BAS-PRC005-EN (0903): Tracer Summit Building Control Unit Sizing For .

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Engineering Bulletin Building Control Unit Sizing for Version 17 Tracer Summit Systems Use this bulletin to determine the number of building control units (BCUs) required to meet the specifications of a Tracer Summit application. The information in this bulletin pertains to Tracer Summit Version 17 software. Future enhancements to the Tracer Summit system may change the capabilities described in this bulletin. This bulletin complements the Tracer Summit service literature. For more information on installation and programming, refer to the Tracer Summit user guides. BAS-PRB005-EN

Overview The Tracer Summit BCU is designed to be a multi-tasking, flexible, and data-rich system controller. It has an object-oriented database that allows easy access to vast amounts of information from unit control modules (UCMs) and other objects. Like any computer, the BCU has limits for processing and memory capacity. Each of the connected Trane UCMs, as well as the userselected application programs, consume some of the available capacity. All of the intended uses of a BCU need to be considered to determine if the BCU has sufficient capacity to meet those needs. 2006 American Standard Inc All rights reserved. Many of the measurements listed in this bulletin are estimates because it is impossible to anticipate exactly how you will be applying a Tracer Summit system. In most cases, the estimates are adequate to determine BCU capacity, but some caution is advised for large or unusual applications. Contact GCS Product Support in St. Paul for assistance with unusual applications. The following pages provide information and guidelines to help assess the needs of a particular project so that the proper quantity of BCUs is selected and applied efficiently and effectively. The following are trademarks or registered trademarks of American Standard: CenTraVac, Horizon, IntelliPak, Rover, Thermostat Control Module (TCM), Tracer, Tracer Summit, Trane, TraneNet, UCP2, VariTrac, VariTrane, and Voyager. The following are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies or organizations: BACnet of ASHRAE; LonTalk and LonMark of Echelon Corporation; and Windows and Microsoft of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other countries. BAS-PRB005-EN

Contents Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BCU models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tracer Summit architecture . . . . . . . . . . . Objects and properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4 5 7 Input/output objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 UCM objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Application objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Seven-step procedure for BCU sizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 NVM (non-volatile memory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 VM (volatile memory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 CPU (central processing unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Step 1: Determine the number of UCMs . . . . . . . . . 8 Step 2: Consider the building layout . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Step 3: Determine special input/output object needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Step 4: Account for system communications . . . . 14 Step 5: Determine application program requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Step 6: Account for future enhancements . . . . . . . 17 Step 7: Use a BCU sizing tool to determine capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Spreadsheet for BCU sizing . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Using the sizing spreadsheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Project parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determine the number of UCMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consider the building layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determine special input object needs . . . . . . . . . . . Account for system communications . . . . . . . . . . . Determine application program requirements . . . Account for future enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BAS-PRB005-EN 21 21 21 22 22 22 22 3

BCU models Any of four different BCU models may be running on your site. coexist on a site with the older BMTW and BMTS BCUs. BMTX BCU BMTW BCU The BMTX BCU was released with the Tracer Summit Version 16 software. The BMTX BCU has several advantages over the BMTW BCU, including increased performance and reliability. The BMTW BCU was released with the Tracer Summit Version 11 software in February 2000. The BMTW BCU has more capacity than the enhanced BMTS BCU. The BMTW BCU comes in two models: standard capacity and high capacity. The standard capacity BMTW BCU is upgradeable to a high capacity BMTW BCU. The BMTX BCU offers a single model with the following integrated features: Ethernet, EIA-232 BACnet, four UCM communication links (one Comm3 isolated, two Comm4, one LonTalk), and highcapacity memory. Options include modem and operator display. Enhanced BMTS BCU Beginning with the Tracer Summit Version 4.0 software release in June 1995 through January 2000, all BCU shipments were the enhanced model, which had increased performance and capacity. Upgraded BMTS BCU BMTS BCUs shipped prior to June 1995 can be upgraded to Version 6.0 software. Upgraded BMTS BCUs have Version 6 features and some increase in capacity. However, they do not have the same capacity as enhanced BMTS BCUs. The BMTW BCU supports BACnet/IP, an optional I/O module, an optional BCU operator display, and an additional UCM communication card slot with support for LonTalk devices. This bulletin focuses on BMTX BCUs; however, BMTX BCUs can How to identify your BCU Table 1 summarizes the differences among the various BCU models. Table 1: Differences among BCU models BMTX BCU 4 BMTW BCU with operator display BMTW BCU Enhanced BMTS BCU Upgraded BMTS BCU Ship date North American version: 7/20/04 or later EC version: 9/29/04 or later North American version: 7/1/2000 or later EC version: 6/4/2001 or later 2/1/00 to present 6/1/95 to 2/1/00 Prior to 6/1/95 Model number BMTX 001 AAA BMTW 000 Digit 21 1 BMTW 000 BMTS 000 AAB Digit 10 B BMTS 000 AAA Digit 10 A Serial number North American version: E04G00000 EC version: E04J000000 North American version: E00G05000 EC version: E01F00000 N/A N/A N/A Main circuit board part number 50100922 50100856 50100856 50100837 50100736 Main circuit board color Green Green Green Blue Green Number of UCM comm links 1 Isolated Comm3 2 Comm4 1 LonTalk Up to 4 Up to 4 Up to 3 Up to 3 BAS-PRB005-EN

Tracer Summit architecture The Tracer Summit building automation system (BAS) provides building control through a single, integrated system. Climate, lighting, scheduling, energy consumption, and other controllable features of a building can all be programmed and managed by a Tracer Summit BAS. The system consists of BCUs, UCMs, PC workstations, and Tracer Summit software. The Tracer Summit system uses highspeed, distributed processing on a local area network (LAN) to operate the components as one system. The Tracer Summit hardware architecture allows UCMs to be connected to BCUs. Multiple BCUs can be connected as needed to control various types and sizes of applications. The operator interface is provided by one or more PC workstations and/or by the optional BCU operator display. BCUs and PC workstations are connected by Ethernet LAN or by a shared (Internet protocol) network (Figure 1 on page 6). In addition, a remote PC workstation can be connected to the system through an optional 56k modem installed in one or more of the BCUs in the system. with other BCUs and PC workstations fails. The PC workstation is the primary operator interface for the Tracer Summit system. Multiple PC workstations can be directly connected on the LAN, as can one PC workstation connected remotely to a BCU through a modem. Each PC workstation provides a graphical interface to system information. From the PC workstation, the operator has the ability to create and edit system data, view current and trend information, acknowledge alarms, and perform operator overrides. The BCU operator display is an optional operator interface for the Tracer Summit system. It has a liquid crystal display (LCD) touch screen and can serve as a standalone operator interface between the user and the building automation system (BAS) equipment. It enables the occasional daily user to perform most Tracer Summit daily activities at the BCU, such as checking system status information, changing time-of-day schedules, handling alarms and events, and performing operator overrides. A Tracer Summit BCU is a control panel that communicates with multiple UCMs using up to four communication links. The BCU scans all UCMs to update information and coordinate control of the building. Each BCU contains its own unique set of application and monitoring programs to maintain comfort and control of the building, even if communication BAS-PRB005-EN 5

Figure 1: Tracer Summit architecture Additional PC Workstations or BCUs Operator interface PC Workstation Unit control LCP via LCP supervisor TCM Ethernet connection PCM RTA/RTW* VariTrac II CCP Scroll chiller* Ethernet connection Commercial Self-Contained Isolated Comm3 link (1) IntelliPak* UCP2 UPCM Only 4 UCM Comm4 link (up to 2) communication links can be used on each BCU. Able to connect to existing IP LAN TUC Horizon absorption chiller VAV II, III, IV LonTalk link (1) Voyager* BCU with operator display Precedent* Ethernet connection Tracer ZN controllers Building control Remote PC Workstation Tracer AH controllers Tracer Loop Controller Tracer MP controllers Generic LonTalk devices LCI–C (Chillers) Tracer V V controllers Additional BCUs or PC Workstations *This UCM can communicate on other links besides the one shown. See Table 1 in the Tracer Summit Software Versions engineering bulletin (BAS-PRB006-EN) for more details. 6 BAS-PRB005-EN

Objects and properties The Tracer Summit system is based on the concept of objects. Objects are created by the operator and used to define elements of the system. The Tracer Summit system uses an object-oriented database to perform tasks and applications. All inputs, outputs, UCMs, applications, and graphics are recognized as objects by this database. Each object has characteristic information (or properties) that may be viewed, referenced, and applied throughout the Tracer Summit system. Properties exist in the database so that the system programmer can access and apply them to the various applications without having to map over points (a process required in other systems). For example, if the leaving chilled water temperature from a centrifugal chiller is needed as a dynamic value on a graphic display, the system programmer uses that property as a reference from the database versus creating an analog input that indexes the property. Note: A complete list of the objects and their associated properties (along with descriptions) are available in the electronic reference library that ships with the Tracer Summit software. Input/output objects Input/output objects can be analog inputs, binary inputs, analog outputs, or binary outputs. Inputs reference their present value from other objects in the system— typically, UCMs. Outputs are used to control setpoint values or relay BAS-PRB005-EN outputs to other objects in the system. For example, using the Analog Input editor, an analog input object can be created to reference a temperature sensor. The following are some typical properties and their values for this analog input object: Property Value Name Gym temperature Present Value 75 Units Degrees F High Alarm Limit 80 Low Alarm Limit 60 UCM objects UCM objects can be created for the Trane unit controllers listed in Table 3 on page 9. The properties associated with UCM objects typically allow the operator to view and edit all characteristics of a piece of equipment. The following are a few of over 100 typical properties and their values for a Chiller (LonTalk) object: Property Value Name Chiller #1 Present Value Occupied Chilled Water Temp: Leaving 45 Chiller Type CVH Application objects Applications on the Tracer Summit system, such as area control, time of day scheduling, calculation objects, custom programming language (CPL) routines, and site security are also recognized as objects by the database. Application objects typically have specific properties that relate to their operation. 7

Seven-step procedure for BCU sizing Several factors need to be taken into account when determining the capacity of a BCU. The usage factors used in the BCU sizing spreadsheet were calculated from actual Tracer Summit installations. The sizing spreadsheet is intended to give estimates of the capacity of a BCU. The sizing spreadsheet uses three types of measurement of BCU processor capacity: NVM, VM, and CPU usages. All three measurements must be considered to properly determine BCU loading. NVM (non-volatile memory) NVM is the BCU memory in which the setup parameters for objects are stored. The parameters stored in NVM are maintained indefinitely and are also referred to as the BCU database. In Tracer Summit, the NVM component of the BCU is represented by the device property “Percent BCU NVM Available.” communication and control tasks. All of the work done by a BCU is done by the CPU. In Tracer Summit, the CPU component of the BCU is represented by the device property “Percent Processor Idle Time.” The value of this property is valid for the first 5 minutes after a BCU reset (BMTX BCU requires reset only; BMTW BCU requires either clearing RAM or controlling from a graphic using setpoint control to 0.0). Follow this seven-step procedure when determining the number of BCUs required for a specific application. Go to the page cited at each step for a detailed explanation of that step: 1 Determine the number of UCMs (page 8). 2 Consider the building layout (page 13). 3 Determine special input/output object needs (page 14). 4 Account for system communications (page 14). VM (volatile memory) VM is the BCU memory in which current and historical data is stored, such as UCM data from the last scan and trends. In the event of a power outage, VM data is backed up for 7 days by a super capacitor in the BCU. In Tracer Summit, the VM component of the BCU is represented by the device property “Percent BCU VM Available.” CPU (central processing unit) CPU refers to the BCU processor, which performs various 8 5 Determine application program requirements (page 15). 6 Account for future enhancements (page 17). 7 Complete sizing spreadsheet to maximum quantity of each type of UCM can be connected to each BCU. Refer to the Table 3 on page 9 for information on link sizing. Each connected UCM device has BCU usage factors that need to be considered. Refer to the BCU sizing for BMTW and BMTX spreadsheets, which are available on TraneNet. Each UCM communication link also has base usage factors in addition to the individual UCM usage factors. Isolated Comm3, Comm4, and LonTalk links can have a mixture of different types of UCMs, so the following rules must be used when determining the individual link capacities. Comm3 link sizing Multiple UCM devices can be combined on a single, isolated Comm3 link provided that the total link scan time does not exceed the specified limit. Each UCM type has a scan time, which is the time required for the BCU to scan each device. The link-loading limit is based on a maximum total scan time of 60 seconds for all devices on the link. If the link is loaded in less than the specified limit, the total scan time is reduced accordingly, down to a minimum of 10 seconds. determine capacity (page 17). Step 1: Determine the number of UCMs A BMTX BCU can have one isolated Comm3, two Comm4, and one LonTalk UCM communication link. A maximum quantity of each type of UCM can be connected to each communication link (Figure 1 on page 6). Additionally, a BAS-PRB005-EN

Table 4 on page 11 summarizes the UCM quantities per link and per BCU and the scan times per device for Comm3 links. Table 2: Formula for sizing Comm3 links Quantity TCMs 1 second Quantity PCMs 1.5 seconds Use the formula in Table 2 to determine if a given quantity and mix of UCMs will fit on a link, add the scan times for each device and verify that the total is less than the limit of 60 seconds. Quantity RTA-RTWs 2 seconds Quantity scroll chillers 1 second Quantity CSCs 1.5 seconds Quantity LCPs 1 second 60 seconds total scan time Table 3: UCM communication link sizing for BMTX BCU Maximum UCMs Comm link type Comm3 Comm4 BAS-PRB005-EN UCM device Object per link per BCU Commercial Self-Contained (CSC) Commercial Self-Contained (CSC) 20 20 Lighting Control Panel (LCP) Lighting Control Panel (LCP) 8 8 Programmable Control Module (PCM) Programmable Control Module (PCM) 30 30 RTA-RTW Series R chiller (RTA/RTW) 10 10 Scroll chiller Scroll chiller (CGA/CGW) 10 10 Thermostat control module (TCM) Thermostat control module (TCM) 60 60 Trane Europe chiller (TEC) Trane Europe chiller 10 10 VariTrac II CCP VariTrac II Central Control Panel (CCP) 6 6 Voyager rooftop Voyager rooftop (Comm3) 32 32 Horizon absorption chiller Horizon absorption chiller 10 10 IntelliPak IntelliPak rooftop 20 20 Terminal Unit Controller (TUC) Terminal Unit Controller 64 128 UCP2 Absorption chiller (UCP2) Centrifugal chiller (UCP2) Helical rotary chiller (UCP2) 10 10 UPCM Universal PCM 10 10 VAV II/III/IV VariTrane UCM II/III/IV 63 126 Voyager rooftop Voyager rooftop 32 32 Wireless receiver Wireless receiver 8 8 9

Table 3: UCM communication link sizing for BMTX BCU (continued) Maximum UCMs Comm link type LonTalk 10 UCM device Object per link per BCU Generic LonTalk Device (GLD) Generic LonTalk Device (GLD) 40 40 IntelliPak Commercial Self-Contained (CSC) (LCI-I) Discharge Air Controller (DAC) 20 20 IntelliPak Commercial Self-Contained (CSC) (LCI-I) Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 IntelliPak fresh-air unit (FAU) (LCI-I) Discharge Air Controller (DAC) 20 20 IntelliPak rooftop (LCI-I) Discharge Air Controller (DAC) 20 20 IntelliPak rooftop (LCI-I) Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Odyssey (ReliaTel controls) (LCI-R) Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Precedent rooftop (ReliaTel controls) (LCI-R) Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer AH540/541 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer AH540/541 Discharge Air Controller (DAC) 20 20 Tracer CH530/531 (LCI-C) Chiller (LonTalk) 10 10 Tracer Loop Controller Tracer Loop Controller (TLC) 1 1 Tracer MP501 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer MP501 Generic LonTalk Device (GLD) 40 40 Tracer MP503 Generic LonTalk Device (GLD) 40 40 Tracer MP580/581 MP580/581 20 20 Tracer VV550/551 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer ZN510/511 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer ZN520/521 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer ZN517 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer ZN523 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Tracer ZN524 Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Voyager Commercial (ReliaTel controls) (LCI-R) Discharge Air Controller (DAC) 20 20 Voyager Commercial (ReliaTel controls) (LCI-R) Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 Voyager rooftop (LCI-V) Space Comfort Controller (SCC) 120 120 BAS-PRB005-EN

Table 4: Comm3 link parameters for BMTX BCU UCM device Max per BCU Scan time per device Table 5: Calculating Comm3 scan time (example) 15 TCMs 1 sec 15 sec 5 PCMs 1.5 sec 7.5 sec 2 RTA-RTW 2 sec 4 sec Table 6: Formula for sizing Comm4 links Quantity TUCs 0.5 seconds CSC 20 1.5 sec LCP** 8 1 sec 3 scroll chillers 1 sec 3 sec PCM 30 1.5 sec 2 CSCs 1.5 sec 3 sec RTAA-RTWA (Tracer CH530) 10 2 sec 3 LCPs 1 sec 3 sec Quantity VAV II/III/IVs 1 second Total scan time 10 1 sec TCM 60 1 sec Comm4 link sizing Trane Europe chiller 10 2 sec VariTrac II CCP 6 10 sec Voyager 32 1 sec Comm3 link 1 N/A Up to 64 UCM devices can be combined on a single Comm4 link provided that the total link scan time does not exceed the specified limit. Each UCM type has a scan time, which is the time required for the BCU to scan each device. The link loading limit is based on a maximum total scan time of 63 seconds for all devices on the link. If the link is loaded in less than the specified limit, the total scan time is reduced accordingly, down to a minimum of 10 seconds. *Note: Includes IntelliPak chiller **Note: LCPs can be connected to a link only through a supervisor panel. The parameters above include a supervisor panel. For the example in Table 5, a Comm3 link with 15 TCMs, 5 PCMs, 2 RTAA-RTWA chillers, 3 scroll chillers, 2 CSCs, and 3 LCPs has a total scan time of approximately 35.5 seconds. Note: The minimum scan time is 10 seconds, so unloading links below 10 seconds total scan time does not improve performance. BAS-PRB005-EN Quantity UPCMs 3 seconds Quantity UCP2 3 seconds 35.5 sec Scroll chiller* Maximum total scan time per link 60 seconds For the example in Table 7, a Comm4 link with 2 UPCMs, 10 TUCs, 20 VAVs, and 6 Voyagers has a total scan time of 31 seconds. Table 9 summarizes the UCM quantities, scan times, and BCU usage factors for Comm4 links. Use Table 6 to determine if a given quantity and mix of UCMs will fit on a link, add the scan times for each device, and verify that the total is less than the limit of 63 seconds. In addition, each type of UCM must be within its individual limits, and the total number of devices on the link must be 64 or less. Quantity IntelliPaks 1 second Quantity Voyager rooftops 0.5 second 63 seconds total scan time 64 total devices (including wireless receiver) Table 7: Calculating Comm4 scan time (example) 2 UPCMs 3 sec 6 sec 10 TUCs 0.5 sec 5 sec 20 VAVs 1 sec 20 sec 6 Voyagers 0.5 sec 3 sec Total scan time 31 sec To maximize BCU capacity, use the minimum number of links fully loaded. To maximize performance (scan time), use more links that are lightly loaded. Note: The minimum scan time is 10 seconds, so unloading links below 10 seconds total scan time does not improve performance. 11

Table 9: Comm4 link parameters for BMTX BCU LonTalk link sizing Table 8 on page 12 summarizes the UCM quantities and BCU usage factors for LonTalk links. LonTalk links do not have scan times because each device automatically reports a change of state to the BCU. UCM device Max per link Max per BCU Scan time per device Horizon absorption chiller 10 10 3 sec IntelliPak 20 20 1 sec TUC 64 128 0.5 sec Note: LonTalk links are limited to UCP2 10 10 3 sec 120 devices. UPCM 10 10 3 sec Tracer Summit supports the following LonMark HVAC Functional Profiles: Space Comfort Controller (SCC), Discharge Air Controller (DAC), and Chiller. A Tracer Summit system can support four categories of controllers on its LonTalk communication link: VAV II/III/IV 63 126 1 sec Voyager rooftop 32 32 0.5 sec Wireless receiver 8 8 N/A N/A 2 N/A Trane controllers that follow the supported profiles Non-Trane controllers that follow the supported profiles Trane controllers that do not conform to the supported profiles Non-Trane controllers that do not conform to the supported profiles Table 8: LonTalk link parameters for BMTX BCU UCM device Max per BCU DAC 20 GLD 40 SCC 120 Tracer CH530/531 (LCI-C) 10 Tracer Loop Controller 1 Tracer MP580/581 controller 20 LonTalk link 1 Note: A LonTalk link repeater must be used when more than 60 devices are connected to a link. 12 Comm4 link Maximum total scan time per link 63 seconds Maximum number of devices per link 64 Trane controllers that follow the supported profiles These controllers are configured to follow a standard LonMark profile. Using a profile is the quickest way to install and commission a controller in Tracer Summit. LonMark profiles supported by the Tracer Summit system include SCC, DAC, and Chiller. See Table 3 on page 9 for more information about which profiles can be used for the various LonTalk controllers. Non-Trane controllers that follow the supported profiles Tracer Summit also supports controllers from other suppliers that follow the LonTalk SCC, DAC, and Chiller profiles. In addition, controllers that follow legacy terminal profiles can be supported as SCCs. Examples of these profiles include VAV, fan coil, heat pump, and rooftop units. Refer to the Tracer Summit Connections to LonTalk Devices engineering bulletin (BAS-PRB003-EN) for more details on support of LonTalk devices. Trane controllers that do not conform to the supported profiles Certain Trane controllers do not comply to a standard profile. An example of this is the Tracer Loop Controller. In this case, we have created an object in the Tracer Summit system to support this device and set it up the same way as an object that follows a standard profile. Similar to the Tracer Loop Controller, the Tracer MP580/581 has its own object type in Tracer Summit. It can have one of three profile configurations: No Profile, DAC, or SCC. In all three cases, it must be created in the Tracer Summit database as a Tracer MP580/581 object in order to access BAS-PRB005-EN

all point data available to Tracer Summit. Non-Trane controllers that do not conform to the supported profiles LonTalk controllers that do not conform to SCC, DAC, or Chiller profiles can be supported as a Generic LonTalk Device (GLD). Most LonTalk controllers that use FTT-10A or FT-X1 transceivers and support standard network variable types (SNVTs) can be set up as a GLD. The GLD object in the Tracer Summit system acts as a placeholder to identify the LonTalk device and store its location and type. Each piece of data that you want to view, change, or control from this device is then set up using input and output objects (analog inputs, analog outputs, binary inputs, and binary outputs). These input and output objects are the same I/O objects that are used for other applications. Setting up a GLD is typically used to integrate non-Trane controllers that do not follow Tracer Summitsupported profiles. Refer to the Tracer Summit Connections to LonTalk Devices engineering bulletin (BAS-PRB003-EN) for more details. Step 2: Consider the building layout In addition to the UCM quantity limitations, you should consider other factors of building layout when placing UCMs on BCUs. These factors typically fall into two categories: HVAC systems and BACnet communications. BAS-PRB005-EN HVAC systems For best system performance, HVAC subsystems should be contained within a single BCU whenever possible. This limits the dependence on Ethernet LAN communications and allows the BCU and its associated HVAC subsystems to operate as a standalone system. This operation is especially useful during system startup and commissioning or during servicing. For example, if a building has a central chilled water plant, the UCMs associated with the chiller plant should be connected on a single BCU. Another common example is a VAV system; the airhandling unit (AHU) and its associated VAV boxes should be connected to the same BCU. Also, consider using the Rover service tool for VAV and TUC applications. Rover can access any VAV II/III/IV or TUC device connected on the same Comm4 link. It is recommended, for example, to connect all the VAV boxes for a single AHU on the same Comm4 link to facilitate airbalancing operations utilizing Rover. Tracer Summit software or the Rover service tool can be used for commissioning a LonTalk link. BACnet communications BCUs on a local area network (LAN) communicate to PC workstations through Ethernet communications (dedicated or shared network). Ethernet communications Ethernet cabling should be installed by certified personnel. The BAS technician should simply be able to use patch cables to plug BAS devices into the Ethernet LAN. The Ethernet LAN can be either of the following: Dedicated Shared Dedicated network Ethernet communication can be used for a dedicated network. Dedicated networks will remain fairly common. This is due to the fact that building LAN wiring is one of the last phases of a construction site and commissioning of an HVAC system needs to take place prior to this phase of construction. A dedicated Ethernet network can then be connected to a shared Ethernet network and become one component of that network. BACnet/IP communications (shared network) BACnet/IP is supported in the BMTX BCU. This means that BCUs can be connected to a shared Ethernet building LAN. Performing the BACnet/IP functions requires more processor time. Another item to consider is whether the site you plan on connecting by BACnet/IP has any BMTS BCUs on site. If it does, you will need a router between the existing dedicated network of BMTS BCUs and the shared network. Important: The spreadsheet does not adequately account for the load placed on a BCU by LAN network traffic when using BACnet/IP. High LAN traffic and/or broadcast storms may cause BCU performance to diminish, potentially to 13

an unacceptable degree. In these cases, the use of a router is recommended to isolate the BCU from the LAN. Step 3: Determine special input/output object needs All Trane UCMs have internal diagnostics that you can set up to be announced on Tracer Summit PC workstations. In addition, the Tracer Summit object-oriented database allows other objects to access or reference properties (values) from all objects, such as UCMs and applications. Therefore, analog and binary inputs typically need to be created only when custom alarming sequences or a BACnet interface to another system is required. You can create analog and binary input objects to monitor various properties within the Tracer Summit system. Set up these inputs to react to alarm cond

managed by a Tracer Summit BAS. The system consists of BCUs, UCMs, PC workstations, and Tracer Summit software. The Tracer Summit system uses high-speed, distributed processing on a local area network (LAN) to operate the components as one system. The Tracer Summit hardware architecture allows UCMs to be connected to BCUs. Multiple BCUs

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