ENGLISH LANGU AGE ARTS III READING

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS IIIREADINGEND-OF-COURSE EXAM GRADE 9–12 YEAR 17–18ASSESSMENT BLUEPRINT

Purpose StatementEnglish Language Arts III: ReadingThe English Language Arts III Reading End-of-Course (EOC) Exam is intended to measure student proficiency of the New Mexico Common Core StateStandards. This course-level exam is provided to all students who have completed a third-year high school English Language Arts program or relatedcourses.This exam can be given for the following STARS course codes: 1003 - English/Language Arts III1012 - AP English Language and Composition1063 - English Language Arts ELDIntended as a final exam for the course, this is a summative exam covering a range of content, skills, and applications. Scores are reported to the teacher,school, district, and state levels for the purposes of student grades, curriculum review, student graduation requirements, and NMTeach summativereports.“The EOCs are exams written by New Mexico Teachers for New Mexico Students.”During the 2016-17 school year, teachers were brought together in person or online as part of the blueprint and exam revision process. The NMPEDextends our gratitude to all those who contributed to this improvement process. Although we were unable to implement every suggestion due toconflicting viewpoints at times, this blueprint reflects the best collaborative effort among dedicated peers.The NMPED would like to especially recognize the following persons who led and influenced the revision for this blueprint: Stephanie Owens, Ph. D., Lead Developer, Consultant, Taos Jocelyne Gillespie, Cloudcroft Municipal Schools, Blueprint Lead Melissa Richards, Hobbs Municipal Schools Jennifer Brown, Des Moines Municipal Schools Michelle Herrera, Amy Biehl (charter) High School, Albuquerque Celeste Kelle, Farmington Municipal Schools Tanya Mirabal, Clovis Municipal Schools Fabian Sisneros, Public Academy for Performing Arts, Albuquerque Public Schools CharterNMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintProject Management byPage 2

Explanation of Blueprint & Test Specifications TableNMCCSS StandardThe standards are identified in thisportion of the blueprint are alignedto the Common Core StateStandards (CCSS). The actual CCSSstandard is reproduced in itsentirety.New Mexico Teachersidentified the standards to bemeasured on the EOC exam.Typically, the standard wasidentified to be measuredbecause: 1) a great deal ofcurricular instructional time isspent on this standard and/or;2) the standards is importantto subsequent learning.Test Item Specifications: This portion of the blueprint is a modification of the Partnership for the Assessment ofReadiness for College and Careers (PARCC) Evidence Tables. The difference between this blueprint and PARCC Evidence Tables is that the PARCCassessments require constructed responses in addition to multiple choice items. These specifications are based on a deconstruction of the skills and knowledge needed todemonstrate proficiency on a particular standard. Not all aspects of a deconstructedstandard are given in these sections. The test item specifications include the prerequisite skills and knowledge from 9th and10th grade as well as an outline of skills and knowledge unique to the standards at 11thand 12th grade. Although the standard may be broader, the item specifications may place constraint onportions of the standards in order to provide more transparency as to what specificallywill be measured relative to the standard. Sample question stems for each standard are provided in this portion of the blueprint.These stems are commonly used on the PARCC assessments.Item Types:All multiple choice items on the reading assessment require students tosupport the answer given in Part A by choosing appropriate evidence in PartB.Number of Items:The number of itemsaligned to each standard isprovided.Additionally, the stems and formats of the distractors are directly modeledusing the PARCC practice tests. Finally, the texts are often related to oneanother, and the texts found on the Reading III exam will be the same textsused on the Writing III exam.The item types for this EOC exam are limited to:MC Multiple Choice onlyNMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintProject Management byPage 3

NMCCSS StandardRL. 11-12.1Key Ideas and DetailsCite strong and thorough textualevidence to support analysis ofwhat the text says explicitly aswell as inferences drawn from thetext, including determining wherethe text leaves matters uncertain.NMCCSS StandardRL. 11-12.2Key Ideas and DetailsDetermine two or more themes orcentral ideas of a text and analyzetheir development over the courseof the text, including how theyinteract and build on one anotherto produce a complex account;provide an objective summary ofthe text.NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintTest Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Recognize strong evidence in the text Use evidence to support analysis of actual text and/or inferencesUnique to 11-12 Grade: Determine where text leaves the reader with uncertainties Interpret places where text leaves something ambiguousSample Question Stem:What statement best supports the answer to Part A?Item Types:Number of Items:5 (This standard is measured on every item set as Part MCB.)Test Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Recognize themes/central ideas Analyze how themes/central ideas are developed through use of details Identify an objective summaryUnique to 11-12 Grade: Explain how themes/central ideas interact and build on each otherSample Question Stem:How is (insert character’s name) conversation important to the development of a centraltheme in this passage?Item Types: MCNumber of Items:1Project Management byPage 4

NMCCSS StandardRL. 11-12.3Key Ideas and DetailsAnalyze the impact of the author’schoices regarding how to develop andrelate elements of a story or drama(e.g., where a story is set, how theaction is ordered, how the charactersare introduced and developed).Test Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Analyze the author’s decisions on the use of story elements impacted the storySpecifications:This standard expands RL. 9-10.3, which emphasizes characters and their role to advance plotor theme, to all story elements (e.g., setting, dialogue, etc.).Sample Question Stem:How does the author use dialogue in the passage to develop a central theme of the novel?Item Types: MCNMCCSS StandardRL 11-12.4Craft and StructureDetermine the meaning of wordsand phrases as they are used inthe text, including figurative andconnotative meanings; analyzethe impact of specific wordchoices on meaning and tone,including words with multiplemeanings or language that isparticularly fresh, engaging, orbeautiful (Include Shakespeare aswell as other authors).NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintNumber of Items:1Test Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Possess a grade-level appropriate vocabulary Determine figurative or connotative meanings of words and phrases Analyze impact of word choices on meaning and toneUnique to 11-12 Grade: Analyze word choices when words can have multiple meaningsSample Question Stem:What is the meaning of the word (insert vocabulary) in paragraph 2?Item Types: MCNumber of Items:2Project Management byPage 5

NMCCSS StandardRL. 11-12.5Craft and StructureAnalyze how an author’s choicesconcerning how to structurespecific parts of a text (e.g., thechoice of where to begin or end astory, the choice to provide acomedic or tragic resolution)contribute to its overall structureand meaning as well as itsaesthetic impact.Test Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Identify how author has structured text Recognize narrative elements and basic text structuring techniquesUnique to 11-12 Grade: Relate a specific text structure – the organizational method of the writing - to themeaning of the text (e.g., narrative, chronological, compare/contrast, inductive,deductive structures.) Narrative structures are setting, characters, plot, and themeSample Question Stem:How does the author most develop (insert character’s name) character over the course of thepassage?Item Types: MCNMCCSS StandardRL. 11-12.6Craft and StructureAnalyze a case in which graspinga point of view requiresdistinguishing what is directlystated in a text from what isreally meant (e.g., satire,sarcasm, irony, orunderstatement).NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintNumber of Items:1Test Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Recognize satire, sarcasm, irony, etc. in text Summarize author’s point of view based on use of these techniques Compare and contrast what is directly stated in a text to what is impliedSpecification: This standard is unique to grades 11-12Sample Question Stem:Which statement that best describes the narrator’s motive in this passage?Item Types:Number of Items:1 MCProject Management byPage 6

NMCCSS StandardRI. 11-12.1Key Ideas and DetailsCite strong and thorough textualevidence to support analysis ofwhat the text says explicitly aswell as inferences drawn fromthe text, including determiningwhere the text leaves mattersuncertain.NMCCSS StandardRI. 11-12.2Key Ideas and DetailsDetermine two or more centralideas of a text and analyze theirdevelopment over the course ofthe text, including how theyinteract and build on oneanother to provide a complexanalysis; provide an objectivesummary of the text.NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintTest Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Recognize the use of strong evidence in a text Use evidence to support analysis of actual text and/or inferencesUnique to 11-12 Grade: Can determine where text leaves the reader with uncertaintiesSample Question Stem:What statement supports the answer to Part A?Item Types:Number of Items:6 (This standard is measured on every item set as Part B) MCTest Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Recognize themes/central ideas Analyze how themes/central ideas are developed through use of detailsUnique to 11-12 Grade: Recognize how central ideas interact and build on each other in an analysisSample Question Stem:Which sentence best states the central argument of (the author’s) opinion?Item Types: MCNumber of Items:1Project Management byPage 7

NMCCSS StandardRI. 11-12.3Key Ideas and DetailsAnalyze a complex set of ideas orsequence of events and explainhow specific individuals, ideas, orevents interact and develop overthe course of the text.Test Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Analyze how ideas develop through a textUnique to 11-12 Grade: (not assessed) Analyze order of ideas, how they are introduced, and connect to each otherSample Question Stem:According to the passage, why are (the authors’) using (a method) to study (the topic)?Item Types:MCNMCCSS StandardRI. 11-12.4Craft and StructureDetermine the meaning of wordsand phrases as they are used in atext, including figurative,connotative, and technicalmeanings; analyze how an authoruses and refines the meaning of akey term or terms over the courseof a text.NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintNumber of Items:1Test Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Comprehend figurative, connotative, and technical meanings of wordsUnique to 11-12 Grade: Use connotation to uncover hidden meanings of wordsSample Question Stem:What does the word (insert vocabulary) most likely mean as used in this sentence from thetext?Item Types: MCNumber of Items:1Project Management byPage 8

NMCCSS StandardRI. 11-12.6Craft and StructureDetermine an author’s point ofview or purpose in a text in whichthe rhetoric is particularlyeffective, analyzing how style andcontent contribute to the power,persuasiveness or beauty of thetext.NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintTest Item Specifications:Modification of the PARCC Evidence Tables: Identify the author’s point of viewUnique to 11-12 Grade: (not assessed) Effectiveness of the author’s use of rhetorical devicesSample Question Stem:What sentence best states the idea developed over the course of the story?Item Types: MCNumber of Items:2Project Management byPage 9

New Mexico Public Education DepartmentELA III Reading SY1718 - EOC Standards & Item Count TableItem Number123456789101111 Paired SetsNMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintItem PartStandards AlignmentPart ARI.11-12.2Part BRI.11-12.1Part ARI.11-12.6Part BRI.11-12.1Part ARI.11-12.3Part BRI.11-12.1Part ARI.11-12.4Part BRI.11-12.1Part ARI.11-12.6Part BRI.11-12.1Part ARL.11-12.2Part BRL.11-12.1Part ARL.11-12.4Part BRL.11-12.1Part ARL.11-12.6Part BRL.11-12.1Part ARL.11-12.5Part BRL.11-12.1Part ARL.11-12.3Part BRL.11-12.1Part ARL.11-12.4Part BRL.11-12.122 Total QuestionsProject Management byPage 10

Reading III Sample ItemsDefinitions have been provided for words italicized and bolded within the text.Read the speech by Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1868 at the Women's Suffrage Convention in Washington, D.C. then answer questions 1 – 2.1 I urge a sixteenth amendment, because 'manhood suffrage,' or a man's government, is civil, religious, and social disorganization. The maleelement is a destructive force, stern, selfish, aggrandizing (made to seem greater or exaggerated), loving war, violence, conquest,acquisition, breeding in the material and moral world alike discord, disorder, disease, and death. See what a record of blood and cruelty thepages of history reveal! Through what slavery, slaughter, and sacrifice, through what inquisitions and imprisonments, pains andpersecutions, black codes and gloomy creeds, the soul of humanity has struggled for the centuries, while mercy has veiled her face and allhearts have been dead alike to love and hope!2 The male element has held high carnival thus far; it has fairly run riot from the beginning, overpowering the feminine element everywhere,crushing out all the diviner qualities in human nature, until we know but little of true manhood and womanhood, of the lattercomparatively nothing, for it has scarce been recognized as a power until within the last century. Society is but the reflection of manhimself, untempered by woman's thought; the hard iron rule we feel alike in the church, the state, and the home. No one need wonder atthe disorganization, at the fragmentary (disconnected; incomplete) condition of everything, when we remember that man, who representsbut half a complete being, with but half an idea on every subject, has undertaken the absolute control of all sublunary matters.3 People object to the demands of those whom they choose to call the strong-minded, because they say 'the right of suffrage will make thewomen masculine.' That is just the difficulty in which we are involved today. Though disfranchised, we have few women in the best sense;we have simply so many reflections, varieties, and dilutions of the masculine gender. The strong, natural characteristics of womanhood arerepressed and ignored in dependence, for so long as man feeds woman she will try to please the giver and adapt herself to his condition. Tokeep a foothold in society, woman must be as near like man as possible, reflect his ideas, opinions, virtues, motives, prejudices, and vices.She must respect his statutes, though they strip her of every inalienable right, and conflict with that higher law written by the finger of Godon her own soul.4 She must look at everything from its dollar-and-cent point of view, or she is a mere romancer. She must accept things as they are and makethe best of them. To mourn over the miseries of others, the poverty of the poor, their hardships in jails, prisons, asylums, the horrors ofwar, cruelty, and brutality in every form, all this would be mere sentimentalizing. To protest against the intrigue, bribery, and corruption ofpublic life, to desire that her sons might follow some business that did not involve lying, cheating, and a hard, grinding selfishness, would bearrant nonsense.5 In this way man has been molding woman to his ideas by direct and positive influences, while she, if not a negation, has used indirect meansto control him, and in most cases developed the very characteristics both in him and herself that needed repression. And now man himselfstands appalled at the results of his own excesses, and mourns in bitterness that falsehood, selfishness, and violence are the law of life. Theneed of this hour is not territory, gold mines, railroads, or specie payments but a new evangel of womanhood, to exalt purity, virtue,morality, true religion, to lift man up into the higher realms of thought and action.NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintProject Management byPage 11

6 We ask woman's enfranchisement, as the first step toward the recognition of that essential element in government that can only secure thehealth, strength, and prosperity of the nation. Whatever is done to lift woman to her true position will help to usher in a new day of peaceand perfection for the race.7 In speaking of the masculine element, I do not wish to be understood to say that all men are hard, selfish, and brutal, for many of the mostbeautiful spirits the world has known have been clothed with manhood; but I refer to those characteristics, though often marked in woman,that distinguish what is called the stronger sex. For example, the love of acquisition and conquest, the very pioneers of civilization, whenexpended on the earth, the sea, the elements, the riches and forces of nature, are powers of destruction when used to subjugate one manto another or to sacrifice nations to ambition.8 Here that great conservator of woman's love, if permitted to assert itself, as it naturally would in freedom against oppression, violence, andwar, would hold all these destructive forces in check, for woman knows the cost of life better than man does, and not with her consentwould one drop of blood ever be shed, one life sacrificed in vain.9 With violence and disturbance in the natural world, we see a constant effort to maintain an equilibrium of forces. Nature, like a lovingmother, is ever trying to keep land and sea, mountain and valley, each in its place, to hush the angry winds and waves, balance theextremes of heat and cold, of rain and drought, that peace, harmony, and beauty may reign supreme. There is a striking analogy betweenmatter and mind, and the present disorganization of society warns us that in the dethronement of woman we have let loose the elementsof violence and ruin that she only has the power to curb. If the civilization of the age calls for an extension of the suffrage, surely agovernment of the most virtuous educated men and women would better represent the whole and protect the interests of all than couldthe representation of either sex alone.Question 1: Part A (Standard RI.11-12.6)What rhetorical text structure best describes Stanton’s speech?A.B.C.D.problem and solutioncompare and contrast *question and solutioncause and solutionQuestion 1: Part B (Standard RI.11-12.1)Which statement best supports the answer in part A?A.B.C.D.“ we remember that man, who represents but half a complete being, with but half an idea on every subject ” (paragraph 2) *“ they say 'the right of suffrage will make the women masculine.'” (paragraph 3)“She must accept things as they are and make the best of them.” (paragraph 4)“I do not wish to be understood to say that all men are hard, selfish, and brutal ” (paragraph 7)NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading BlueprintProject Management byPage 12

Question 2: Part A (Standard RI.11-12.4)What effect does Stanton create by referring to Nature as a loving mother in paragraph 9?A.B.C.D.Women are better off the way society is structured and closer to nature.Women voting will lead them

ENGLISH LANGU AGE ARTS III READING. NMPED English Language Arts III: Reading Blueprint Project Management by Page 2 Purpose Statement English Language Arts III: Reading The English Language Arts III Reading End-of-Course (EOC) Exam is intended to measure st

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