AN EQUITY TOOLKIT FOR INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS: CENTERING YOUTH .

3y ago
22 Views
2 Downloads
1.51 MB
13 Pages
Last View : 1m ago
Last Download : 5m ago
Upload by : Troy Oden
Transcription

AN EQUITY TOOLKIT FOR INCLUSIVESCHOOLS: CENTERING YOUTH VOICE INSCHOOL CHANGECreated by:Midwest and Plains Equity Assistance CenterSeptember, 2017

AcknowledgementsThe following individuals contributed to thedesign and development of this tool:Taucia GonzalezKatie M. McCabeCarolina Lobo De CastroWith review and further contributions from:Kathleen A.K. ThoriusCesur DagliNick PearceSeena M. SkeltonTiffany Kyser

About the CentersGreat Lakes Equity Center (Center) is an educational research and service centerlocated in Indiana University’s School of Education at IUPUI. The Center engages inequity-focused technical assistance and related research with educational andcommunity agencies focused on systemic improvements to serve all learners withparticular focus on educational access, participation and outcomes for those who havebeen historically marginalized. Midwest and Plains Equity Assistance Center is a projectof the Center and provides technical assistance related to educational equity based onstudent race, national origin, sex, and religion at no cost to public educational agenciesthroughout its 13-state region in the Midwest and Plains.IntroductionThis equity toolkit is designed as an opportunity for school stakeholders to gauge,reflect on, and plan for meaningful youth participation in advancing more equitable andinclusive schools. Although this toolkit is designed for collaborative use with schooladults and youth, it can be modified for use at the classroom-level, solely with youth, orsolely with adults. In essence, this tool is designed to meet school stakeholders wherethey are and provide them with opportunities for reflection and planning in order toadvance equity at the school, grade-level, or classroom level. This toolkit centers thenotion of “student voice” as a robust equity tool in the work to create more inclusiveschools. Student voice can mean many things, but for the purpose of this took, we useMitra and Gross’s (2009) student voice framework, which they refer to as the “Pyramidof Student Voice,” to operationalize student voice as an equity tool in schools (seeFigure 1).Figure 1 (Mitra & Gross, 2009, p. 523)Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-1-

Framework for Centering Student Voice in Inclusive SchoolsThis equity toolkit draws on Mitra and Gross’s framework to think not only about studentvoice development but also how schools structure equitable opportunities for historicallymarginalized youth (e.g., youth with disabilities, students of color, students withdisciplinary records, non-Christian) to develop voice while exploring and acting oneducational inequities that impact their own educational experiences.Mitra and Gross’s (2009) framework represents student voice as it develops within aschool setting. As the pyramid ascends, student civic engagement concurrentlydevelops alongside skill sets to actively participate in democracies beyond school. Thefoundational tier, “being heard” refers to school adults acknowledging that youth haveunique and important perspectives (Mitra & Gross, 2009) that have the capacity to pushadult conversations and understandings beyond comfortable and palatable zones.Indeed, moving past these adult comfort zones can push school change into innovativeterritories. The next tier of the student voice, “collaborating with adults,” involvesstudents and staff working together to improve their school through action. The final,and smallest tier, “building capacity for leadership,” youth not only partner with adultsbut are provided with opportunities for civic development. In other words, studentsdevelop the capacities needed to take action as leaders in their schools, communities,and democratic societies. Systematically sharing leadership with youth also opens upopportunities to re-engage disenfranchised youth (Mitra & Gross, 2009).Though Mitra and Gross (2009) highlight the increased civic development thattranspires as one ascends the student voice framework, we would like to highlight thatthis framework also affords schools a robust way to increase equity and inclusion bycentering the experiences of historically marginalized youth (see Figure 2).Figure 2 adapted from Mitra and Gross (2009, p. 523)Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-2-

How to Use This ToolWe developed this toolkit to be used flexibly by school stakeholders committed tocreating equitable and inclusive schools with youth. Therefore, youth may or may not beinvolved in using this toolkit.The need for including student voice in inclusive education reform efforts is a criticalstep toward developing more equitable schools. Though youth are at the center of allschool reform efforts, they are seldom treated as partners in these efforts. Withoutyouth, school reform efforts are limited to adults’ understandings of what counts asequity, which can continue to perpetuate some of the most marginalized youth. This tooldraws on student voice as a robust tool in school reform, with the understanding thatyouth contributions and partnerships can deeply impact the equity and inclusive visionsof educational systems.This tool can be used as an opportunity collaboratively to problem solve, identifypriorities, and formulate action plans. The tool maintains focus of three principlesregarding student voice: youth offer valuable perspectives and capacities that canadvance this work in innovative ways, adult-centered notions may not address theequity issues impacting youths’ educational experiences, and that opportunities todevelop civic engagement have historically been scarce for historically marginalizedyouth.The following underlying principles ground the tool: Youth have unique and valuable perspectives and capacities Adult-centered notions of equity may have major equity gaps Opportunities for youth to develop leadership capacity is an equity issueIn the first part of the toolkit (pp. 4-6) educators will see transforming descriptors ofyouth representation in their school. Adults (possibly working in partnership with youth)are able to identify where they see these indicators in their school, who is representedin each descriptor, and which indicators might become equity priorities within theschool. There are blank spaces were teams are able to add it their own descriptors ofyouth voice observed in their school. The second step of the toolkit (pp. 7-8) is anoptional tool for youth to participate in mapping student voice issues in their school. Thisis a flexible tool that youth can you individually, in pairs, or in small groups to inform thelarger conversation. The final step of the toolkit (pp. 9) allows adults and youth to beginthe action plan of prioritizing equity issues within their school and identifying who isrepresented in various equity issues. The team is able to use this step in the tool forgoal setting.Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-3-

Centering Student Voice in Inclusive SchoolsBeing HeardTransforming DescriptorsWhere do adults/youth see evidenceof this descriptor(school wide, incertain classrooms,in certain subjects)?Students have opportunitiesto discuss how theyexperience school in classor through school-wideinitiatives.Students have regularopportunities to engage infacilitated discussions wherethey can express variousviewpoints even if they arecounter to dominantperspectives.Students have a system forproviding feedback to schoolleaders regarding schoolissues, suggestions, anddesires.Students have multiplemeans of expressing theirperspectives regardingschool issues (e.g., throughessays, art, dialogue,technology).[Add your own descriptor]:Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-4-Who isrepresented andnot representedin this practice?Which of thesedescriptors areequity priorities(rate as low,moderate, or highpriority area)?

Centering Student Voice in Inclusive SchoolsCollaborating with AdultsTransforming DescriptorsWhere do adults/youth see evidenceof this descriptor(school wide, incertain classrooms,in certain subjects)?Students have opportunitiesto identify equity issuesimpacting their educationalexperiences without adultcensorship.Students have opportunitiesto work with adults to learnmore about the issues theyidentify.Adults consider all of thestudent-identified issues andwork with youth to prioritizewhich should be included inschool reform efforts.Student-collected data isused as a data set in schoolimprovement efforts.[Add your own descriptor]:[Add your own descriptor]:Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-5-Who isrepresented andnot representedin this practice?Which of thesedescriptors areequity priorities(rate as low,moderate, or highpriority area)?

Centering Student Voice in Inclusive SchoolsBuilding Capacity for LeadershipTransforming DescriptorsWhere do adults/youth see evidenceof this descriptor(school wide, incertain classrooms,in certain subjects)?Students are activelyinvolved in schoolimprovement meetings.Adult facilitators supportyouth in developing thecapacities to address theissues they identify (e.g.,research methods,dissemination strategies).Historically marginalizedyouth have opportunities tore-engage in their educationthrough leadership and civicengagement rather thanover-relying on academicinterventions.[Add your own descriptor]:[Add your own descriptor]:Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-6-Who isrepresented andnot representedin this practice?Which of thesedescriptors areequity priorities(rate as low,moderate, or highpriority area)?

Mapping Youth Voice at SchoolRecommended tools: Paper copies of the school map, color-codingdot labels in assorted colors, pens/pencilsYouth can create individual maps, work in pairs (social peer groups),or in small groups to map their school. The following coding systemcan be used to map student voice in your school, but you can also addyour own categories:Where do I feel that school adults care about my ideas andopinions?Where do I feel like I can express my opinion even if it is differentfrom adults’ opinion?Which students are most respected or listened to in different parts ofthe school? You can label the dots with different student groups byrace, ethnicity, sexual orientation or gender identity, abilitydifferences, sex, or income.Ex: LGBTQ might be placed on a sticker in Ms. Smith’s classbecause of a LGBTQ after school club.Add your own category. For example, are there places in schoolwhere some students are really listened to and others are not?Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-7-

Whose Voice Counts and Where?Look at your map and use it to discuss student voice in your school. Were there similarities in your orange and pink dots? What happens in these placesthat make you feel that your voice matters?What Do School Adults Need to Know?Brainstorm a hypothesis about student voice in your school.What do you think school adults need to know about student voice inyour school? Do students (most, some, few) have opportunities to learn the skills to be a leaderin their schools or community?Do adults (most, few some) seek out student ideas?Do adults (most, few some) value student ideas and act on them in class or in theschool?Where do some of these student voice opportunities already exist in the school?Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-8-

Moving Forward TogetherWhat did we learn about student voice in our school?In what ways are youth andadult perspectives oncurrent student voiceopportunities in the schoolsimilar and different?What existing practices,policies, programs might beopportunities to build on orlearn from?What equity concerns arosepertaining to who hasopportunities to developleadership (civic capacity)?Who needs to be involved in implementing the plan?Whose voice is heard in theschool and who hasopportunities for developingleadership capacities? Howcan any inequities beremedied?Where is your school on theFramework for CenteringStudent Voice in InclusiveSchools (see Figure 1)?How can these concerns be addressed in moving-forward goals?Identify one to two goalsthat would result in moreequitable youth involvementin school change?Where is your school on theFramework for CenteringStudent Voice in InclusiveSchools (see Figure 1)?Who should be involved(adults and youth) and whoshould be responsible(adults)?What resources areavailable to supportachieving these goals?Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center-9-

ReferencesMitra, D. L., & Gross, S. J. (2009). Increasing student voice in high school reform: Buildingpartnerships, improving outcomes. Educational Management Administration &Leadership, 37(4), 522-543.Copyright 2017 by Great Lakes Equity Center- 10

IMPACT:Educate, Engage, Empower — For EquityGreat Lakes Equity Center902 West New York St.Indianapolis, IN 46202317-278-3493 - glec@iupui.eduglec.education.iupui.eduIUPUI School of Education 902West New York St.Indianapolis, IN 46202317-274-6801 - llines@iupui.edueducation.iupui.eduRecommended citation: Gonzalez, T., McCabe, K.M., & Castro, C.L.D. (2017). Equity Tool: AnEquity Toolkit For Inclusive Schools: Centering Youth Voice in School Change. Indianapolis, IN:Great Lakes Equity Center.Disclaimer: Midwest and Plains Equity Assistance Center is committed to the sharing of informationregarding issues of equity in education. Reference in this tool to any specific publication, person, oridea is for the information and convenience of the public and does not necessarily reflect the viewsand opinions of Midwest and Plains Equity Assistance Center. The contents of this tool weredeveloped under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education (S004D110021). However, thesecontents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and endorsementby the Federal Government should not be assumed.

The second step of the toolkit (pp. 7-8) is an optional tool for youth to participate in mapping student voice issues in their school. This is a flexible tool that youth can you individually, in pairs, or in small groups to inform the larger conversation. The final step of the toolkit (pp. 9) allows adults and youth to begin

Related Documents:

Bruksanvisning för bilstereo . Bruksanvisning for bilstereo . Instrukcja obsługi samochodowego odtwarzacza stereo . Operating Instructions for Car Stereo . 610-104 . SV . Bruksanvisning i original

10 tips och tricks för att lyckas med ert sap-projekt 20 SAPSANYTT 2/2015 De flesta projektledare känner säkert till Cobb’s paradox. Martin Cobb verkade som CIO för sekretariatet för Treasury Board of Canada 1995 då han ställde frågan

service i Norge och Finland drivs inom ramen för ett enskilt företag (NRK. 1 och Yleisradio), fin ns det i Sverige tre: Ett för tv (Sveriges Television , SVT ), ett för radio (Sveriges Radio , SR ) och ett för utbildnings program (Sveriges Utbildningsradio, UR, vilket till följd av sin begränsade storlek inte återfinns bland de 25 största

Hotell För hotell anges de tre klasserna A/B, C och D. Det betyder att den "normala" standarden C är acceptabel men att motiven för en högre standard är starka. Ljudklass C motsvarar de tidigare normkraven för hotell, ljudklass A/B motsvarar kraven för moderna hotell med hög standard och ljudklass D kan användas vid

LÄS NOGGRANT FÖLJANDE VILLKOR FÖR APPLE DEVELOPER PROGRAM LICENCE . Apple Developer Program License Agreement Syfte Du vill använda Apple-mjukvara (enligt definitionen nedan) för att utveckla en eller flera Applikationer (enligt definitionen nedan) för Apple-märkta produkter. . Applikationer som utvecklas för iOS-produkter, Apple .

Page 4 of 30 ABOUT THE INCLUSIVE CHILD CARE TOOLKIT PURPOSE The Inclusive Child Care Toolkit is a user-friendly resource intended to support high quality, inclusive practices in child care settings throughout British Columbia. Inclusion in this context is supporting all children to participate fully within child care regardless of their abilities.

Callan Periodic Table of Investment Returns Returns Ranked in Order of Performance (as of June 30, 2019) Equity Cap Large-9.11% Equity Cap Large-11.89% Equity Cap Large-22.10% Equity Cap Large 28.68% Equity Cap Large 10.88% Equity Cap Large 4.91% Equity Cap Large 15.79% Equity Cap Large

AAPL UW Equity APPLE 情報技術 MSFT UW Equity MICROSOFT CORP 情報技術 AMZN UW Equity AMAZON.COM 一般消費財・サービス GOOGL UW Equity ALPHABET A コミュニケーション・サービス TSLA UW Equity TESLA 一般消費財・サービス GOOG UW Equity ALPHABET C コミュニケーション・サービス