Arts Education In Public Elementary And Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 .

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ArtsEducationIn Public Elementary and Secondary Schools1999–2000 and 2009–10NCES 2012 -014U.S. Department of Education

ArtsEducationIn Public Elementary and Secondary Schools1999–2000 and 2009–10Basmat ParsadMaura SpiegelmanWestatJared CoopersmithProject OfficerNational Center for Education StatisticsNCES 2012–014U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

U.S. Department of EducationArne DuncanSecretaryInstitute of Education SciencesJohn Q. EastonDirectorNational Center for Education StatisticsJack BuckleyCommissionerEarly Childhood, International, and Crosscutting Studies DivisionVal PliskoAssociate CommissionerThe National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data relatedto education in the United States and other nations. It fulfills a congressional mandate to collect, collate, analyze, and report full andcomplete statistics on the condition of education in the United States; conduct and publish reports and specialized analyses of themeaning and significance of such statistics; assist state and local education agencies in improving their statistical systems; and reviewand report on education activities in foreign countries.NCES activities are designed to address high-priority education data needs; provide consistent, reliable, complete, and accurate indicatorsof education status and trends; and report timely, useful, and high-quality data to the U.S. Department of Education, the Congress, thestates, other education policymakers, practitioners, data users, and the general public. Unless specifically noted, all information containedherein is in the public domain.We strive to make our products available in a variety of formats and in language that is appropriate to a variety of audiences. You, as ourcustomer, are the best judge of our success in communicating information effectively. If you have any comments or suggestions about thisor any other NCES product or report, we would like to hear from you. Please direct your comments toNCES, IES, U.S. Department of Education1990 K Street NWWashington, DC 20006-5651April 2012The NCES Home Page address is http://nces.ed.gov.The NCES Publications and Products address is http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.This report was prepared for the National Center for Education Statistics under Contract No. ED-04-CO-0059/0025 with Westat.Mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.Suggested CitationParsad, B., and Spiegelman, M. (2012). Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999–2000 and 2009–10 (NCES 2012–014).National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC.For ordering information on this report, write toED PubsU.S. Department of EducationP.O. Box 22207Alexandria, VA 22304or call toll free 1-877-4-ED-Pubs or order online at http://www.EDPubs.gov.Content ContactJared Coopersmith(202) 219-7106jared.coopersmith@ed.gov

AcknowledgmentsThe authors would like to recognize the school principals and teachers in public elementary and secondary schools who provided dataon arts education upon which the report is based. The data were collected on behalf of the Office of Innovation and Improvement in theU.S. Department of Education.Select photos courtesy of the U.S. Department of Education and the Educational Theatre Association.Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary SchoolsIII

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Table of ContentsPageAcknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IIIList of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VIIList of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IXAppendix A Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XIAppendix B Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XIIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1Arts Education at a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5Elementary Schools and Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5Availability of arts education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5677Characteristics of arts education programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Arts education activities outside of regular school hours and school-community partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Teaching load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Secondary Schools and Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Availability of arts education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Characteristics of arts education programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Arts education instructors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Graduation requirements and the calculation of grade point averages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Arts education activities outside of regular school hours and school-community partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Teaching load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A Closer Look at Music Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99101111121314Elementary Schools and Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14Indicator 1: Availability of Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 2: Characteristics of Music Education Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 3: Music Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 4: Teaching Load for Music Specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 5: Integration of Music and Other Subject Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 6: Student Assessment in Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Secondary Schools and Teachers141516171820. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21Indicator 7: Availability of Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 8: Characteristics of Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 9: Music Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 10: Teaching Load for Music Specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 11: Integration of Music and Other Subject Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 12: Student Assessment in Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212223242526Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary SchoolsV

Table of Contents (continued)PageA Closer Look at Visual Arts Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28Elementary Schools and Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28Indicator 13: Availability of Visual Arts Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 14: Characteristics of Visual Arts Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 15: Visual Arts Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 16: Teaching Load for Visual Arts Specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 17: Integration of Visual Arts and Other Subject Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 18: Student Assessment in Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282930313232Secondary Schools and Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34Indicator 19: Availability of Visual Arts Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 20: Characteristics of Visual Arts Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34Indicator 21: Visual Arts Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 22: Teaching Load for Visual Arts Specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 23: Integration of Visual Arts and Other Subject Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 24: Student Assessment in Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A Closer Look at Dance Education3536373839. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40Elementary Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40Indicator 25: Availability of Dance Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 26: Characteristics of Dance Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 27: Dance Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404142Secondary Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43Indicator 28: Availability and Characteristics of Dance Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 29: Dance Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4345A Closer Look at Drama /Theatre Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46Elementary Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46Indicator 30: Availability of Drama/Theatre Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 31: Characteristics of Drama / Theatre Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Indicator 32: Drama /Theatre Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .464648Secondary Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49Indicator 33: Availability and Characteristics of Drama/Theatre Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49Indicator 34: Drama/Theatre Professional Development for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51Related Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52Appendix A: Technical Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1Appendix B: Standard Errors for Text Tables and Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1VIArts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools

List of TablesTablePage1 Percent of public elementary school music and visual arts specialists who taught the arts subject full time,and of those teachers, percent reporting various indicators of teaching load: School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Average class size for classes taught by public elementary school classroom teachers, percent of the teachersreporting that they included arts instruction in their classroom program, and of those teachers, percent reportingvarious ways of teaching arts subjects: School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Percent of public secondary schools reporting arts coursework requirements for graduation and the inclusionof grades in arts classes in the calculation of grade point averages: School years 1999–2000 and 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Percent of public secondary school music and visual arts specialists who taught the arts subject full time,and of those teachers, percent reporting various indicators of teaching load: School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Among public elementary schools that offered instruction in music, percent reporting selected programcharacteristics for music, by percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch: School years1999–2000 and 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Percent of public elementary school music specialists reporting that they participated in various professionaldevelopment activities, and of those teachers, percent reporting that participation improved their teaching toa moderate or great extent: School years 1999–2000 and 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Percent of public elementary school music specialists who taught music full time, and of those teachers,percent reporting various indicators of teaching load, by percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch:School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Percent of public elementary school music specialists reporting that they participated in various activitiesthat focused on the integration of music with other subjects, by percent of students eligible for free or reduced-pricelunch: School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Among public secondary schools that offered music instruction, number of music instructorsreported by schools and percent that were art specialists in 2008–09, percent of schools reportingthe number of courses offered in 2008–09, and percent reporting district curriculum guides anddedicated rooms for instruction in 2009–10, by percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2210 Percent of public secondary school music specialists reporting that they participated in various professionaldevelopment activities, and of those teachers, percent reporting that participation improved theirteaching to a moderate or great extent: School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2311 Percent of public secondary school music specialists who taught music full time, and of those teachers,percent reporting various indicators of teaching load, by percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch:School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2412 Percent of public secondary school music specialists reporting that they participated in various activitiesthat focused on the integration of music with other subjects, by percent of students eligible for free orreduced-price lunch: School year 2009–10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10 (NCES 2012-014). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC. For ordering information on this report, write to ED Pubs. U.S. Department of Education. P.O. Box 22207. Alexandria, VA 22304

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