POLS 477/571 Muslims/Islam, Modernity And Democracy

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University of AlbertaDepartment of Political ScienceFall 2015POLS 477/571Muslims/Islam, Modernity and DemocracyInstructor: Dr. Mojtaba MahdaviOffice: Tory Building, 10-25Phone: (780) 492-0736Email: mojtaba.mahdavi@ualberta.caMondays: 13:00-15:50Lecture room: T 10-4Office hours: Mondays 10:30 AM – 12:00 Noonor by appointments!! Seminar DescriptionThis advanced seminar is designed to examine the complex relationship betweenMuslims/Islam, modernity and democracy both in theory and the real world of Muslimcountries.The course is divided into four sections. The first section will problematize orthodox andmodern theories of ‘Islam and politics’. We will historicize Muslims encounter with modernity byexamining the way in which the traditional heritage has impinged on the development of modernideas in the Muslim world. The second section will examine theoretical approaches to ‘Islam andthe challenge of modernity/modernities’. We will study issues such as Muslims and HumanRights, Muslims and gender politics, Islamization of modernity, modernization of Islam, andMuslims multiple responses to multiple modernities. We will specifically look at three distinctMuslim responses/approaches to modernity/modernities: traditional Islam, various forms ofIslamism, and progressive reformist Islam. The third section will examine the complex nature ofIslamist violent actions and resistant movement vis-à-vis the national states and the West. Thefourth section will explore theoretical debates over the issue of Islam, secularism, public religion,and democracy. We will examine theories and practices of religion and democracy in general andIslam, secularism and democracy in particular. More specifically, we will problematizeconcepts/themes such as “Muslim Exceptionalism”, “Islamic State”, and “Islamic Democracy”.The major goal of this course is to introduce a critical perspective on the relationship betweenIslam, modernity and democracy. After completing this course, students will have developed theiranalytical skills and theoretical tools in critical understanding of Islam, Islamist movements andculture and politics of the Muslim World.!! Seminar Requirements(a) Four reading-reflections and Seminar Participation(b) Seminar Presentation(c) Book review(d) Term paper20%20%20%40%Monday, Oct. 19Monday, Nov. 301

(a) Students will read and reflect on the required readings at each seminar session; an informedand active participation in the seminar discussion is required. Moreover, each student will beexpected to submit four reading-reflections. Each reading reflection is a three-page summary andcritical reflection of the required readings and must be submitted in the same sessions weexamine the readings. You may choose any 4 out of the11 sessions.(b) Each session the class takes up a specific theme, based on the required readings, and twostudents will lead the seminar.(c) A book review of 5 typed, double-spaced page from One of the following books, due MondayOctober19:* Jessica Stern and J. Berger, ISIS: The State of Terror (Ecco/Harper Collins Publishers, 2015)* Abdullahi An-Na’im, Islam and the Secular State (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2008)* A. Bayat, ed. Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam (Oxford Univ. Press, 2013)* Farzin Vahdat, Islamic Ethos and the Specter of Modernity (Anthem Press, 2015)(d) One term paper of 12-15 typed, double-spaced pages, due Monday November 30, on a topic ofstudents’ choice that is relevant to the themes of the seminar. You need to discuss the paper’stopic with the instructor.!! Seminar Materialsa) Required:1.! Asef Bayat, ed. Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam (New York:Oxford University Press, 2013).2.! Mojtaba Mahdavi, ed., Muslims and Modernities: Critical Reflection (New York: LinusPublications, Inc., 2010).3.! Roxanne L. Euben and Muhammad Qasim Zaman, eds. Princeton Readings in IslamicThought: Texts and Contexts from al-Banna to Bin Laden ((Princeton Univ. press, 2009)4.! Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im, Islam and the Secular State (Cambridge: HarvardUniversity Press, 2008).5.! Gerhard Bowering, ed. Islamic Political Thought – An Introduction (Princeton UniversityPress, 2015)6.! Univ. of Alberta E Class: https://eclass.srv.ualberta.cab) Recommended:1.! John Esposito and Emad El-Din Shahin, Eds. The Oxford handbook of Islam and Politics(Oxford University Press, 2013).2.! Shireen T. Hunter, ed., Reformist Voices of Islam: Mediating Islam and Modernity(Armonk: M.E. Sharp, 2009)3.! Aziz Al-Azmeh, Islams and Modernities, 3rd ed. (London: Verso, 2009)4.! John L. Esposito, ed., Voices of Resurgent Islam (New York; Oxford: Oxford UniversityPress, 1983)5.! John L. Esposito and John O. Voll, Makers of Contemporary Islam (Oxford: OxfordUniversity Press, 2001)6.! Noah Feldman, The Rise and Fall of the Islamic State (Princeton University Press, 2008)2

7.! Mehran Kamrava, ed., The New Voices of Islam: Rethinking Politics and Modernity ---AReader (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006)8.! Ibrahim M. Abu-Rabi, ed. The Contemporary Arab Reader on Political Islam (PlutoPress and U of Alberta Press, 2010)9.! Hamid Enayat, Modern Islamic Political Thought, new ed. (London; New York: I.B.Tauris, 2005)10.! Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im, Muslims and Global Justice (Philadelphia: University ofPennsylvania Press, 2011).11.! Shahrough Akhavi, The Middle East: The Politics of Sacred and Secular (London: ZedBooks, 2009).12.! E. Mendieta and J. Vanantwerpen, eds. The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere(New York: Columbia University Press, 2011).13.! Leonard Lewisohn, Hafiz and the Religion of Love in Classical Poetry (I. B. Tauris,2010)14.! John Freely, Light From the East: How the Science of Medieval Islam Helped to Shapethe Western World (I. B. Tauris, 2011).15.! Sadik J. Al-Azm, Critique of Religious Thought (Berlin: Gerlach Press, 2015)16.! Hamid Dabashi, Can Non-Europeans Think? (London: Verso, 2015).!! Seminar Topics and Schedule:Part I: Islam and Politics: Relevance of the Past?1. Introduction: Historicizing/Contextualizing Islam and Islamology(Mon. Sept. 14)Required Readings:Gerhard Bowering, ed. Islamic Political Thought – An Introduction (Princeton University Press,2015), pp. 1-23; 152-168; 185-201.Zachary Lockman, Contending Visions of the Middle East: The History and Politics ofOrientalism (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004) in Mahdavi ed.,Muslims and Modernities, pp. 46-98.Recommended Readings/Sources:* Islam: Empire of Faith (PBS Documentary): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v UHhbSvOcz4gShahrough Akhavi, The Middle East: The Politics of Sacred and Secular (Zed Books, 2009), pp. 1-50.Reza Aslan, No god but God: The origins, Evaluation, and Future of Islam (random House Trade, 2005)Edward Said, Orientalism (New York: Pantheon Books, 1978)Hamid Dabashi, Post-Orientalism: Knowledge and Power in Time of Terror (Transaction Publishers, 2008)A.L. Macfie, Orientalism (Toronto: Pearson, 2002), in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 1-45.3

2. Islam and Politics: Traditional Views and Modern Theories(Mon. Sept. 21)Required ReadingsGerhard Bowering, ed. Islamic Political Thought – An Introduction (Princeton University Press,2015), pp. 25-47; 219-262.Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Islam: Religion, History, and Civilization (Harper San Francisco, 2003) inMahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 99-156.John L. Esposito, Islam and Politics, 4th ed. (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1998) inMahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 157-197.Mojtaba Mahdavi, “Islam/Muslims and Political Leadership,” in J. Masciulli, M. Molchanov, andA. Knight, eds. The Ashgate Research Companion to Political Leadership (Ashgate, 2009), pp.287-306.Recommended Readings:* Karen Armstrong, Islam, A Short History (New York: Modern Library Chronicles, 2002)* Richard W. Bulliet, Religion and State in Islam: From Medieval Caliphate to the MuslimBrotherhood, Occasional Paper Series, no. 2 (University of Denver, 2011).Ali Abd Al-razeq, “The Caliphate as a Political Institution”, in Anouar Abdel-Malek, ed. ContemporaryArab Political Thought (London: Zed Books Ltd., 1983), 41-44Hassan al-Banna, “The Credo of the ‘Muslim Brotherhood’”, in Anouar Abdel-Malek, ed. ContemporaryArab Political Thought (London: Zed Books ltd., 1983) pp. 45-47.Ali Shariati, “Selection and/or Election,” http://www.shariati .com Sh. Akhavi, The Middle East: The Politics of Sacred and Secular (Zed Books, 2009), pp. 51-73; 149-194.Part II: Muslims and the Challenge of Modernity: Theoretical Debates3. “Mapping Modernities”: Islamic and/or Western?(Mon. Sept. 28)Required Readings:Gerhard Bowering, ed. Islamic Political Thought – An Introduction (Princeton University Press,2015), pp. 135-151.S N Eisenstadt, “Multiple modernities,” Daedalus; winter 2000; 129, in Mahdavi ed., Muslimsand Modernities, pp. 198-223.Roxanne L. Euben, “Mapping Modernities, ‘Islamic’ and ‘Western’”, in Fred Dallmayr, ed.,Border Crossings: Toward a Comparative Political Theory (New York: Lexington Books, 1999),in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 227-246.4

Fazlur Rahman, “Islam and Modernity” in Liberal Islam: a source book, Charles Kurzman, ed.(New York; Oxford Univ. Press, 1998), in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 254-268.Nasr Hamid Abu Zeid, “The modernization of Islam or the Islamization of modernity”, RoelMeijer, ed. Cosmopolitanism, Identity and Authenticity in the Middle East (Surrey: Curzon,1999) in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 269-283.Seyyed Hossein Nasr, The Essential Seyyed Hossein Nasr, William C. Chittick ed. (WorldWisdom, 2007) in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 286-310.Recommended Readings:* Farzin Vahdat, Islamic Ethos and the Specter of Modernity (Anthem Press, 2015)* Hamid Dabashi, Can Non-Europeans Think? (London: Verso, 2015)* Said Amir Arjomand and Elisa Reis, Eds. World of Difference (Sage Publications, 2013)* Masoud Kamali, “Multiple Modernities and Islamism in Iran,” Social Compass, 54(3), 2007, 373–387. http://cafelitt.ca/down/Modernities.Iran.pdfAmyn B. Sajoo, ed. Muslim Modernities: Expressions of the civil imagination (London: I.B. TaurisPublishers, 2008)Masoud Kamali, Multiple Modernities, civil society and Islam: The case of Iran and Turkey (LiverpoolUniversity Press, 2006)Fred Dallmayr, Dialogue among Civilizations: Some Exemplary Voices (New York: Palgrave, 2002) pp.85-104.Masoud Kamali, “Islam, Civil Society and Modernization,” in Masoud Kamali, Multiple Modernities, CivilSociety and Islam: The Case of Iran and Turkey (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2006), pp. 27-48Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Traditional Islam in the Modern World (London; New York: Routledge & KeganPaul, 1987) pp. 11-25.John L. Esposito and John O. Voll, Makers of Contemporary Islam (Oxford: Oxford University Press,2001), pp. 3-22.Hamid Enayat, Modern Islamic Political Thought, New ed. (London; New York: I.B. Tauris, 2005), pp.111-159.Ali Shariati, Civilization and Modernization: Reflections of Humanity http://www.shariati.com/ 4. Islamism: Concept and Pioneers?(Mon. Oct. 05)Required Readings:Gerhard Bowering, ed. Islamic Political Thought – An Introduction (Princeton University Press,2015), pp. 48-67.Roxanne L. Euben and Muhammad Qasim Zaman, eds., Princeton Readings in Islamic Thought:Texts and Contexts from al-Banna to Bin Laden ((Princeton Univ. press, 2009), pp. 1-46.5

Bobby S. Sayyid, “Framin’ fundamentalism,” in Bobby S. Sayyid, A Fundamental Fear:Eurocentrism and the emergence of Islamism (London: Zed Books Ltd, 1997) in Mahdavi ed.,Muslims and Modernities, pp. 311-340.Samir Amin, “Political Islam in the Service of Imperialism,” Monthly Review, December 2007, inMahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 371-386.Hasan al-Banna, “Toward the Light,” in Roxanne L. Euben and Muhammad Qasim Zaman, eds.,Princeton Readings in Islamic Thought: Texts and Contexts from al-Banna to Bin Laden(Princeton Univ. press, 2009), pp. 49-78.Sayyid Abu’l-A’la Mawdudi, “The Islamic Law,” in Roxanne L. Euben and Muhammad QasimZaman, eds., Princeton Readings in Islamic Thought: Texts and Contexts from al-Banna to BinLaden ((Princeton Univ. press, 2009), pp. 79-106.Sayyid Qutb, “Signposts along the Road;” and “In the shade of the Quran,” in Roxanne L. Eubenand Muhammad Qasim Zaman, eds., Princeton Readings in Islamic Thought: Texts and Contextsfrom al-Banna to Bin Laden ((Princeton Univ. press, 2009), pp. 129-152.Mojtaba Mahdavi, “Ayatollah Khomeini,” in John Esposito and Emad El-Din Shahin, Eds. TheOxford handbook of Islam and Politics (Oxford University Press, 2013), pp. 180-201.Recommended Readings:* John Esposito and Emad El-Din Shahin, Eds. The Oxford handbook of Islam and Politics (OxfordUniversity Press, 2013).* Farzin Vahdat, Islamic Ethos and the Specter of Modernity (Anthem Press, 2015)*Karima Bennoune, “Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here,” TEDxExeter; Available at:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v XLi6iYnnsGcRoxanne Euben, Enemy in the Mirror: Islamic Fundamentalism and the Limits of Modern Rationalism --A Work of Comparative Political Theory (Princeton Univ. Press, 1999) in Mahdavi ed., Muslims andModernities, pp. 342-370.Susan Buck-Morss, “Critical Theory and Islamism,” in Thinking Past terror: Islamism and Critical Theoryon the Left (London: Verso, 2003), 41-56.“Yahya Sadowski, “Political Islam: Asking the Wrong Question,” Annual Reviews, 2006.Fazlur Rahman, Islam, 2nd ed., (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979) pp. 193-211.John l. Esposito, “Contemporary Islam: Reformation or Revolution?” in the Islamic Threat: Myth orReality? 3rd ed., John L. Esposito (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 5-22.Frederic Volpi, ed. Political Islam: A Critical Reader (new York; Routledge 2011)Yvonne y. Haddad, “Sayyid Qutb: Ideologue of Islamic Revival,” in Voices of Resurgent Islam, John L.Esposito, ed., (New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983), pp.67- 98.6

Tamara Cofman Wittes, “Three kinds of movements,” Journal of Democracy Volume 19, Number 3 July2008, pp. 7-12Fathi Osman, “Mawdudi’s Contribution to the Development of Modern Islamic Thinking in the ArabicSpeaking World,” The Muslim World, Vol. (93) July-October 2003, pp. 465-485Vali Nasr, “International Relations of an Islamist Movement; The Case of the Jama’at-I Islami ofPakistan,” Councils of Foreign Relations, 2000.Aijaz Ahmad, “Islam, Islamism and the West,” Socialist Register 2008Ervand Abrahamian, Khomeinism: Essays on the Islamic Republic (Berkeley: University of Californiapress, 1993), pp. 13-39.Monday Oct. 12: No Class5. Post-Islamism?(Mon. Oct. 19)Required Readings:Asef Bayat, ed. Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam (New York: OxfordUniversity Press, 2013), pp. 1-254.Recommended Readings:* Mojtaba Mahdavi, “Post-Islamist Trends in Postrevolutionary Iran,” Comparative Studies of SouthAsia, Africa and the Middle East, Volume 31, Number 1 (2011), 94-109.* Mojtaba Mahdavi, “Muslims and Modernities: From Islamism to Post-Islamism?” ReligiousStudies and Theology, Vol. 32, No. 1 (2013), 57-71.Asef Bayat, ed. Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam (New York: Oxford UniversityPress, 2013), pp. 257-341.6. Who are the Liberal and/or Progressive Muslims?(Mon. Oct. 26)Required Readings:Abdolkarim Soroush, “The changeable and the unchangeable,” in Lena Larsen & Christian Moe,eds., New Directions in Islamic Thought: exploring reform and Muslim tradition (London: I. B.Tauris, 2009), in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 435-441.Abdulaziz Sachedina, “Ali Shariati: Ideologue of the Iranian Revolution,” in Voices of ResurgentIslam, John L. Esposito, ed., (New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983), in Mahdavied., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 411-432.Mohamed Mahmoud, “Mahmud Muhammad Taha’s Second Message of Islam and his Modernistproject,” in Islam and Modernity; Muslim Intellectuals Respond, John Cooper, Ronald Nettler,and Mohamed Mahmoud, eds. (London: I.B. Tauris, 2000) in Mahdavi ed., Muslims andModernities.7

Mohsen Kadivar, “Human Rights and intellectual Islam,” in Lena Larsen & Christian Moe, eds.,New Directions in Islamic Thought: exploring reform and Muslim tradition (London: I. B. Tauris,2009), in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 442-468.Gerhard Bowering, ed. Islamic Political Thought – An Introduction (Princeton University Press,2015), pp. 202-218.Recommended Readings:* Mojtaba Mahdavi, “ One Bed and Two Dreams? Contentious Public Religion in the Discourses ofAyatollah Khomeini and Ali Shariati,” Studies in Religion/ Sciences Religieuses (2014) 43:1: 25-52.* Mahdavi, Mojtaba. “Post-Islamist Trends in Post-Revolutionary Iran,” Comparative Studies of SouthAsia,Africa, and the Middle East, 31:1 2011, 94-109.* Farzin Vahdat, Islamic Ethos and the Specter of Modernity (Anthem Press, 2015)Shireen T. Hunter, Reformist Voices of Islam: Mediating Islam and Modernity; lecture available at:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v u5JxqHXBrEMAli Rahnema, An Islamic Utopian: A Political Biography of Ali Shariati (London: I.B. Tauris, 2000)Abbas Manoochehri, “Critical Religious Reason: Ali Shariati on Religion, Philosophy and Emancipation,”Polylog, 2005.Abdolkarim Soroush, “Reason, Freedom, and Democracy in Islam,” in the New Voices of Islam: RethinkingPolitics and Modernity ---A Reader, Mehran Kamrava, ed. (Berkeley: University of California Press,2006), pp. 243-261.Tariq Ramadan, “The Way (Al-Sharia) of Islam,” in the New Voices of Islam: Rethinking Politics andModernity ---A Reader, Mehran Kamrava, ed. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006), 65-97.Ali Mirsepassi, Intellectual Discourse and the Politics of Modernization: Negotiating Modernity in Iran(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), 114-118.Mohsen Kadivar, “Freedom of Religion and Belief in Islam,” in the New Voices of Islam: RethinkingPolitics and Modernity ---A Reader, Mehran Kamrava, ed. (Berkeley: University of California Press,2006), pp. 119-142.Mohsen Kadivar, “The Principles of Compatibility of Islam and Modernity”, Presented to the InternationalSymposium of ‘Islam, Society, Modernity’ at Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Religion andLaicity, The Free University of Brussels, Belgium; 7-8 October 2004. http://www.kadivar.com/Index.asp?DocId 831&AC 1&AF 1&ASB 1&AGM 1&AL 1&DT dtv Nasr Hamed Abu Zeid, “Heaven, Which Way?”, Al-Ahram Weekly , 12-18 September 2002, No. 603, www.ahram.org/weekly/2002/603/sc16-17.htm Robin Wright, “Two Visions of Reformation”, in L. Diamond, M. Plattner, and D. Brumberg, Islam andDemocracy in the Middle East (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) pp. 220-231.Gerhard Bowering, ed. Islamic Political Thought – An Introduction (Princeton University Press, 2015), pp.105-122.8

7. Muslims and Islamism on Gender and Human Rights(Mon. Nov. 02)Required Readings:Leila Ahmed, “Women and the Rise of Islam,” in The New Voices of Islam: Rethinking Politicsand Modernity ---A Reader, Mehran Kamrava, ed. (Berkeley: University of California Press,2006) in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 490-512.Fatima Mernissi, “Muslim Women and Fundamentalism,” in The New Voices of Islam:Rethinking Politics and Modernity ---A Reader, Mehran Kamrava, ed. (Berkeley: University ofCalifornia Press, 2006) in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 513-519.Ziba Mir-Hosseini, “Classical fiqh, contemporary ethics and gender justice “in Lena Larsen &Christian Moe, eds., New Directions in Islamic Thought: exploring reform and Muslim tradition(London: I. B. Tauris, 2009) in Mahdavi ed., Muslims and Modernities, pp. 520-531.Murtaza Mutahhari, “The Human Status of Women in the Quran,” in Roxanne L. Euben andMuhammad Qasim Zaman, eds., Princeton Readings in Islamic Thought: Texts and Contextsfrom al-Banna to Bin Laden (Princeton Univ. press, 2009), pp. 249-274.Zaynab al-Ghazali, “An Islamist Activist;” and “From Days of My Life,” in Roxanne L. Eubenand Muhammad Qasim Zaman, eds., Princeton Readings in Islamic Though

Muslims/Islam, modernity and democracy both in theory and the real world of Muslim countries. The course is divided into four sections. The first section will problematize orthodox and modern theories of ‘Islam and politics’. We will historicize Muslims encounter with modernity by ex

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