SUBJECT: SWIMMING POOL, POOL NATATORIUM AND POOL AREA HVAC . - TownNews

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June 1, 2018 Milton Area School District Attn: Stephen Schantz 114 W High Street Milton, WI 53563 SUBJECT: SWIMMING POOL, POOL NATATORIUM AND POOL AREA HVAC EVALUATION MILTON HIGH SCHOOL RAMAKER & ASSOCIATES, INC. PROJECT NUMBER: 38303 Dear Mr. Schantz: The Milton Area School District hired Ramaker & Associates, Inc. (Ramaker) to evaluate the existing swimming pool basin, pool equipment, natatorium, and the pool area HVAC system. The evaluation was performed on April 19, 2018 by - Daryl Matzke, P.E. - Aquatics Engineer; Jeff Radue, P.E. – Mechanical Engineer; Dan Smith, Licensed Architect; and Kyle Reger, Engineering Technician. Participating in the evaluation for the School District was Stephan Schantz – Building & Grounds Supervisor and Zach Johnson – Head of Maintenance. Milton High School (MHS) currently has a six lane 75-foot competition swimming pool constructed in 1963. The pool depth ranges from 3’-6” to 10’-0”. Originally, the natatorium was built along an exterior building wall. MHS was expanded in 1976 and again in 1998 with building additions that wrapped around the natatorium eliminated exposure to exterior walls. In 1986, the original gravity sand pool filter was replaced with the current vacuum diatomaceous earth (DE) filter and the pool perimeter piping was replaced. Virginia Graeme Baker Act (VGBA) modifications to the main drains were completed in 2010. The pool basin, pool water treatment equipment and pool area HVAC equipment have been well maintained and function well given the facility’s deterioration due to age and use. Beyond concerns due solely to the facilities age and use, a significant item for consideration is that the natatorium was originally designed for a smaller school population than today. During evaluation, concerns were noted with the following items. Pool area lighting Pool area locker rooms Pool basin tile Pool area exposed roof structure Pool deck equipment Pool area floor and wall tile Pool main drain piping Pool area deck settlement and deck drains Pool filter system Full perimeter pool gutter lip overflow Pool surge tank Pool area competitor and spectator Pool water treatment equipment seating Pool area HVAC system This Report provides a summary of concerns noted and improvement considerations. Photographs may be found in Appendix A for reference. Photos 1 and 2 provide an overall view of the pool room. A Rough Order of Magnitude Construction Estimate is provided in Appendix B. An asbestos analysis completed by Environmental Management Consulting, Inc. (EMC) for MHS is included in Appendix C. WI - 855 Community Drive, Sauk City, WI 53583 MN - 103 15th Avenue NW, Suite 300, Willmar, MN 56201 NJ - 123 Broadway, 2nd Floor, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677 PR - Riverview Calle 22 T #10, Bayamon, PR 00961 (608) 643-4100 www.ramaker.com

June 1, 2018 Page 2 of 8 The Rock County Health Department performed the annual swimming pool licensing inspection on May 15, 2018. A copy of the inspection report is in Appendix D. Pool Area Locker Rooms The locker rooms adjacent to the Natatorium are used by pool patrons. These locker rooms were constructed as part of the building addition in the 1976. The Boy’s and Girl’s locker rooms have an adequate number of toilet facilities for compliance with the pool code. Unfortunately, the bathroom facilities do not contain ADA compliant showers. There appears to be space available adjacent to the current shower stalls to allow installation of ADA compliant showers. The lay-in ceiling grid in the office adjacent to the locker rooms is corroded and should be replaced with renovation of the pool area. Steel Doors and Frames Due to the humid conditions typical of pool areas, the steel doors and frames require ongoing maintenance to address corrosion concerns. This is especially true for the north end storage room door which should be replaced. The facility would benefit with the installation of fiberglass doors and frames when replacement is necessary. Pool Area Exposed Roof Structure The exposed open web joists and metal deck are original and have been well maintained. Photo 3 shows the general condition of the ceiling. A detailed investigation of the joists and metal deck was not performed. During the evaluation, it was noted that surface corrosion is beginning to form on portions of the exposed metal deck. Photo 4 shows surface corrosion is visible in the northwest corner of the room, adjacent to the locker rooms. The corrosion is due to the chlorinated pool air in the room. A detailed investigation of the affected areas was not performed. It is recommended that the surface corrosion be removed, and the structure have an appropriate paint system applied to protect against the harsh environment. Pool Area Deck and Wall Tile Most of the tile deck is original to the building’s construction and is still in relatively good condition. A portion of the deck was retiled during a modification in 1989 when the pool perimeter piping and inlets were replaced. As shown in Photo 5, there are areas of the deck tile with missing tile where sharp edges are present. Areas also exist where the original tiles have been replaced with mismatched tiles. Loose tile needs to be replaced and sharp edges addressed as part of the tile routine maintenance. The pool room wall tiles require constant monitoring and repair due to adhesion failure because of the facilities age, bonding deterioration, use and potential building settlement conditions. Photo 6 is representative of the current condition of the wall tile. To reduce the effort required in maintaining the wall tile, it is recommended that the tile be removed and replaced with moisture resistant gyp board having an epoxy paint system. The new wall surface can be secured to the concrete block wall with hat channels. Note that the facility would benefit with the installation of fiberglass acoustic paneling with fabric wrap on the walls and ceiling for sound absorption. 38303 Milton HS Pool Study 060118

June 1, 2018 Page 3 of 8 Pool Area Asbestos Due to the age of the building, the maintenance staff had an asbestos analysis performed by Environmental Management Consulting, Inc. (EMC) using a method called Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). A copy of the EMC Report may be found in Appendix C. The report indicates that the pool area contains instances of Chrysotile in concentrations of less than 1% in some areas and less than 2% in others. Abatement is not required if the asbestos if the amount present is less than 1%. The report does not fully document the sample locations within the Natatorium. It is possible that asbestos could be found in the paneling located between the wall tile and roof structure. However, the method used to measure asbestos (PLM) is not the most accurate test available. For a more accurate analysis, it is recommended that a Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) test be performed prior to proceeding with any removal. Pool Deck and Deck Drains Along the north, east, and south sides of the pool, the deck has settled creating a separation between the deck and building wall (Photo 7). Options to remediate this area include re-sloping the surface by using a mud jacking fill below the concrete to raise the floor, or to remove the effected deck and reconstruct with proper compaction. Prior to repairs, the affected areas need to be surveyed and measured for a couple years to determine if the deck has fully settled or if there is still movement. The results of the survey will need to be evaluated by a structural engineer to verify that settlement is limited to the deck only and not building wall foundations along with how to proceed with repairs. The pool deck is currently pitched to drain into the pool overflow gutter allowing the deck water to enter the pool recirculation system and mix with the pool water. This may have been acceptable with the original pool construction but is not allowed by the current pool code. The State of Wisconsin will require the method of deck drainage to be changed if any major pool basin or deck repairs are proposed. Pool Area Competitor and Spectator Seating There are aluminum bleachers located in the pool room for spectator and competitor seating (Photos 8 and 9). The number of seats available does not meet the demand during swim meets. Spectators are cycled in by groups for viewing individual heats. There is not enough space available within the Natatorium to expand the seating required for the demand. Pool Area Lighting New fluorescent fixtures were installed in 2013 and are sufficient for pool area lighting though the center of the pool may be below required levels. Typical standards require a uniform level of 30 footcandles at the water surface when underwater pool lighting is used or 50 foot-candles when underwater lighting is not present. The pool does not have underwater lighting. It is recommended that the lighting levels be measured to insure code requirements are met. Recently, light fixtures with greater energy efficiency have become prevalent and should be considered when future replacement occurs. Pool Basin The pool basin was originally constructed in 1963 with filter modifications in 1986 and Virginia Graeme Baker Act (VGBA) modifications in 2010. This pool was originally designed for learn to swim lessons and competition swimming. The pool meets the minimum USA Swimming competition requirements for 25-yard racing. 38303 Milton HS Pool Study 060118

June 1, 2018 Page 4 of 8 Based on observations made during the site visit, while the pool was full of water and operating, the interior of the pool basin appears to be in relatively good condition. However, corrosion of the concrete reinforcing steel was found in the concrete ladder treads in the basin (Photo 10). Typically, the observed corrosion is a result waterproofing lost due to worn tile or missing grout. There are also instances of missing tile in the basin interior (Photo 11). Our understanding is that the pool basin tile has been re-grouted within the past 3 years. Due to the basin being full of water, a detailed investigation of the noted areas was not performed. There is a large section of gutter extending along the south side from and beyond the southeast to northwest corners where water is not overflowing the gutter lip. This is likely due to settlement of the pool basin allowing a greater amount water to flow over the gutter lip elsewhere along the pool perimeter – for example, in the northeast corner. Note that there is no evidence of concrete cracks inside the basin or in deck adjacent to the pool. To provide proper overflow, further settlement needs to be prevented and the gutter lip either ground down or raised up to be level around the full pool perimeter. This effort will require tile replacement around the pool perimeter. The lack of full perimeter gutter flow was noted as a code violation by the Rock County Department of Health when the annual swimming pool licensing inspection was performed on May 15, 2018. The inspection report states that violations must be corrected by the next routine inspection. (See Appendix D) The original overflow gutter trench and grating is still present around the pool basin. The grating frame is failing causing the grate to collapse into the gutter. This is evident by the replaced gutter grating (Photo 12). The grating along the perimeter is also uneven and unsecure. As a temporary fix, the maintenance staff has placed supports in the gutter to hold up the grating. However, the addition of these supports reduces the inside gutter trough width which may impact the capacity for water to flow to the surge tank. It is recommended that the gutter be modified for installation of a new grate and frame. Pool Deck Equipment The electrical boxes, doors and door hardware located throughout the pool room is showing signs of corrosion (Photos 13 and 14). The effected hardware should have the corrosion removed or be replaced. The existing six starting blocks are original from 1963 (Photo 15). They are sturdy but have some sharp edges and show signs of corrosion. Installation of new starting blocks should be considered due to the ongoing repair and technical improvements. The pool basin does not have any means of ADA accessibility. Typically pools have either an ADA compliant ramp or permanently mounted battery operated lift for ADA compliance. It is recommended that an ADA compliant lift be installed. There are retractable wall mounted pool covers on the north side of the pool room (Photo 16). The intent of these covers is to reduce heat loss, evaporation and transfer of chloramines from the pool water to the air. However, all the lane lines and ropes must be removed from the pool to allow cover placement. The removal and reinstallation of the lane lines is a cumbersome task. If not correctly done, the cover may be damaged during placement/removal. The time required for cover placement/removal (including lane lines) is not conducive for its use. The pool cover also creates a nuisance condition by running water down the room wall when rolled up. It is recommended that the pool cover system be removed. 38303 Milton HS Pool Study 060118

June 1, 2018 Page 5 of 8 Pool Main Drain Improvements were completed on the two pool main drains in 2010 (Photo 17) for compliance with the Virginia Graeme Baker Act (VGBA). During the modifications, the main drain cover was replaced. Our understanding is that the original cast iron piping from the main drains to the surge tank still exists. The cast iron piping is likely to be very corroded resulting in flow restrictions and potential leaks. It is recommended that the cast-iron piping be replaced with PVC by saw-cutting a trench across the pool bottom in the diving well, excavating under the pool wall, and connecting to the existing surge tank piping. Pool Filter Tank The original pool filter was modified in 1986 from a gravity sand system to a vacuum diatomaceous earth (DE) filter (Photo 18). The DE filter operates by gravity flow of water from the surge tank into the filter tank. Water is pumped out of the filter tank through the rest of the recirculation system and returned to the pool. The DE filter has an effective filter area of 336 Square Feet (SF). Typically, DE filters are designed to for a filtration rate between 1 to 2 GPM/SF. This filter system was designed to provide a filtration rate of 0.84 GPM/SF for the recirculation flow rate of 281 GPM (8-hour turnover time). However, sometime after the installation the recirculation rate was increased to 380 GPM (6-hour turnover time) increasing the filtration rate available to 1.13 GPM/SF. It does not appear that modifying the recirculation rate to the 6-hour turnover was submitted for State of Wisconsin review and approval. Submittal of this change to the State for review may be required. A detailed investigation into the approval status of the recirculation system was not performed. The existing DE filter tank has an open top that exposes a large quantity of chloramines and pool water vapor to the equipment room. This results in corrosion of the pool equipment and room itself. To reduce the long-term effect of the equipment room corrosion, elimination of the DE filter is recommended, and a high rate sand filter system be installed. With a high rate sand filtration system, the pool water will be fully contained and not exposed to the pool equipment room atmosphere. Pool Surge Tank Within the pool equipment room, a below grade surge tank exists accessible through a floor hatch for maintenance. (Photo 19) Based on observations made during the site visit while the pool and surge tank was full of water and operating, the interior of the surge tank appears to be in relatively good condition. Even though the hatch cover is solid, a large quantity of chloramines and pool water vapor passes through the hatch into the equipment room. It is recommended that an exhaust system be provided for the surge tank to keep the tank negative with the equipment room. Pool Water Treatment Equipment The following water treatment equipment exists for the swimming pool: Recirculation Pump: One 7.5 hp pump running at 380 gpm (Photo 20). Filter: One open top vacuum DE filter (Photo 18). Heater: One gas fired pool heater located in the mezzanine above the pool equipment room (Photo 21). Chemical Feed Equipment: Liquid chlorine is used for disinfection and acid for pH control. A Chemtrol controller feeds the pool chemicals as needed (Photos 22 and 23). 38303 Milton HS Pool Study 060118

June 1, 2018 Page 6 of 8 Electrical Service Panel: Located in the storage room adjacent to the pool equipment room (Photo 24). The water treatment equipment appears to be in good condition. With a recirculation rate of 380 gpm, the basin has a turnover time of six hours. It was noted by the maintenance staff that the electrical equipment and conduits in the equipment room were recently replaced as part of routine maintenance. The liquid chlorine and acid tanks are currently stored in the pool equipment room. Due to their location, refilling the tanks creates a nuisance condition where the chemicals need to be hauled through the school hallways and stairs to reach the equipment room. It is recommended that the chemicals be relocated to the mezzanine above the pool equipment room. This is an at grade location near an exterior door. As previously mentioned, the DE filter tank and surge tank currently vent into the pool equipment room creating a large source of chloramines and humidity. It is recommended that the DE filter be abandoned for a high rate sand filter system and the surge tank be provided with an exhaust system to improve the equipment room air quality. Pool Area HVAC System As part of the original construction, the pool area HVAC system is located in an mezzanine above the pool equipment room. The system consists of two 8,000 cfm air handlers that provide conditioned air to the space (Photos 25 and 26). The State of Wisconsin HVAC code requires a minimum of 1 CFM/SF of pool deck and water surface if humidity controls are provided and 2 CFM/SF without. A hot water coil is used by the air handler to raise the air temperature. It was noted by the maintenance staff that there is no humidity control/mechanical dehumidification or exhaust fan for the pool area. Humidity control will help reduce the moisture and potential for mold growth. An exhaust fan is necessary to allow fresh air to enter the room. Typically, pool air handlers bring in fresh air by a manual damper. This means that fresh air will enter the system only when air is exhausted from the system. As a short-term solution, it is recommended that the HVAC equipment be replaced to provide humidity control and an exhaust fan be provided for the pool room and equipment rooms to provide the code required amount of fresh air into the rooms. The installed HVAC equipment is intended to last the life of the pool with repairs to specific components as necessary. However, the replacement of these components is almost impossible due to the lack of floor space and accessibility. The main access to the mezzanine where the HVAC equipment is installed is a single ladder. There is an access panel at one end of the mezzanine that leads to a first-floor corridor, but it is currently blocked by one of the two HVAC units serving the pool room. Due to the age of the units and the inaccessibility for maintenance, it is recommended that they be demolished. An in depth structural review should be performed to verify if new roof top HVAC units can be installed above the pool room. It is also recommended that higher efficiency energy recovery units be utilized. This will allow for a higher amount of fresh air to be provided into the pool room and recovery of a portion of the heat from the exhausted air. In the pool room, the conditioned air is supplied at the ceiling and returned to the air handling unit from return grilles that span from the floor to ceiling (Photos 27 and 28). Typically, pool air is removed from the floor level only. Air removal at the floor level is an effective way to remove chloramines which tend to collect near the pool deck and water surface. Due to the size and shape of the return grilles, most of the air is being withdrawn from the room at the ceiling level. This 38303 Milton HS Pool Study 060118

June 1, 2018 Page 7 of 8 causes little to no air circulation at the pool deck level. It is recommended that the return air grilles be reconstructed to pull air from the pool deck only. Chloramines are the result of chlorine reacting with organic matter and ammonia in the pool water, causing the “chlorine” smell and increased corrosion. When the chloramine levels are high, shock chlorination is required. A “shock” treatment or breakpoint chlorination is when the pool is super chlorinated to raise the free available chlorine level to remove the chloramines from the pool water Originally the pool room was built as part of an exterior wall with entrance doors on the pool deck requiring additional heating by the exterior entrances. Photo 29 shows hot water room air heaters located where exterior doors used to exist. After building additions in the 1976 and 1998, the pool room is no longer located on an exterior wall so the additional heat registers are not required. It is recommended that the heaters be removed and the piping be concealed in the walls to prevent corrosion from causing damage to the piping system. The pool equipment room located adjacent to the pool room has a supply grille, but no exhaust. This can lead to high levels of chloramines in the air and humidity causing the equipment to corrode and mold to form. Corrosion exists on the metal pipe hangers and ceiling tile framing (Photo 30). HVAC design codes require that pool rooms and pool equipment rooms be negative to the adjacent rooms and corridors. One reason this is done is to reduce the chemical fumes and humidity that can circulate through these adjacent rooms, causing corrosion and damage. It was noted by the maintenance staff that the stair handrails and light fixtures outside of the pool equipment room have been recently replaced or repaired due to corrosion. It is recommended that an exhaust duct and fan be installed to circulate air through the equipment room and to make the equipment room negative to the nearby rooms. The pool HVAC equipment room located in the mezzanine above the pool equipment room has no air circulation. This can lead to high levels of chloramines in the air and humidity causing the equipment and structure to corrode and mold to form (Photos 31 and 32). It is recommended that an exhaust system be provided for the pool HVAC equipment room. The locker room HVAC equipment was replaced in 2017. If modifications to the locker room area occur to increase the size or add ADA fixtures, the current equipment will need to be evaluated for the increased demand and humidity. Proposed Improvements Proposed improvements depend on the desired time frame until a new pool is considered. Listed below are recommended improvements/ repairs to increase the lifespan of the current pool. Regardless of time frame for potential construction of a new swimming pool facility, the following improvements are recommended: Continued performance of annual maintenance work to maintain the pool and equipment Pool basin ADA improvements Locker room ADA improvements Locker room office lay-in ceiling replacement Replace pool room steel doors and frames Inspect the corrosion on the exposed roof structure and repair as necessary Repair the broken tile on the pool deck Remove and replace pool room wall tile with gyp and epoxy paint Asbestos removal pending further evaluation 38303 Milton HS Pool Study 060118

June 1, 2018 Page 8 of 8 Evaluate/repair the pool deck and pool basin settlement Restore the gutter lip to a level condition around the full pool perimeter Replace the pool perimeter gutter grating Repair pool basin broken tile, re-grout/waterproof to prevent further corrosion of reinforcing steel Replace starting blocks Provide battery operated ADA pool lift Replace pool main drain piping with PVC Modify the pool room return ductwork to return air from the deck level only Conduct testing and balancing of HVAC systems serving the pool and adjacent rooms to achieve a negative pressure condition to the pool room and pool equipment room New Swimming Pool Facility Construction within 5 years: Repair pool deck settlement and install deck drains Install pool area deck drains Pool basin repair to remove/replace corroded reinforcing steel Remove wall mounted automatic pool cover Replace pool main drain piping Install new rooftop HVAC equipment Implement recommended changes to the pool equipment room New Swimming Pool Facility Construction between 5 and 10 years from now: Install high rate sand filters to replace the DE filtration system Remove wall mounted automatic pool cover Install acoustic paneling Replace starting blocks Filter modifications to reduce the level of chloramines and humidity in the equipment room Repair/replace pool deck equipment If a new facility is not constructed within 10 years, the above improvements should occur along with additional improvements to address evolving programming/use requirements and continued degradation due to age/use. Note that there is no effective way to improve spectator seating capacity. Please do not hesitate in contacting our office with questions. Sincerely, RAMAKER & ASSOCIATES, INC. Daryl Matzke, P.E. Service Group Leader - Aquatics Attachments: Appendix A – Evaluation Photographs Appendix B – Rough Order of Magnitude Construction Estimate Appendix C – Asbestos Analysis Results, Performed by Environmental Management Consulting, Inc. Appendix D – Rock County Health Department Routine Annual Licensing Inspection Report, 5/15/18 38303 Milton HS Pool Study 060118

Appendix A Evaluation Photographs

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 1. VIEW OF POOL SHALLOW END. 2. VIEW OF POOL DEEP END. PROJECT NAME: PROJECT LOCATION: MILTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING POOL INSPECTION 114 W HIGH ST MILTON, WISCONSIN 53563 PROJECT NUMBER: ROCK COUNTY 38303

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 3. VIEW OF EXPOSED ROOF STRUCTURE IN POOL AREA. 4. VIEW OF CORROSION OF EXPOSED ROOF STRUCTURE. 5. VIEW OF TYPICAL MISSING POOL DECK TILE. 6. VIEW OF TYPICAL POOL AREA WALL TILE. 7. VIEW OF TYPICAL POOL AREA WALL TO FLOOR COVING. 8. VIEW OF POOL ROOM COMPETITOR SEATING. PROJECT NAME: PROJECT LOCATION: MILTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING POOL INSPECTION 114 W HIGH ST MILTON, WISCONSIN 53563 PROJECT NUMBER: ROCK COUNTY 38303

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 9. VIEW OF POOL ROOM SPECTATOR SEATING. 10. VIEW OF TYPICAL CORROSION ON POOL LADDER. 11. VIEW OF TYPICAL MISSING POOL BASIN TILE. 12. VIEW OF REPLACED GUTTER GRATING. 13. VIEW OF TYPICAL POOL ROOM ELECTRICAL BOXES. 14. VIEW OF POOL ROOM DOOR CORROSION. PROJECT NAME: PROJECT LOCATION: MILTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING POOL INSPECTION 114 W HIGH ST MILTON, WISCONSIN 53563 PROJECT NUMBER: ROCK COUNTY 38303

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 15. VIEW OF TYPICAL POOL START BLOCK. 16. VIEW OF WALL MOUNTED POOL COVERS. 17. VIEW OF TYPICAL POOL MAIN DRAIN COVER. 18. VIEW OF POOL VACUUM DE FILTER. 19. VIEW OF POOL SURGE TANK. 20. VIEW OF POOL RECIRCULATION PUMP. PROJECT NAME: PROJECT LOCATION: MILTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING POOL INSPECTION 114 W HIGH ST MILTON, WISCONSIN 53563 PROJECT NUMBER: ROCK COUNTY 38303

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 21. VIEW OF POOL HEATER. 22. VIEW OF CHEMICAL CONTROLLER AND ACID EQUIPMENT. 23. VIEW OF CHLORINE EQUIPMENT. 24. VIEW OF POOL ELECTRICAL PANELS. 25. VIEW OF ACCESS PATH TO HVAC UNIT IN ATTIC SPACE. 26. VIEW OF TYPICAL HVAC UNIT IN ATTIC SPACE. PROJECT NAME: PROJECT LOCATION: MILTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING POOL INSPECTION 114 W HIGH ST MILTON, WISCONSIN 53563 PROJECT NUMBER: ROCK COUNTY 38303

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 27. VIEW OF TYPICAL POOL ROOM CONDITIONED AIR SUPPLY. 28. VIEW OF POOL ROOM HVAC RETURN GRILLE. 29. VIEW OF TYPICAL POOL ROOM WALL HEATER. 30. VIEW OF TYPICAL PIPE HANGERS AND CEILING CORROSION. 31. VIEW OF TYPICAL CORROSION OF THE ATTIC STRUCTURE. 32. VIEW OF TYPICAL CORROSION OF THE HVAC EQUIPMENT. PROJECT NAME: PROJECT LOCATION: MILTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING POOL INSPECTION 114 W HIGH ST MILTON, WISCONSIN 53563 PROJECT NUMBER: ROCK COUNTY 38303

Appendix B Rough Order of Magnitude Construction Estimate

MILTON HIGH SCHOOL POOL STUDY ROUGH ORDER OF MAGNITUDE CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATE Friday, June 1, 2018 Milton High School Pool Repairs and Improvements Ramaker & Associates Project #38303 Summary of Proposed Improvements as Defined in the June 1, 2018 Milton HS Pool Study Pool and Pool Water Treatment Equipment - Repair corroded reinforcing steel in basin, repair pool basin tile, restore gutter lip elevation, replace gutter grating, replace starting blocks, ADA improvements, replace pool main drain piping w/ pvc, filter modifications, relocate pool chemicals. Natatorium - Locker room ADA improvements, locker office & pool operator office ceiling repair, pool room door replacement, repair exposed roof structure corrosion, pool deck tile repair, replace wall tile w/ gyp & epoxy paint, install pool room acoustic paneling, asbestos removal, repair deck settlement, repair deck/ wall coving, install pool area deck drains. HVAC - Replace pool room HVAC with roof mounted equipment, modify natatorium return ductwork, install pool room and equipment room exhaust, perform air balance and test. Pool and Pool Equipment Repair Corroded Steel in Basin Pool Basin Tile Repair Restore Gutter Lip Elevation Replace Gutter Grating Replace Starting Blocks ADA Improvements Replace Pool Main Drain Piping w/ PVC Abandon DE Filter/ Intall HRS Filters Relocate Pool Chemicals 50 SF Allowance 200 LF 210 LF 6 EA 1 EA Al

Pool deck equipment Pool main drain piping Pool filter system Pool surge tank Pool water treatment equipment Pool area HVAC system This Report provides a summary of concerns noted and improvement considerations. Photographs may be found in Appendix A for reference. Photos 1 and 2 provide an overall view of the pool room.

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