Component 5: History Of Health Information Technology In .

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Component 5:History of HealthInformationTechnology inthe U.S.Instructor ManualVersion 3.0/Spring 2012

Notes to InstructorsThis Instructor Manual is a resource for instructors using this component.Each component is broken down into units, which include the followingelements: Learning objectives Suggested student readings, texts, reference links tosupplement the narrated PowerPoint slides Lectures (voiceover PowerPoint in Flash format); PowerPointslides (Microsoft PowerPoint format), lecture transcripts(Microsoft Word format); and audio files (MP3 format) foreach lecture Self-assessment questions reflecting Unit Objectives withanswer keys and/or expected outcomes Application Activities (e.g., discussion questions,assignments, projects) with instructor guidelines, answerkeys and/or expected outcomesHealth IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000232

ContentsNotes to Instructors.2Disclaimer.5Component Overview.6Component Objectives.6Component Authors.7Author Biography .10Component 5/Unit 1.15Component 5/Unit 2.22Component 5/Unit 3.26Component 5/Unit 4.29Component 5/Unit 5.33Component 5/Unit 6.37Component 5/Unit 7.41Component 5/Unit 8.46Component 5/Unit 9.50Component 5/Unit 10.52Component 5/Unit 11.55Component 5/Unit 12.59Component 5/Unit 13.62Component 5/Unit 14.65Component 5/Unit 15.68Component 5/Unit 16.71Component Acronym Glossary.75Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike3.0 Unported .79Health IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000233

DisclaimerThese materials were prepared under the sponsorship of an agency ofthe United States Government. Neither the United States Governmentnor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for theaccuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringeprivately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercialproduct, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer,or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or anyagency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein donot necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government orany agency thereof.Likewise, the above also applies to the Curriculum DevelopmentCenters (including Columbia University, Duke University, Johns HopkinsUniversity, Oregon Health & Science University, University of Alabama atBirmingham, and their affiliated entities).Health IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000234

Component OverviewThis component traces the development of IT systems in health care andpublic health, beginning with the experiments of the 1950s and 1960s andculminating in the HITECH act, including the introduction of the concept of“meaningful use” of electronic health records.Component ObjectivesAt the completion of this component, the student will be able to: Explain the rationale for elements of the HITECH Act in terms ofthe history of health IT Describe the background of today’s health IT landscapeincluding EHR, HIE, CDS, applications in Public Health, relevantprofessional organizations Describe the history of regulation of Health IT in the U.S. Describe how legislation related to privacy and security ofelectronic health information has evolved in the US. Discuss how financial incentives for use of HIT have changedover time.Health IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000235

Component AuthorsAssigned InstitutionUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AlabamaTeam LeadEta S. Berner, EdDDepartment of Health Services AdministrationSchool of Health ProfessionsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamPrimary Contributing AuthorsEta S. Berner, EdDDepartment of Health Services AdministrationSchool of Health ProfessionsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamGlenn Hammack, OD, MSHINuPhysicia LLCHouston TexasTerrell Herzig, MSHI, CISSPUAB Health SystemUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamNir Menachemi, PhD, MPHDepartment Health Care Organization and PolicySchool of Public HealthUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamCritical ReviewersMeg N Bruck, MSHIDepartment of Health Services AdministrationSchool of Health ProfessionsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamDarrell E. Burke, PhDDepartment of Health Services AdministrationSchool of Health ProfessionsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamHealth IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000236

Virginia Caris, MADepartment of Health Services AdministrationSchool of Health ProfessionsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamCarol McKelvey, MA, RHIAHealthcare Information ProgramsWallace State Community CollegeNena Scott, MSEd, RHIA, CCS, CCS-PPrecyse Solutions, LLCDonna Stanley, EdS, RHIA, CCSHealthcare Information ProgramsWallace State Community CollegeInstructional DesignersLorrinda Khan, MFADepartment of Health Services AdministrationSchool of Health ProfessionsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamDan L. Murphy, BSNursing Clinical Simulation and TechSchool of NursingUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamMichelle Robinson, PhDSchool of DentistryUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamTest Item Writing AssistantSusie P Bagwell, MABirmingham, ALLecture NarrationNarration talent provided by Maestro Productions, Nashville, TN.NarratorsMilton BagbyLori StegnerHealth IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000237

Sound EngineerBryan TalbotTalbot SoundNashville, TNInstructor Manual EditorShannon Houser, PhD, MPH, RHIADepartment of Health Services AdministrationSchool of Health ProfessionsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamOther ContributorsLance Hanff, MSHIHealth System Information ServicesUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamJonathan McNair, MSHealth Services AdministrationUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamHealth IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000238

Author BiographyEta S. Berner, Ed.D., is a Professor in the Health Informatics Program inthe Health Services Administration Department of the School of HealthProfessions of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Berner is thefounding Director of UAB’s Center for Health Informatics for Patient Safetyand Quality and is co-Director of the Biomedical Informatics Componentof the UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science. She also is aFellow of both the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA)’sAmerican College of Medical Informatics and the Health InformationManagement and Systems Society (HIMSS); Dr. Berner is a member ofa technical expert panel for AHRQ’s Clinical Decision Support Initiativeand is on the Board of Directors for AMIA. She has served on the editorialboards of three journals related to HIT and informatics and has taught inUAB’s Master of Science in Health Informatics Program since 1997.  Inaddition to being the Program Director of UAB’s ONC-funded CurriculumDevelopment Center project, she has received funding for both informaticsand educational research including research on clinical decision support,electronic health records and health information exchange, developmentof online instructional materials for graduate and undergraduate healthinformatics, and the use of videoconferencing as an instructional modalityfor distance learning.Glenn G. Hammack, OD, MSHI, is the founding President of NuPhysiciaLLC, developing it as a spinout company from the University of Texas,where he served as Assistant Vice President of the University ofTexas Medical Branch (UTMB) and founding Executive Director oftheir Electronic Health Network (EHN), developing and managing theirtelemedicine programs. Before 2004, he served as Director of HealthInformatics and Telemedicine, leading implementation of a large-scaleelectronic medical record system and creation of a statewide systemfor primary care and specialty telemedicine. He received his ODOptometry degree from the Michigan College of Optometry at Ferris StateUniversity and his MSHI Master of Science in Health Informatics from theUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham with a Telemedicine internship atMassachusetts General Hospital.Terrell W. Herzig, MSHI, CISSP, is Information Security Officer of theUAB Health System, Birmingham, Alabama, the UAB HIPAA SecurityOfficer, and teaches in the Health Informatics program at the Universityof Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). Mr. Herzig teaches graduate coursesin Information Engineering, Programming, Computer Networks andHealth IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC0000239

Information Security in the UAB School of Health Professions. Duringhis tenure at UAB, he has served as Director of Information Technologyfor the Civitan International Research Center and Director of Informaticsfor the Pittman General Clinical Research Center. Mr. Herzig has alsoconsulted on numerous informatics projects with external groups, includingSouthern Nuclear and the US Army Medical Command. Mr. Herzig is alsothe editor of the recent HIMSS book: Information Security in Healthcare:Managing Risk.Nir Menachemi, PhD, MPH, is Professor and Doctoral Program Director,Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, UAB School ofPublic Health. Relevant roles include being a Health Policy Fellow,Center of Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, Agency for HealthcareResearch and Quality (AHRQ); Director, Center on Patient Safety, FloridaState University, College of Medicine; and Special Advisor to the FloridaGovernor’s Health Information Infrastructure Advisory Committee (20042007). He brings expertise in Public Health, Health Services Delivery, andthe current and historical roles of healthcare IT on the healthcare deliveryinfrastructure in the US. Dr. Menachemi has published extensively onadoption of healthcare IT in the US.Meg Bruck, MSHI, is employed part-time in the Department of HealthServices Administration at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.She provides management and review services on the HIT CurriculumDevelopment Center project. She is a graduate of Hunter College of theCity University of New York with a Master’s degree in Health Informaticsfrom UAB. She has taught several components of the HIT Curriculum atSanta Fe College in Gainesville, FL.Darrell Burke, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Master of Science inHealth Informatics (MSHI). His research has been in the area of adoptionof health IT as well as healthcare operations research. He has designedand taught in both traditional and online formats. He has publishedextensively on the role, measure and impact of healthcare informationtechnology on delivery organizations and has taught for three differentuniversities and a for-profit online education institution. Dr. Burke is amember of the Academy of Management and the Healthcare InformationManagement and Systems Society (HIMSS).Virginia Caris, MA, is employed part-time in the Department of HealthServices Administration at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. SheHealth IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC00002310

provides review and editorial services on the HIT Curriculum DevelopmentCenter project. She is a graduate of Emory University with a Master’sdegree in American Literature from George Washington University. Shehas taught at Diné (Navajo) Community College and at the Universityof Montevallo and has worked in advertising and scientific/medicalpublishing.Carol D. McKelvey, MA, RHIA, has been a member of the faculty of theHealth Information Technology (HIT) Program at Wallace State CommunityCollege since 1993. She earned a B.S. degree in health informationadministration from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and anM.A. degree in health science from the University of Alabama. Over thepast eight years, her concentration has been in the area of e-learning,serving as developer and instructor of distance education classes forthe HIT Program, and evaluator of online course content and quality forWallace State. Prior to becoming an educator, Ms. McKelvey served asthe Director of Health Information Services in general acute care andrehabilitation settings. She is an active member of the American HealthInformation Management Association and the Alabama Association ofHealth Information Management.Nena Scott, MSEd, RHIA, CCS, CCS-P, is a Registered HealthInformation Administrator (RHIA), Certified Coding Specialist (CCS),Certified Coding Specialist - Physician-Based (CCS-P) and an AHIMACertified ICD-10 trainer. She holds a Master’s of Education in WorkforceEducational Leadership from Mississippi State University, Bachelorsdegree in Business Administration from the University of Mississippi andis currently pursuing a PhD in Community College Leadership. Sheis currently employed with Precyse Solutions as the ICD-10 Educator.Prior to this role she was the Program Director of the Health InformationTechnology program at Itawamba Community College. While serving asthe program director she wrote Itawamba Community College’s portionof the grant for the region D consortium. She has served as President ofthe Mississippi Health Information Management Association (MSHIMA)as well as many other leadership positions. She is a former MSHIMADistinguished Member recipient, MSHIMA Educator Award recipient, andChampion Award recipient. She currently services as an accreditationprogram reviewer for the Commission on Accreditation Informatics andInformation Management Education.Health IT Workforce CurriculumHistory of Health InformationTechnology in the U.S.Version 3.0/Spring 2012This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and HumanServices, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC00002311

Donna S. Stanley, EdS, RHIA, CCS, is Director of the Health InformationTechnology (HIT) Associate Degree Program in the Health Division ofWallace State Community College in Hanceville, Alabama. She has beenProgram Director and Instructor in the HIT program since 1992, teachingboth on campus and online courses. Mrs. Stanley is currently the PastPresident of the Alabama Association of Health Information Management(AAHIM). In 2011 she became an AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCSTrainer.Lorrinda Khan, MFA, is a Senior Instructional Design Specialist in theDepartment of Health Services Administration at the University of Alabamaat Birmingham (UAB). She has a MFA and has worked as a seniortextbook editor for professional publications at Davis Publications as wellas an online instructor (Capella University, Southern New HampshireUniversity, Baker College). Her instructional design experiences includecurriculum design and development for the Alabama Fire College and theUniversity of South Florida College of Medicine. At UAB she providessupport for online education for multiple graduate programs within theDepartment of Health Services Administration. She has extensiveexperience with course development and maintenance using a variety ofonline instructional technologies (Blackboard, WebCT, WebCT Vista, etc).She has also published guides for online instruction.Dan L. Murphy, is an Instructional Design Manager in the School ofNursing. He has a BS in Corporate Training and Development and a priorAssociate of Applied Science Degree (Instructor of Technology). He iscurrently studying for a Masters in Education in Instructional Technology.He has prior experience as a Technical Training Instructor and TechnicalTraining Evaluator for the US Air Force. He has developed a VirtualPatient Simulator for which h

Health IT Workforce Curriculum History of Health Information 3 Technology in the U.S. Version 3.0/Spring 2012. This material was developed by The University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Department of Health and Human . Services, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology under Award Number 1U24OC000023. Contents

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