2013 Diabetes And Eye Disease Fact Sheet - Georgia Department Of Public .

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The Georgia Department of Public Health 2013 Diabetes and Eye Disease Fact Sheet Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among United States adults. 1-3 As Georgia’s population ages and diabetes prevalence increases, eye disease will continue to be a major public health problem leading to blindness and reduced quality of life. Compared to adults without diabetes, adults with diabetes have a greater prevalence of many visual impairment-related diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma.4 Diabetic retinopathy, characterized by the degradation of retinal blood vessels, has no warning and can interfere with living well.5,6 Successfully managing glucose control and receiving a routine comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year can reduce the risk of eye disease by 54% to 76% and lead to the early detection of eye disease.7,8 VISUAL IMPAIRMENT AMONG ADULT DIABETICS IN GEORGIA In 2010, among adult diabetics in Georgia, an estimated*: 9.1% (55,200 adults) were informed by an eye doctor or other healthcare professional that they had glaucoma 17.6% (107,700 adults) were informed by an eye doctor or other healthcare professional that they had cataracts 4.9% (30,000 adults) were informed by an eye doctor or other healthcare professional that they had age-related macular degeneration** Map 1. Prevalence of Retinopathy among Adult Georgia Diabetics by Health District, 2008-2010 In 2011, an estimated 20.6% of Georgia adult diabetics, or 154,500 persons, were told by a doctor that diabetes had affected their eyes or that they had retinopathy. The following Public Health Districts had the greatest prevalence of retinopathy during 2008-2010(Map 1): 3-3 (Clayton) at 24.7%, or 3,400 persons 3-4 (Lawrenceville) at 30.0%, or 14,500 persons 8-1 (Valdosta) at 28.2%, or 7,000 persons 8-2 (Albany) at 26.3%, or 9,300 persons *Data Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2010) **Only adults 40 years of age or older 2 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, Ga 30303 health.state.ga.us March 2013

2013 Diabetes and Eye Disease Fact Sheet ANNUAL DILATED EYE EXAMS Many causes of visual impairment are readily diagnosed and at least 40% of blindness and visual impairment is treatable or preventable.6,9 Due to the impact of eye disease on diabetics, Healthy People 2020 has the following objective: Increase the proportion of adults with diabetes who obtain an annual dilated eye examination.10 Time since Last Dilated Eye Exam among Adult Diabetics in Georgia, 2011 Percent Estimated Number of % (95% CI) Diabetics Less than 1 year Between 1 and 2 years More than 2 years 66.5 (59.2, 73.2) 17.1 (12.3, 23.3) 16.3 (10.9, 23.7) 472,600 121,600 116,000 Data Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2011) In 2011, the percentage of adult diabetics in Georgia who had a dilated eye examination (66.5%) within the previous 12 months was greater than the Healthy People 2020 target percentage of 58.7%. Geography The following Public Health Districts had the lowest prevalence of adult diabetics who had received a dilated eye exam in the previous 12 months: 5-1 (Dublin) at 50.5%, or 4,300 persons 1-2 (Dalton) at 64.2%, or 16,300 persons 9-2 (Waycross) at 65.0%, or 15,600 persons 5-2 (Macon) at 65.6%, or 24,200 persons 8-2 (Albany) at 67.6%, or 22,200 persons The following Public Health Districts had the highest prevalence of adult diabetics who had received a dilated eye exam in the previous 12 months: 3-2 (Fulton) at 77.5%, or 29,000 persons 3-4 (Lawrenceville) at 82.3%, or 38,500 persons 3-5 (DeKalb) at 80.0%, or 26,000 persons 7 (Columbus) at 82.0%, or 23,800 persons Map 2. Prevalence of Annual Dilated Eye Exam among Adult Georgia Diabetics by Health District, 2008-2010

2013 Diabetes and Eye Disease Fact Sheet Time Trend Figure 1. Prevalence (%) of Annual Dilated Eye Exams among Georgia Adult Diabetics by Year, 2000‐2010 Prevalence (%) 80 68 71 72 70 71 69 69 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 74 70 74 71 2009 2010 60 40 20 0 2007 2008 Year Data Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2000-2010) Between 2000 and 2010, the percentage of adult diabetics in Georgia who received an annual dilated eye exam did not increase significantly. (Figure 1) Demographics Figure 2. Prevalence (%) of Annual Dilated Eye Exams among Georgia Adult Diabetics by Demographics, 2011 Prevalence (%) 80 71 74 63 65 66 62 Female White, Non‐ Hispanic Black, Non‐ Hispanic 45‐64 60 40 20 0 Male Gender Race/Ethnicity Demographic 65 Age Group* (years) *Sample size too small to provide reliable estimates for adults less than 45 years of age There were no significant differences in the prevalence of annual dilated eye exams among adult Georgia diabetics by gender, race/ethnicity, or age group. (Figure 2)

2013 Diabetes and Eye Disease Fact Sheet Figure 3. Prevalence (%) of Annual Dilated Eye Exams among Georgia Adult Diabetics by Sociodemographic Measures, 2011 Prevalence (%) 80 60 72 78 73 69 78 72 66 59 59 53 77 46 40 20 Education Annual Income Employment Status* No Health Coverage Any Health Coverage Other** Unable to Work Out of Work Employed Greater than 50,000 25,000 ‐ 50,000 Less than 25,000 Some college or more High School Graduate Less than High School 0 Insurance Status* Sociodemographic Measure *Data from 2009 and 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System **Other Employment Status includes homemakers, students, and retired individuals Data Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2009, 2010, 2011) Adult diabetics that were high school graduates (71.7%; 151,700 persons) or had completed some college or more (73.4%; 202,000 persons) had a 35% and 38% greater prevalence, respectively, of having had an annual dilated eye exam than diabetics that had not graduated from high school. Compared to diabetics in households with annual incomes less than 25,000 (58.7%; 194,000 persons), diabetics in households with annual incomes greater than 50,000 (78.3%; 96,340 persons) had 33% greater prevalence of having had an annual dilated eye exam. Compared to diabetics out of work (58.7%; 22,500), employed diabetics (71.9%; 180,000) had 22% greater prevalence of having had an annual dilated eye exam. Adult diabetics in Georgia without health coverage (46%; 40,900 persons) had a 40% lower prevalence of having had an annual dilated eye exam than those with any health coverage (76.7%; 435,700 persons). (Figure 3)

2013 Diabetes and Eye Disease Fact Sheet BARRIERS TO RECEIVING EYE CARE Figure 4. Primary Reason for Not Visiting an Eye Care Professional in the Past 12 Months, Georgia Adult* Diabetics, 2010 2% 24% Cost/Insurance 34% Unable to get to office/clinic Unable to get an appointment No reason to go Have not thought of it 7% Other 3% 29% Do not have/know an eye doctor 1% *Only adults 40 years of age or older Data Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2010) Among adult diabetics in Georgia, cost or insurance (34%; 58,000 persons) is the most cited reason for not visiting an eye care professional in the previous 12 months. 29% (48,000 persons) of Georgia adult diabetics stated that they had no reason to go to an eye care professional or did not have a problem. NATIONAL EYE DISEASE PREVENTION RECOMMENDATIONS Every percentage point decrease in A1c values can reduce the risk of diabetes‐related eye, kidney and nerve disease complications by 40%.7 The development of severe vision loss due to diabetic eye disease can be reduced by an estimated 50% to 60% through scatter laser therapy.1 o Laser therapy works best in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy o Annual dilated eye exams allow eye care professionals to detect diabetic retinopathy in the earlier stages11 Appropriate eyeglasses may be able to help approximately 65% of adults with diabetes and poor vision.1 The progression of diabetic retinopathy may be prevented through control of blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol.11

2013 Diabetes and Eye Disease Fact Sheet REFERENCES 1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Diabetes Translation, “National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011” (Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs 2011.pdf) National Institutes of Health, National Eye Institute: (Available at: .asp ) 3 Kempen JH, O’Colmain BJ, Leske MC, Haffner SM, Klein R, Moss SE, et al. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among adults in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2004, 122(4): 552-563. 4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Diabetes Translation, Vision Health Initiative (Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth/data/national.htm ) 5 Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. “Living Well with Chronic Illness: A Call For Public Health Action.” Committee on Living Well with Chronic Disease: Public Health Action to Reduce Disability and Improve Functioning and Quality of Life. (Available at: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record id 13272 ) 6 Prevent Blindness America and National Eye Institute, “Vision Problems in the U.S.: Prevalence of Adult Vision Impairment and Age-Related Eye Disease in America Report.” 2012. (Available at: www.visionproblemsus.org ) 7 American Diabetes Association. “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes.” 2012. (Available at: ment 1/S11.full.pdf html ) 8 Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). The Effect of Intensive Treatment of Diabetes on the Development and Progression of Long-Term Complications in InsulinDependent Diabetes Mellitus. New England Journal of Medicine, 329(14), September 30, 1993. (Results available here: EDIC 508.pdf ) 9 Congdon N, O’Colmain B, Klaver CCW, Klein R, Muñoz B, Friedman D, et al. “Causes and prevalence of visual impairment among adults in the United States.” Archives of Ophthalmology. 2004; 122: 477-485. 10 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “Healthy People 2020.” (Available at: 2020/default.aspx ) 11 National Institutes of Health, National Eye Institute: (Available at: ino.pdf ) 2

The development of severe vision loss due to diabetic eye disease can be reduced by an estimated 50% to 60% through scatter laser therapy.1 o Laser therapy works best in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy o Annual dilated eye exams allow eye care professionals to detect diabetic retinopathy in the earlier stages11

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