2002 Update Of The Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan And Short .

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2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan 2002 Update of the Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan and Short Term Work Program Planning Division Gwinnett County Department of Planning & Development 75 Langley Drive Lawrenceville, GA 30045 770-822-7600 Approved by the Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners February 25, 2003 C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 1

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan A RESOLUTION OF THE GWINNETT COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS ADOPTING THE 2002 UPDATE TO THE GWINNETT 2020 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN WHEREAS, the Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan, hereinafter referred to as "the Comprehensive Plan," provides a coordinated and comprehensive plan of the long-term goals, objectives, and priorities for Gwinnett County; and WHEREAS, the Comprehensive Plan supports five goals established by the state of Georgia pursuant to Official Code of Georgia Annotated 50-8-1 et seq, as follows: (a) Economic Development: To achieve a growing and balanced economy, consistent with all resources of this state and its various regions, that equitably benefits all sections of the state and all segments of the population. (b) Natural and Historic Resources: To conserve and protect the environmental, natural and historic resources of Georgia's communities, regions and the state. (c) Community Facilities: To ensure that public infrastructure facilities serving local governments, the region and the state have the capacity and are in place when needed to support and attract growth and development and/or maintain and enhance the quality of life of the residents of the state. (d) Housing: To ensure that all people within the state and its various regions and communities have access to adequate and affordable housing. (e) Land Use: To ensure that the land resources of the state are allocated for uses required to facilitate the topical areas of economic development, natural and historic resources, community facilities, and housing as outlined above, and to protect and promote the C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 2

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan quality of life of the people of Georgia's communities, regions, and the state. WHEREAS, in order for the Comprehensive Plan to remain responsive and relevant to changing conditions, the Implementation Strategies Element calls for an annual review of growth indicators and the preparation of an annual report of findings and recommendations for changes to the Comprehensive Plan; and WHEREAS, the minimum public hearing requirements prescribed by the Comprehensive Plan and state law have been met and exceeded; and WHEREAS, the Gwinnett County Government has completed a Five Year Short Term Work Program for the period 2003 to 2007, and WHEREAS, an annual report titled 2002 Update of Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan, which contains the Five Year Short Term Work Program, has been prepared following a duly advertised public hearing before the Municipal-Gwinnett County Planning Commission on February 18, 2003 and the Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners on February 25, 2003, at which Gwinnett County solicited community input on community needs and issues, as required by the state's Minimum Planning Standards and Procedures; and WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners finds that the proposed amendments to the Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan further the purposes of promoting the health, safety, morals, convenience, order, prosperity, aesthetics and general welfare of the present and future residents of Gwinnett County. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners does hereby submit the Five Year Short Term Work Program 2003-2007 to the Atlanta Regional Commission for Regional review, as per the requirements of the Georgia Planning Act of 1989; and C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 3

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan BE IT RESOLVED by the Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners that the 2002 Update of the Gwinnett 2020 Comprehensive Plan, dated February 25, 2003, shall be utilized by the Board of Commissioners, the Municipal-Gwinnett County Planning Commission and all Gwinnett County departments, agencies and officials as a guide in making decisions concerning the growth and development of Gwinnett County. ADOPTED this 25th day of February, 2003 GWINNETT COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS By: F. Wayne Hill, Chairman Date Signed: ATTEST: Brenda Maddox, County Clerk (Seal) APPROVED AS TO FORM: Van Stephens, Chief Assistant County Attorney C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 4

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan 2002 Update of the 2020 Gwinnett County Comprehensive Plan Executive Summary This document is the fifth update of the Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan since its original adoption on October 27, 1997. The update revises the comprehensive plan by amending the Population Element, the 2020 Land Use Plan Map, the Short Term Work Program, and the Land Use Element which includes the county’s land use policies. The Short Term Work Program (STWP) reports on the county’s comprehensive plan accomplishments for the past 5 years and identifies the current status of activities in the previous STWP. The updated STWP will describe the initiatives or programs to be put in place over the next five (5) years. A spreadsheet of past and future projects is located in the chapter. This report includes a “Table of Recommended Changes” to the 2020 Land Use Plan Map. The table includes all the recommended changes including consistency and municipal changes. Consistency changes reflect rezoning decisions, County land purchases and land development consistent with existing zoning. No Map Change Requests (MCRs) were submitted for consideration for this update. MCRs are applications from property owners to revise the land use designation shown on the Land Use Plan C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 5

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Map for their property. Legal notices were published in the Gwinnett Daily Post announcing a four (4) month window for filing MCR applications. Drafts of the update which include lists of all changes to the 2020 Land Use Plan Map and the proposed 2020 Land Use Plan Map itself, were made available for pubic viewing at all branches of the Gwinnett County Public Library and were posted on the county’s web site. C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 6

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Table of Contents I. Introduction A. Purpose B. Scope of Report Page II. Public Participation and Notification 1 1 2 III. Update of Population Element A. Population Growth Trends B. Population Diversity C. Summary 3 7 26 IV. Short Term Work Program (STWP) A. Report on Accomplishments B. Short Term Work Program 27 47 V. Update of Land Use Element A. 2020 Land Use Plan Map 1. Consistency changes 2. Map Change Requests (MCR) 3. County Purchases B. Update of the Existing Land Use Map C. Annexation Update 57 57 57 57 59 66 VI. Completed Special Studies by the Planning Division A. Growth Issues Steering Committee (GISC) B. Revitalization Task Force (RTF) C. Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) D. Mixed Use Redevelopment Overlay District 68 69 71 72 VI. Update Long Range Road Classification Map A. Purpose of the Long Range Road Classification Map B. Overview 74 C. Recommended Changes to the Map Appendices A. Changes to the Long Range Road Classification Map B. Changes to the Land Use Plan Map C. Race/Ethnic Characteristics, 1990 – 2000 change D. Land Use Categories, Existing Land Use Map 73 75 A-1 B-1 C-1 D-1 C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 7

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan I. Introduction A. Purpose This document is the fifth update of the Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan since its adoption on October 27, 1997. The Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan calls for an annual update with the intent of keeping the plan current to changing conditions. The Short Term Work Program of the Comprehensive Plan spells out the timetable and topics to be treated in each of the updates. This update revises the Comprehensive Plan by amending the Short Term Work Program, the Land Use Element, which sets forth the county’s land use policies, the Gwinnett County 2020 Land Use Plan Map, and the Long Range Road Classification Map. In addition, this update reports on several recent special studies and citizen participation. B. Scope of Report This 2002 Update of the Comprehensive Plan includes the following major sections: 1. Population Update – The Population Element is updated with current figures on race and ethnicity in the county. Numerous maps indicate the population changes by census tract from the 1990 Census. 2. Short Term Work Program (STWP) – The Minimum Standards and Procedures for Local Comprehensive Planning adopted by the Georgia Department of Community Affairs requires that the Short Term Work Program be updated every five (5) years. This report includes plan accomplishments from the previous STWP and describes initiatives or programs that are planned to address the needs of the community. 3. Land Use Policies – In the past year, Gwinnett County staff provided support to the Revitalization Task Force and the Growth Issues Steering Committee as they developed policy recommendations for the Board of Commissioners. Both committees have issued reports that are available to the public. 4. Consistency Issues – Consistency changes are revisions recommended to bring the 2020 Land Use Plan Map into compliance with other statements of county policy and recent development activity. These changes include property C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 8

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan developed under existing zoning in conflict with the plan, the dedication of recreation areas and open space in private developments, rezoning cases approved throughout the past year that changed a 2020 Land Use designation, and the acquisition of public lands. This report describes these changes, and a detailed list of these changes is presented in the Appendix. II. Public Participation and Notification The 2002 Update of the Gwinnett 2020 Comprehensive Plan had several public participation components. These are described below: July 2002 – A public announcement was made before the Planning commission and a public hearing was held before the Board of Commissioners to announce the opening of the Map Change Request (MCR) process. October 25, 2002 – Deadline for submission of MCR applications. None were submitted for this update. January 2003 – Draft copies of the report were made available for viewing at all branches of the Gwinnett County Public Library, in the office of the Department of Planning & Development at the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center, and on the county’s web site. February 2003 - Legal notices were published in the Gwinnett Daily Post advertising the update of the Comprehensive Plan and the opening of the Map Change Request application period. February 18 & 25, 2003 – Public hearings were held before the Planning Commission (February 18, 2003) and the Board of Commissioners (February 25, 2003) to complete the 2002 Comprehensive Plan Update. C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 9

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan III. Update of Population Element A. Population Growth Trends Gwinnett County has experienced dramatic population growth since 1970. In 1970, the county’s population totaled 72,349 persons and by the 2000 Census had increased 713% to 588,448 residents. Between 1970 and 1980, Gwinnett’s population increased 131% and 112% between 1980 and 1990. Although the rate of increase declined to 68% between 1990 and 2000, the net change in the county’s population was 235,538 persons. The latest available population estimates indicate that Gwinnett County has added over 50,000 new residents since 2000 and currently has a population of approximately 638,800 persons. The County’s growth and increasing density are shown below in Table III-1. Table III-1 Between 1970 and 1980, Gwinnett County Population Density 1970-2002 Gwinnett County was the second fastest growing Density county in Georgia and th Year Population Per Square Mile Per Acre advanced to the 8 1970 72,349 166 0.26 fastest growing in the United States. As 1975 115,400 264 0.42 Gwinnett County’s growth 1980 166,808 382 0.60 rate decreased during the 1985 249,600 571 0.90 1990s, Gwinnett dropped 1990 352,910 808 1.27 to the 31st fastest 1995 438,400 1,003 1.58 growing county in the 2000 588,448 1,347 2.12 nation. However with a 2002 638,800 1,462 2.31 net change of over Gwinnett County encompasses approximately 437 235,000 persons between square miles or 277,000 acres. 1990 and 2000, Gwinnett Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census th had the 17 largest Bureau; Atlanta Regional Commission. actual population increase among counties in the United States. Graph III-1 Regional Population Proportion 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1970 1980 1990 Gwinnett County 2000 2002 Over the last 30 years, Gwinnett County has experienced an average annual population increase of approximately 17,000 persons. Since 1970, Gwinnett’s average annual growth rate has ranged from lows of 2% and 4.4% between 1991 and 1993 to highs of 9.9% and 10.4% between 1983 and 1986. Atlanta Region C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 10

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Table III-2 (below) and Graph III-1 (preceding page) compare population growth trends among Gwinnett County, the ten-county Atlanta Region and the State of Georgia. Since 1970, Gwinnett County has attracted a significant portion of the growth in the Atlanta Region. Proportionally, Gwinnett County’s population growth has accounted for over one-quarter of the Atlanta Region’s population growth in the past three decades. Between 1970 and 2000, the regional population increased by 135% compared to Gwinnett County’s 713%. In 1970, five percent of the region’s population resided in Gwinnett County. By 2000, Gwinnett County’s proportion of the Atlanta Region’s population had increased to 17%. In addition Gwinnett County had accounted for 14% of the population growth in the state since 1970 and by 2000 approximately seven percent of Georgia’s total population were residents of Gwinnett. Table III-2 Population Trends 1970-2000 Percent Change Area Gwinnett Cty. 1970 72,349 1980 166,808 1990 352,910 2000 588,448 Atl. Region 1,458,400 1,815,440 2,361,447 3,429,379 Georgia 4,589,575 5,463,105 6,478,216 8,186,453 7080 8090 9000 7000 130 112 68 713 24 31 45 135 19 18 26 78 The Atlanta Region is composed of Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, and Rockdale counties. Figure III-1 and Figure III-2, on the following pages, depict the net and percent change between 1990 and 2000 in Gwinnett County’s total population by 1990 census tract. Census tracts are small, somewhat permanent statistical subdivisions of a county or equivalent area. The primary purpose of census tracts is to provide a relatively stable set of geographic units for the presentation of census data. Census tracts are split due to population growth or aggregated due to population decline. In Gwinnett County the number of census tracts increased from 45 in 1990 to 71 in 2000. Split tracts can be re-formed to construct the original census tract. As noted previously, Gwinnett’s population totaled 352,910 persons in 1990. By 2000 Gwinnett had a population of 588,448 persons - an increase of 235,538 persons or 67%. The largest net population gains occurred in the census tracts located in the central and northeastern areas of the county. The largest population change C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 11

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan occurred in census tract 505.03. This area northeast of Lawrenceville added over 22,000 new residents during the 1990s. C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 12

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Figure III-1 1990-2000 Total Population Net Change Net Change -79 0 - 5000 5000 - 10000 10000 - 15000 15000 - 20000 20000 - 22600 50101 50102 50601 50202 50204 50308 50503 50502 50307 50309 50310 50305 50306 50602 50314 50311 50304 50203 50313 50312 50507 50506 50409 50411 50407 50509 50505 50408 50406 50508 50410 50706 50413 50403 50705 50412 50710 50711 50707 50414 50415 50708 50704 50416 50709 October 21, 2002 Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2 0 2 4 Miles C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 13

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Figure III-2 1990-2000 Total Population Percent Change Percent Change -1.9 0 - 50 50 - 100 Over 100 50101 50102 50601 50202 50204 50503 50308 50502 50307 50309 50310 50305 50311 50304 50306 50203 50314 50602 50507 50313 50312 50506 50409 50505 50408 50411 50406 50407 50508 50509 50706 50410 50413 50705 50403 50707 50412 50710 50711 50414 50708 50415 50704 50416 50709 October 21, 2002 Source: U. S. Census Bureau 2 0 2 Miles C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 14

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Less but still significant population growth occurred throughout southeastern Gwinnett including the Harbins, Grayson, Loganville, Alcovy River, and Centerville areas. Several census tracts in southeast Gwinnett experienced population increases ranging from 5,000 to 10,000 persons. The largest population increase occurred in census tract 507.05 in the Grayson area. This census tract added over 9,300 new residents, almost tripling its population since 1990. The majority of the census tracts located in southwest Gwinnett including the Peachtree Corners, Norcross, Lilburn, Mountain Park, Stone Mountain, and Snellville areas experienced population increases of fewer than 5,000 persons. The southwestern section of Gwinnett is primarily developed with less vacant property available for residential development as compared to other areas of the county. As a result these areas experienced smaller population increases during the last decade. It should be noted that even though these population changes were smaller relative to the incredible growth that occurred in other areas of the county, most of the census tracts located in southwest Gwinnett still experienced substantial population increases. In fact, many tracts added thousands of new residents. One census tract 504.15 lost 79 persons. This census tract located adjacent to DeKalb County southwest of Stone Mountain Highway was the only tract in Gwinnett that experienced a decline in population. Small population gains occurred in several other census tracts located in southwest Gwinnett including 503.04 (Peachtree Corners), 503.10 and 503.11 (Norcross), 504.12 (Mountain Park), and 504.16 (Stone Mountain). All of these tracts had increases of less than 500 persons. While growth occurred in the vast majority of Gwinnett County during the 1990s, the county’s primary population growth pattern is fairly evident extending along the I-85, I-985 and Georgia Highway 316 corridors into the northeast and eastern-most portions of the county. B. Population Diversity Gwinnett County has become more racially diverse since 1970 as has the Atlanta Region as a whole. Gwinnett’s non-White population (non-White population category includes Black, Asian, American Indian and Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, and Other Race categories) increased 48% between 1970 and 1980, 563% between 1980 and 1990, and 296% between 1990 and C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 15

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan 2000. By comparison,1990 and 2000, the county’s overall population increase was 67% while its White population was only 33%. Regionally, the non-White population increased 74% during the 1990s while the non-White population grew by 36% in Georgia. Table III-3 compares changes in Gwinnett County’s non-White population proportions since 1970 with changes in the Atlanta Region and Georgia. Despite the percentage increase in the number of Gwinnett’s non-White residents since 1970, the county’s population has remained predominately white. Non-White residents comprised approximately five percent of Gwinnett’s total population in 1970. This proportion decreased throughout the seventies to three percent due in part to white flight from metropolitan Atlanta and in part to Gwinnett County’s attractiveness to new residents relocating to Atlanta. However this trend was reversed in the 1980s as Gwinnett’s non-White population grew to 11%. The growth in Gwinnett County’s non-White population was even greater during the 1990s and by 2000 over 25% of Gwinnett’s residents were non-White. Table III-3 Non-White Population Trends 1970-2000 1970 1980 1990 2000 Area Net Pro* Net Pro* Net Pro* Net Pro* Gwinnett 3,798 5.2 5,637 3.4 37,362 10.6 147,892 25.7 County Atlanta 391,150 22.2 495,796 27.3 777,924 32.9 1,350,054 40.1 Region Georgia 1,193,290 26.0 1,515,970 27.7 1,878,068 28.9 2,548,695 32.3 *Proportion Non-White population category includes Black, Asian, American Indian and Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, and other race categories. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, Summary File 1 (SF1) 2000 In contrast, the proportion of White persons to the total population in the Atlanta Region decreased steadily from 1970 to 2000. Since 1980, the Region’s proportion of non-White population has increased each year compared to the proportion of the state’s population. Despite the large increase in Gwinnett’s non-White population, these changes have been somewhat overshadowed by the large influx of white persons into the county since 1970. Thus, Gwinnett’s proportion of non-White persons to the total population remains significantly lower than the Atlanta Region or Georgia. Table III-4 presents the number and proportion of Gwinnett County’s population by race and Hispanic origin by decade since C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 16

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan 1970. During the 1990s, Gwinnett’s Black population increased by over 60,000 persons (333%). As a result, the proportion of Gwinnett’s Black population to the total population increased from 5% to 13%. In 2000 with over 78,000 persons, Black residents comprised Gwinnett County’s largest minority group accounting for over half of Gwinnett’s non-White population. Gwinnett County’s Asian population increased by over 32,000 persons (328%) during the 1990s. By 2000, over 42,000 Asians lived in Gwinnett and accounted for 7.2% of the county’s total population. Asians comprised 29% of Gwinnett’s non-White population in 2000. Gwinnett’s Hispanic population increased by over 56,000 persons (694%) between 1990 and 2000. By 2000, over 64,000 persons of Hispanic origin lived in Gwinnett County and accounted for 11% of the county’s total population. This is up from only two percent in 1990. In 2000, Gwinnett County was home to the largest Asian and Hispanic communities in the Atlanta Region. 1. Overall Increase in Minority Population While Gwinnett's total population increased by 67% between 1990 and 2000, the county’s minority population increased by 397%. As a result of this tremendous increase, the proportion of the minority population in Gwinnett grew from 11% to 31%. Persons in the other and two or more race categories comprised the remaining two percent of Gwinnett’s population. In comparison the minority population accounted for 43% of the Atlanta Region's total. DeKalb County had the largest minority population proportion - 66% followed by Clayton County with 63% and Fulton County with 53%. Forsyth County had the smallest minority population proportion – 7% followed closely by Cherokee County with 9%. Figure III-3 shows the net change between 1990 and 2000 in Gwinnett County’s minority population by 1990 census tract. Minority population increases occurred in all of Gwinnett’s 1990 census tracts with the tracts located in Norcross and east-central Gwinnett including the Duluth, Gwinnett Place Mall and Club Drive/Old Norcross Road areas experiencing the largest increases. For instance, the minority population in census tract 502.03 located in the Duluth area increased by over 11,000 persons while the minority population in tract 505.06 located in the Old Norcross Road/Club Drive area increased by over 15,000 persons. C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 17

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Figure III-3 1990-2000 Minority Population Net Change Net Change 168 - 3000 3000 - 6000 6000 - 9000 9000 - 12000 12000 - 15667 50101 50102 50601 50202 50204 50503 50308 50502 50307 50309 50314 50310 50305 50203 50311 50304 50313 50508 50506 50312 50409 50306 50505 50408 50406 50411 50407 50602 50509 50507 50706 50410 50413 50403 50705 50707 50412 50710 50711 50414 50708 50415 50704 50416 50709 October 21, 2002 2 0 2 4 Miles Soruce: U.S. Census Bureau C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 18

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Figure III-4 depicts the proportion of the minority population to the total population in Gwinnett County's 2000 census tracts. The large concentration of the minority population in southwest Gwinnett particularly in the I-85 corridor is evident. More specifically, census tracts located in the Peachtree Corners and Norcross areas and along I-85 had minority population proportions ranging from 52% to 81%. In particular census tract 504.18 bounded by I-85, Graves Road, South Norcross-Tucker Road and DeKalb County contained Gwinnett’s largest minority population proportion - 81%. Census tracts that contained minority populations ranging from 37% to 52% are located in the Duluth, Satellite Boulevard, Old Norcross Road, Cruse Road and Lilburn northwest of U.S. Highway 29 areas stretching into the Gwinnett Place Mall area and western Lawrenceville. There has been a significant increase in the minority population proportion in the census tracts located just west and southeast of Lawrenceville, the Berkeley Lake, Duluth, and Chattahoochee River areas and in the Centerville and Snellville areas. These census tracts have minority population proportions ranging from 23% to 37%. The remaining 29 census tracts in Gwinnett had minority population proportions ranging from 8.5% to 23%. These tracts stretched from Suwanee and Sugar Hill through Dacula, Harbins, Loganville, and Grayson to Snellville and Mountain Park. Census tract 507.05 located in the Grayson area had Gwinnett’s smallest minority population proportion – 8.5%. Figure III-5 shows the 1990-2000 change in Gwinnett’s minority population proportion. The minority population proportion increased in all of the county’s census tracts with the largest increases occurring in the areas bordering DeKalb and Fulton counties including Norcross, Peachtree Corners and Lilburn. The proportion increase in these census tracts ranged from 38 to 50 percentage points. For example, the minority population proportion in census tract 503.06 increased from 18.6% in 1990 to 68.7% in 2000 – a proportion increase of 50 points. C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 19

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Figure III-4 2000 Minority Population Proportion Of Total Population Proportion (Base 100) 8.5 - 23 23 - 37 37 - 52 52 - 66 66 - 81 501.03 501.05 501.04 501.06 506.03 Gwinnett Proportion 31.3 506.04 502.02 502.05 505.13 502.04 505.10 503.08 505.12 503.07 503.09 503.16 503.11 503.04 503.06 505.11 503.14 503.10 503.15 505.14 502.06 502.07 505.20 505.17 503.13 503.12 504.23 505.18 506.02 505.09 505.07 505.21 505.22 505.19 504.24 505.16 504.21 505.15 504.17 504.22 504.11 504.19 507.13 504.18 504.10 507.12 504.20 504.27 507.20 507.18 507.15 504.03 504.25 507.05 504.28 504.26 507.19 504.29 507.14 507.21 507.16 504.30 504.15 507.17 507.04 504.16 507.09 October 21, 2002 2 0 2 4 Miles Source: U.S. Census Bureau C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 20

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan Figure III-5 1990-2000 Net Change in Minority Population Proportion Of Total Population Net Change (Base 100) 4 - 15 15 - 27 27 - 38 38 - 50 50101 50102 Gwinnett Change 20.9 50601 50202 50503 50204 50308 50307 50502 50309 50602 50310 50305 50311 50304 50306 50203 50314 50313 50312 50507 50506 50505 50411 50407 50509 50409 50408 50406 50508 50706 50410 50413 50705 50403 50412 50710 50711 50707 50414 50415 50416 50708 50704 50709 October 21, 2002 2 0 2 Miles Source: U.S. Census Bureau C:\web site\Comp Plan\comprehensive plan 2002.doc Page 21

2002 Update Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan 2. Blacks Remain Gwinnett’s Largest Minority Group Blacks are Gwinnett's largest minority group, and 41% of the county’s minority population is comprised of Blacks. However this proportion has decreased from 48% in 1990 because of Gwinnett’s faster growing Hispanic and Asian populations. While Blacks continue to comprise the largest minority group in the Atlanta Region, the proportion of Blacks to the total minority population has declined from 86% to 73% since 1990 because of the extraordinary population increase of other minority groups. Figure III-6 shows the net change between 1990 and 2000 in Gwinnett County’s Black population by 1990 census tract. The Black population increased in all of Gwinnett County’s census tracts during the 1990s with the exception of census tract 503.11. This census tract encompassing downtown Norcross lost 11 Black residents b

Comprehensive Plan since its adoption on October 27, 1997. The Gwinnett County 2020 Comprehensive Plan calls for an annual update with the intent of keeping the plan current to changing conditions. The Short Term Work Program of the Comprehensive Plan spells out the timetable and topics to be treated in each of the updates.

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