control groups, methodology,threats to validity, and effect sizes (Wampold & Bhati, 2004). When used for makingdecisions, we ask whether the study’s methods and findings justify causal explanations,particularly as applied in a local context (Shedler, 2015). In evaluating the evidenceused in clinical decision-making, we pay particular attention to issues related to socialjustice and cultural relevance, and we view evidence as ecologically or systemicallyembedded as well as historical, and evaluate it accordingly (APA Task Force forMulticultural Guidelines, 2017).Our students apply EBP decision-making through: Systematic acquisition and use of local, practice-based evidence to informpractice Critical analysis of scholarly evidence, including its source, methodology, andanalysis Acquiring evidence of best available research and scholarship Appraising whether the evidence fits clients and groups in their specific social,cultural, historical, and economic contexts6

Utilization of assessment procedures that are context-specific in their validity forlocal populations Assessing in an unbiased manner their own level of expertise to implementinterventions Decision-making with collaborators and supervisors Applying a wide-range of clinical theories Implementing interventions supported by evidence Evaluating, Disseminating, and Following-Up for quality improvement, changeanalysis, and practice adjustment.Students receive training in the evolution of EBP and strategies for retrieving andevaluating relevant evidence in their first year Intervention sequence. The Programprovides training to both students and practicum sites in the use of clinical feedbacksystems, and requires that students describe how they monitor client progress as part ofCase Conference and the InterventionQualifying Exam. The Department's Center for Behavioral Health Innovation employsstudents in research and evaluation projects in which naturalistic practice systems areengaged in using evidence based standards in combination with formative, local data tostrategically and incrementally refine their practice in accord with local circumstances.7

ReferencesAPA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice. (2006). Evidence-basedpractice in psychology. American Psychologist, 61, 271-285.APA Task Force for Multicultural Guidelines: Clauss-Ehlers, C., Tummala-Nara, P.,Roysircar, G., Hunter, S., & Chiriboga, D. (2017). Re-envisioning the multiculturalguidelines for the 21st Century. Washington DC: APA.Council for Training in Evidence-Based Behavioral Practice: Beck, J. G, Castonguay, L.G., Chronis-Tuscano, A., Klonsky, E. D., McGinn, L. K., & Youngstrom, E. A.(2008). Definition and competencies for evidence-based behavioral practice(EBBP). From www.ebbp.org/documents/ebbp competencies.pdfShedler, J. (2015). Where is the evidence for “evidence-based” therapy?” The Journalof Psychological Therapies in Primary Care, 4: 47-59.Wampold, B., & Bhati, K. (2004). Attending to the omissions: A historical examination ofevidenced-based practice movements. Professional Psychology: Research andPractice, 35(6), 563-570.Professional Conduct of StudentsAntioch’s Department of Clinical Psychology subscribes to the American PsychologicalAssociation's Code of Ethics and all students are bound by the principles enumerated inthe Code. Deviation from the Code may result in disciplinary action, includingrecommendation for disenrollment from the Department’s academic programs.Antioch New England Communication via Email and the Department ListservAll students are required to participate in Antioch New England’s email andconferencing system as well as the Department’s listserv. This is necessary so as to beassured that important notices and communications can be exchanged.Student-Faculty RelationsThe Department aims for collegial, mutually respectful relationships between faculty andstudents. The program aspires to create a non-competitive, mutually supportiveenvironment. This requires a high level of professionalism and personal integrity on thepart of everyone.Student-Faculty Collaborative ResearchWith respect to collaborative research: a) faculty and student should discuss ownershipof data and authorship on presentations and publications early enough in thecollaborative process so that each is aware of his/her role; and b) faculty and studentshould publicly acknowledge one another's contributions at conferences, in written work,etc. Guidelines about authorship and author order are addressed in greater detail in theAPA Ethical Standards.8

Advanced Students as Teaching AssistantsTeaching Assistants are in a position of authority with other students. As such, they aregoverned by the same standards of conduct in the performance of their academicresponsibilities as are members of the faculty. All Teaching Assistants shall respect therights and opinions of students and uphold the academic standards of ANE.Records Access PolicyThe Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, known as “The BuckleyAmendment,” addresses the subject of access to educational records. The act requiresinstitutions to establish policies which set forth the procedure by which these recordsare to be reviewed or inspected. Students have a right to inspect and review theirrecords. Student requests must be made to the Department Office Manager in writingwith at least one week notice. University policy in this matter is specified in the currentANE Student Handbook.By virtue of completing an ANE application for admission, applicants are giving informedconsent to the admissions committee (which includes admissions personnel, ANEfaculty, and Department of Clinical Psychology graduate students) to review all materialin the admissions file.Transfer PolicyStudents wishing to transfer into the doctoral program in clinical psychology must followthe procedures and meet the criteria outlined below:Students wishing to apply to transfer must seek approval of the Director of Admissionsin the Department of Clinical Psychology. Transfer requests will be consideredthroughout the school year.1. Transfer applicants must be students in good standing at an APA-accrediteddoctoral program in clinical or counseling psychology. Only a grade of B or betterwill be accepted for advanced standing credit if the institution uses a traditionalgraded system of evaluation.2. Transfer applicants must submit a non-refundable application fee prior to reviewof their application and graduate records.3. Transfer applicants must submit syllabi from their previous Doctoral Program thatdemonstrate an equivalent course. Equivalency is defined as one that shares atleast 75 percent of the current content and readings with a Department of ClinicalPsychology course.4. The Director of Student Affairs will work with transfer students to determine aviable curriculum that enables them to enter the doctoral program as efficientlyas possible. No waiver or transfer credit will be granted for practicum experience.5. Transfer students are required to spend a minimum of three years, full-time, onsite at Antioch New England, plus one year of Internship. Prior to this, it may alsobe necessary for transfer students to assume part-time, “special” student status9

in order to complete particular courses which enable them to move into sequencein our developmental curriculum.Waiver PolicyWaivers grant permission not to take a particular course in the program; they do notreduce the required number of credits to graduate, or shorten the program. A studentwho is granted a course waiver selects an alternative course to take instead. Theprogram remains full time, and except for transfer students, it cannot be shortened.Students granted transfer credit for less than one full year may be given advancedstanding and may have a reduction in tuition.The criterion for waiving a course is evidence of having successfully passed anequivalent graduate level course in the area. “Equivalent” is defined as either sharing atleast 75 percent of the content and readings with a Department of Clinical Psychologycourse, or one in which the student passes an examination (written and/or oral)administered by department faculty.No advanced standing credits are awarded by the Doctoral Program for master’s levelwork, only waivers are awarded for master’s level work. Neither waivers nor advancedstanding credits are awarded for practica, case conferences, or advanced electives. Alldoctoral students must maintain a full-time load. Typically, students who waive coursestake the next required course available in the same time slot. Students who thereforehave completed elements of the curriculum early, use that time to make additionalprogress on their dissertation. Waivers are only evaluated for matriculated students.Concerns about Non-Academic ActionsThe Department hires faculty and staff as well as admits students who are believed touphold the standards of the American Psychological Association. In alignment with theAmerican Psychological Association’s Code of Ethics, concerns about conduct of astudent, staff, or faculty member should first be address

Antioch University New England PsyD Student Handbook (revised August, 2021) Note: This Handbook addresses most PsyD Program policies, except for Practicum, Internship, and Dissertation, for which we have developed separate, specific Handbooks. All four of these PsyD Handbooks are posted to the program website.

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